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DUBLIN, May 11, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Dublin - Research and Markets has announced the addition of Jain PharmaBiotech's new report "Cytogenetics - Technologies, Markets and Companies" to their offering. This report deals with cytogenetics in a broader sense rather than the...


This report deals with cytogenetics in a broader sense rather than the classical use mainly to describe the chromosome structure and identify abnormalities related to disease. In the age of molecular biology, it is also referred to as molecular cytogenetics. The scope of cytogenetics includes several technologies besides fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), and multicolor FISH. Molecular cytogenetics includes application of nanobiotechnology, microarrays, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), in vivo imaging, and single molecule detection. Bioinformatics is described briefly as it plays an important role in analyzing data from many of these technologies. FISH remains the single most important technology in cytogenetics. Several innovations are described of which the most important are single copy FISH, in vivo FISH (imaging of nucleic acids in living cells) and nanotechnology-based FISH. The unique character of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) allows these probes to hybridize to target nucleic acid molecules more rapidly and with higher affinity and specificity compared with DNA probes. PNA-FISH is more suited for rapid diagnosis of infections. RNA-FISH and locked nucleic acids (LNAs), are also described. Microarray/biochip-based technologies for cytogenetics promise to speed up detection of chromosome aberrations now examined by FISH. Other important genomic technologies are whole genome expression array and direct molecular analysis without amplification. Analysis of single-cell gene expression promises a more precise understanding of human disease pathogenesis and has important diagnostic applications. Optical Mapping can survey entire human genomes for insertions/deletions, which account for a significantly greater proportion of genetic variation between closely-related genomes as compared to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and are a major cause of gene defects. The report includes summary profiles of 69 companies relevant to cytogenetics along with their 80 collaborations. Companies developing innovative technologies as well as those supplying equipment/services/reagents are identified. The report text is supplemented with 27 Tables and 9 figures. Selected 200 references are included in the bibliography. Key Topics Covered: Executive Summary 1. Introduction 2. Technologies used for cytogenetics 3. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization 4. Genomic Technologies relevant to Cytogenetics 5. Molecular Imaging & Single Molecular Detection 6. Role of Nanobiotechnology in Cytogenetics 7. Biomarkers and Cytogenetics 8. Applications of Cytogenetics 9. Cancer Cytogenetics 10. Cytogenetics Markets 11. Companies 12. References For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/vzv3hl/cytogenetics Research and Markets Laura Wood, Senior Manager press@researchandmarkets.com For E.S.T Office Hours Call +1-917-300-0470 For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call +1-800-526-8630 For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900 U.S. Fax: 646-607-1907 Fax (outside U.S.): +353-1-481-1716 To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/global-2017-cytogenetics-technologies-markets-and-companies-report---projections-to-2026-69-companies-with-80-collaborations---research-and-markets-300455435.html


Acentria's fritillary (Melitaea acentria), a new butterfly species discovered in Israel on the slopes of the popular Mount Hermon ski resort. Credit: Dr Vladimir Lukhtanov Vladimir Lukhtanov, entomologist and evolutionary biologist at the Zoological Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia, made a startling discovery: what people had thought was a population of a common species, turned out to be a whole new organism and, moreover - one with an interesting evolutionary history. This new species is named Acentria's fritillary (Melitaea acentria) and was found flying right over the slopes of the popular Mount Hermon ski resort in northern Israel. It is described in the open access journal Comparative Cytogenetics. "To me, it was a surprise that no one had already discovered it," says Vladimir Lukhtanov. "Thousands of people had observed and many had even photographed this beautifully coloured butterfly, yet no one recognised it as a separate species. The lepidopterists (experts in butterflies and moths) had been sure that the Hermon samples belonged to the common species called Persian fritillary (Melitaea persea), because of their similar appearance, but nobody made the effort to study their internal anatomy and DNA". In 2012, Vladimir Lukhtanov, together with his students, initiated an exhaustive study of Israeli butterflies using an array of modern and traditional research techniques. In 2013, Asya Novikova (until 2012, a master's student at St. Petersburg University and, from 2013, a PhD student at the Hebrew University, Jerusalem) sampled a few fritillaries from Mt. Hermon. It was at that time when the researchers noticed that the specimens "didn't look right" - their genitalia appeared different from those of the typical Persian fritillary. Over the next few years, Lukhtanov and his students studied this population in-depth. They carried out sequencing DNA from the specimens and found that they had a unique molecular signature - very different from the DNA of any other fritillary. The Acentria's fritillary seems to be endemic in northern Israel and the neighbouring territories of Syria and Lebanon. Its evolutionary history is likely to prove interesting. "The species is probably one of a handful of butterflies known to have arisen through hybridisation between two other species in the past," says Lukhtanov. "This process is known to be common in plants, but scientists have only recently realised it might also