Cytognomix Inc

London, Canada

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London, Canada
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Global Molecular Cytogenetics Market by Technologies, Applications, Growth Trends and Forecast to 2021, New Research by iHealthcareAnalyst, Inc. Molecular Cytogenetics Market by Technology (Array-Comparative Genomic Hybridization, Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization), and Applications (Cancer, Genetic Disorders, Personalized Medicines, Neurological, Cardiovascular and Infectious Diseases) and Forecast 2017-2021 Maryland Heights, MO, April 21, 2017 --( Browse Molecular Cytogenetics Market by Technology (Array-Comparative Genomic Hybridization, Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization), and Applications (Cancer, Genetic Disorders, Personalized Medicines, Neurological, Cardiovascular and Infectious Diseases) and Forecast 2017-2021 at https://www.ihealthcareanalyst.com/report/molecular-cytogenetics-market/ The global molecular cytogenetics market report provides market size (Revenue USD Million 2014 to 2021), market share and forecasts growth trends (CAGR%, 2017 to 2021). The global molecular cytogenetics market segmentation is based on technology (array-comparative genomic hybridization, fluorescence in situ hybridization), and applications (cancer, genetic disorders, personalized medicines, neurological, cardiovascular and infectious diseases). The global molecular cytogenetics market report also provides the detailed market landscape (market drivers, restraints, opportunities), market attractiveness analysis and also tracks the major competitors operating in the market and provides analysis of the company overview, financial snapshot, key products, technologies and services offered, market share analysis and recent trends in the global market. The global molecular cytogenetics market research report is further segmented by geography into North America (U.S., Canada), Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, Rest of LA), Europe (U.K., Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Rest of EU), Asia Pacific (Japan, China, India, Rest of APAC), and Rest of the World. Major players operating in the global molecular cytogenetics market and included in this report are Abbott Molecular Inc., Applied Spectral Imaging, Inc., Illumina Inc., Life Technologies Corporation, Cytognomix, Inc. and others. 1. Technology 1.1. Array-Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) 1.2. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) 2. Application 2.1. Cancer 2.2. Genetic Disorders 2.3. Personalized Medicines 2.4. Others (Neurological, Cardiovascular and Infectious Diseases, etc.) 3. Geography (Region, Country) 3.1. North America (U.S., Canada) 3.2. Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, Rest of LA) 3.3. Europe (U.K., Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Rest of EU) 3.4. Asia Pacific (Japan, China, India, Rest of APAC) 3.5. Rest of the World 4. Company Profiles 4.1. Abbott Laboratories 4.2. Affymetrix, Inc. 4.3. Agilent Technologies, Inc. 4.4. Applied Spectral Imaging, Inc. 4.5. BI Biological Industries 4.6. Bio-Rad Laboratories 4.7. CytoTest Inc. 4.8. Cytognomix, Inc. 4.9. F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd. 4.10. Illumina Inc. 4.11. LEICA BIOSYSTEMS 4.12. Life Technologies Corporation 4.13. Oxford Gene Technology 4.14. PerkinElmer, Inc. 4.15. SciGene Corporation To request Table of Contents and Sample Pages of this report visit: https://www.ihealthcareanalyst.com/report/molecular-cytogenetics-market/ About Us iHealthcareAnalyst, Inc. is a global healthcare market research and consulting company providing market analysis, and competitive intelligence services to global clients. The company publishes syndicate, custom and consulting grade healthcare reports covering animal healthcare, biotechnology, clinical diagnostics, healthcare informatics, healthcare services, medical devices, medical equipment, and pharmaceuticals. In addition to multi-client studies, we offer creative consulting services and conduct proprietary single-client assignments targeted at client’s specific business objectives, information needs, time frame and budget. Please contact us to receive a proposal for a proprietary single-client study. Contact Us iHealthcareAnalyst, Inc. 2109, Mckelvey Hill Drive, Maryland Heights, MO 63043 United States Email: sales@ihealthcareanalyst.com Website: https://www.ihealthcareanalyst.com Maryland Heights, MO, April 21, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Molecular biological techniques are at the forefront as they have the advantage of providing a combined research of molecular as well as cytological approach. Introduction of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) technologies have contributed significantly to the molecular cytogenetics market in the diagnostics and research sectors. FISH and aCGH diagnostic techniques are considered as excellent diagnostic tools because of their ability to provide accurate diagnosis in a short span of time. Cytogenetic analyses are considered mandatory part for leukemia diagnosis. Introduction of advanced technologies enable healthcare professionals in detecting chromosomal abnormalities and hidden chromosome aberrations in patients. FISH has provided significant advances in both research and diagnosis of genetic abnormalities, hematological malignancies and solid tumors. aCGH is preferred over other techniques due to its ability to detect deletion, duplication or amplification at a sub-microscopic level. Globally rising number of cancer cases, genetic disorders, hematological malignancies and technological advancements are some of the factors contributing to the global molecular cytogenetics market.Browse Molecular Cytogenetics Market by Technology (Array-Comparative Genomic Hybridization, Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization), and Applications (Cancer, Genetic Disorders, Personalized Medicines, Neurological, Cardiovascular and Infectious Diseases) and Forecast 2017-2021 at https://www.ihealthcareanalyst.com/report/molecular-cytogenetics-market/The global molecular cytogenetics market report provides market size (Revenue USD Million 2014 to 2021), market share and forecasts growth trends (CAGR%, 2017 to 2021).The global molecular cytogenetics market segmentation is based on technology (array-comparative genomic hybridization, fluorescence in situ hybridization), and applications (cancer, genetic disorders, personalized medicines, neurological, cardiovascular and infectious diseases).The global molecular cytogenetics market report also provides the detailed market landscape (market drivers, restraints, opportunities), market attractiveness analysis and also tracks the major competitors operating in the market and provides analysis of the company overview, financial snapshot, key products, technologies and services offered, market share analysis and recent trends in the global market. The global molecular cytogenetics market research report is further segmented by geography into North America (U.S., Canada), Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, Rest of LA), Europe (U.K., Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Rest of EU), Asia Pacific (Japan, China, India, Rest of APAC), and Rest of the World.Major players operating in the global molecular cytogenetics market and included in this report are Abbott Molecular Inc., Applied Spectral Imaging, Inc., Illumina Inc., Life Technologies Corporation, Cytognomix, Inc. and others.1. Technology1.1. Array-Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH)1.2. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)2. Application2.1. Cancer2.2. Genetic Disorders2.3. Personalized Medicines2.4. Others (Neurological, Cardiovascular and Infectious Diseases, etc.)3. Geography (Region, Country)3.1. North America (U.S., Canada)3.2. Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, Rest of LA)3.3. Europe (U.K., Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Rest of EU)3.4. Asia Pacific (Japan, China, India, Rest of APAC)3.5. Rest of the World4. Company Profiles4.1. Abbott Laboratories4.2. Affymetrix, Inc.4.3. Agilent Technologies, Inc.4.4. Applied Spectral Imaging, Inc.4.5. BI Biological Industries4.6. Bio-Rad Laboratories4.7. CytoTest Inc.4.8. Cytognomix, Inc.4.9. F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd.4.10. Illumina Inc.4.11. LEICA BIOSYSTEMS4.12. Life Technologies Corporation4.13. Oxford Gene Technology4.14. PerkinElmer, Inc.4.15. SciGene CorporationTo request Table of Contents and Sample Pages of this report visit:https://www.ihealthcareanalyst.com/report/molecular-cytogenetics-market/About UsiHealthcareAnalyst, Inc. is a global healthcare market research and consulting company providing market analysis, and competitive intelligence services to global clients. The company publishes syndicate, custom and consulting grade healthcare reports covering animal healthcare, biotechnology, clinical diagnostics, healthcare informatics, healthcare services, medical devices, medical equipment, and pharmaceuticals.In addition to multi-client studies, we offer creative consulting services and conduct proprietary single-client assignments targeted at client’s specific business objectives, information needs, time frame and budget. Please contact us to receive a proposal for a proprietary single-client study.Contact UsiHealthcareAnalyst, Inc.2109, Mckelvey Hill Drive,Maryland Heights, MO 63043United StatesEmail: sales@ihealthcareanalyst.comWebsite: https://www.ihealthcareanalyst.com


Rogan P.K.,University of Western Ontario | Rogan P.K.,Cytognomix Inc. | Li Y.,University of Western Ontario | Wilkins R.C.,Consumer and Clinical Radiation Protection Bureau | And 3 more authors.
Radiation Protection Dosimetry | Year: 2016

The dose from ionizing radiation exposure can be interpolated from a calibration curve fit to the frequency of dicentric chromosomes (DCs) at multiple doses. As DC counts are manually determined, there is an acute need for accurate, fully automated biodosimetry calibration curve generation and analysis of exposed samples. Software, the Automated Dicentric Chromosome Identifier (ADCI), is presented which detects and discriminates DCs from monocentric chromosomes, computes biodosimetry calibration curves and estimates radiation dose. Images of metaphase cells from samples, exposed at 1.4-3.4Gy, that had been manually scored by two reference laboratories were reanalyzed with ADCI. This resulted in estimated exposures within 0.4-1.1Gy of the physical dose. Therefore, ADCI can determine radiation dose with accuracies comparable to standard triage biodosimetry. Calibration curves were generated from metaphase images in ~10 h, and dose estimations required ~0.8 h per 500 image sample. Running multiple instances of ADCI may be an effective response to a mass casualty radiation event. © The Author 2016.


Shirley B.C.,University of Western Ontario | Mucaki E.J.,University of Western Ontario | Whitehead T.,SHARCNET | Costea P.I.,KTH Royal Institute of Technology | And 3 more authors.
Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics | Year: 2013

Information theory-based methods have been shown to be sensitive and specific for predicting and quantifying the effects of non-coding mutations in Mendelian diseases. We present the Shannon pipeline software for genome-scale mutation analysis and provide evidence that the software predicts variants affecting mRNA splicing. Individual information contents (in bits) of reference and variant splice sites are compared and significant differences are annotated and prioritized. The software has been implemented for CLC-Bio Genomics platform. Annotation indicates the context of novel mutations as well as common and rare SNPs with splicing effects. Potential natural and cryptic mRNA splicing variants are identified, and null mutations are distinguished from leaky mutations. Mutations and rare SNPs were predicted in genomes of three cancer cell lines (U2OS, U251 and A431), which were supported by expression analyses. After filtering, tractable numbers of potentially deleterious variants are predicted by the software, suitable for further laboratory investigation. In these cell lines, novel functional variants comprised 6-17 inactivating mutations, 1-5 leaky mutations and 6-13 cryptic splicing mutations. Predicted effects were validated by RNA-seq analysis of the three aforementioned cancer cell lines, and expression microarray analysis of SNPs in HapMap cell lines. © 2013.


Dorman S.N.,University of Western Ontario | Baranova K.,University of Western Ontario | Knoll J.H.M.,University of Western Ontario | Knoll J.H.M.,London Health Sciences Center | And 6 more authors.
Molecular Oncology | Year: 2016

Increasingly, the effectiveness of adjuvant chemotherapy agents for breast cancer has been related to changes in the genomic profile of tumors. We investigated correspondence between growth inhibitory concentrations of paclitaxel and gemcitabine (GI50) and gene copy number, mutation, and expression first in breast cancer cell lines and then in patients. Genes encoding direct targets of these drugs, metabolizing enzymes, transporters, and those previously associated with chemoresistance to paclitaxel (n = 31 genes) or gemcitabine (n = 18) were analyzed. A multi-factorial, principal component analysis (MFA) indicated expression was the strongest indicator of sensitivity for paclitaxel, and copy number and expression were informative for gemcitabine. The factors were combined using support vector machines (SVM). Expression of 15 genes (ABCC10, BCL2, BCL2L1, BIRC5, BMF, FGF2, FN1, MAP4, MAPT, NFKB2, SLCO1B3, TLR6, TMEM243, TWIST1, and CSAG2) predicted cell line sensitivity to paclitaxel with 82% accuracy. Copy number profiles of 3 genes (ABCC10, NT5C, TYMS) together with expression of 7 genes (ABCB1, ABCC10, CMPK1, DCTD, NME1, RRM1, RRM2B), predicted gemcitabine response with 85% accuracy. Expression and copy number studies of two independent sets of patients with known responses were then analyzed with these models. These included tumor blocks from 21 patients that were treated with both paclitaxel and gemcitabine, and 319 patients on paclitaxel and anthracycline therapy. A new paclitaxel SVM was derived from an 11-gene subset since data for 4 of the original genes was unavailable. The accuracy of this SVM was similar in cell lines and tumor blocks (70-71%). The gemcitabine SVM exhibited 62% prediction accuracy for the tumor blocks due to the presence of samples with poor nucleic acid integrity. Nevertheless, the paclitaxel SVM predicted sensitivity in 84% of patients with no or minimal residual disease. © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.


Caminsky N.G.,University of Western Ontario | Mucaki E.J.,University of Western Ontario | Perri A.M.,University of Western Ontario | Lu R.,University of Western Ontario | And 4 more authors.
Human Mutation | Year: 2016

BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) does not identify all pathogenic variants. Sequencing of 20 complete genes in HBOC patients with uninformative test results (N = 287), including noncoding and flanking sequences of ATM, BARD1, BRCA1, BRCA2, CDH1, CHEK2, EPCAM, MLH1, MRE11A, MSH2, MSH6, MUTYH, NBN, PALB2, PMS2, PTEN, RAD51B, STK11, TP53, and XRCC2, identified 38,372 unique variants. We apply information theory (IT) to predict and prioritize noncoding variants of uncertain significance in regulatory, coding, and intronic regions based on changes in binding sites in these genes. Besides mRNA splicing, IT provides a common framework to evaluate potential affinity changes in transcription factor (TFBSs), splicing regulatory (SRBSs), and RNA-binding protein (RBBSs) binding sites following mutation. We prioritized variants affecting the strengths of 10 splice sites (four natural, six cryptic), 148 SRBS, 36 TFBS, and 31 RBBS. Three variants were also prioritized based on their predicted effects on mRNA secondary (2°) structure and 17 for pseudoexon activation. Additionally, four frameshift, two in-frame deletions, and five stop-gain mutations were identified. When combined with pedigree information, complete gene sequence analysis can focus attention on a limited set of variants in a wide spectrum of functional mutation types for downstream functional and co-segregation analysis. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.


Khan W.A.,University of Western Ontario | Rogan P.K.,University of Western Ontario | Rogan P.K.,Cytognomix Inc. | Knoll J.H.M.,University of Western Ontario | Knoll J.H.M.,Cytognomix Inc.
Molecular Cytogenetics | Year: 2015

Background: Chromatin-modifying reagents that alter histone associating proteins, DNA conformation or its sequence are well established strategies for studying chromatin structure in interphase (G1, S, G2). Little is known about how these compounds act during metaphase. We assessed the effects of these reagents at genomic loci that show reproducible, non-random differences in accessibility to chromatin that distinguish homologous targets by single copy DNA probe fluorescence in situ hybridization (scFISH). By super-resolution 3-D structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) and other criteria, the differences correspond to 'differential accessibility' (DA) to these chromosomal regions. At these chromosomal loci, DA of the same homologous chromosome is stable and epigenetic hallmarks of less accessible interphase chromatin are present. Results: To understand the basis for DA, we investigate the impact of epigenetic modifiers on these allelic differences in chromatin accessibility between metaphase homologs in lymphoblastoid cell lines. Allelic differences in metaphase chromosome accessibility represent a stable chromatin mark on mitotic metaphase chromosomes. Inhibition of the topoisomerase IIα-DNA cleavage complex reversed DA. Inter-homolog probe fluorescence intensity ratios between chromosomes treated with ICRF-193 were significantly lower than untreated controls. 3D-SIM demonstrated that differences in hybridized probe volume and depth between allelic targets were equalized by this treatment. By contrast, DA was impervious to chromosome decondensation treatments targeting histone modifying enzymes, cytosine methylation, as well as in cells with regulatory defects in chromatid cohesion. These data altogether suggest that DA is a reflection of allelic differences in metaphase chromosome compaction, dictated by the localized catenation state of the chromosome, rather than by other epigenetic marks. Conclusions: Inhibition of the topoisomerase IIα-DNA cleavage complex mitigated DA by decreasing DNA superhelicity and axial metaphase chromosome condensation. This has potential implications for the mechanism of preservation of cellular phenotypes that enables the same chromatin structure to be correctly reestablished in progeny cells of the same tissue or individual. © 2015 Khan et al.


PubMed | University of Western Ontario, Cytognomix Inc., Chalk River Laboratories and Consumer and Clinical Radiation Protection Bureau
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Radiation protection dosimetry | Year: 2016

The dose from ionizing radiation exposure can be interpolated from a calibration curve fit to the frequency of dicentric chromosomes (DCs) at multiple doses. As DC counts are manually determined, there is an acute need for accurate, fully automated biodosimetry calibration curve generation and analysis of exposed samples. Software, the Automated Dicentric Chromosome Identifier (ADCI), is presented which detects and discriminates DCs from monocentric chromosomes, computes biodosimetry calibration curves and estimates radiation dose. Images of metaphase cells from samples, exposed at 1.4-3.4 Gy, that had been manually scored by two reference laboratories were reanalyzed with ADCI. This resulted in estimated exposures within 0.4-1.1 Gy of the physical dose. Therefore, ADCI can determine radiation dose with accuracies comparable to standard triage biodosimetry. Calibration curves were generated from metaphase images in ~10 h, and dose estimations required ~0.8 h per 500 image sample. Running multiple instances of ADCI may be an effective response to a mass casualty radiation event.


PubMed | University of Western Ontario and Cytognomix Inc.
Type: | Journal: F1000Research | Year: 2014

Interpretation of variants present in complete genomes or exomes reveals numerous sequence changes, only a fraction of which are likely to be pathogenic. Mutations have been traditionally inferred from allele frequencies and inheritance patterns in such data. Variants predicted to alter mRNA splicing can be validated by manual inspection of transcriptome sequencing data, however this approach is intractable for large datasets. These abnormal mRNA splicing patterns are characterized by reads demonstrating either exon skipping, cryptic splice site use, and high levels of intron inclusion, or combinations of these properties. We present, Veridical, an in silico method for the automatic validation of DNA sequencing variants that alter mRNA splicing. Veridical performs statistically valid comparisons of the normalized read counts of abnormal RNA species in mutant versus non-mutant tissues. This leverages large numbers of control samples to corroborate the consequences of predicted splicing variants in complete genomes and exomes.


A method is described for the automatic validation of DNA sequencing variants that alter mRNA splicing from nucleic acids isolated from a patient or tissue sample. Evidence the a predicted splicing mutation is demonstrated by performing statistically valid comparisons between sequence read counts of abnormal RNA species in mutant versus non-mutant tissues. The method leverages large numbers of control samples to corroborate the consequences of predicted splicing variants in complete genomes and exomes for individuals carrying such mutations. Because the method examines all transcript evidence in a genome, it is not necessary a priori to know which gene or genes carry a splicing mutation.

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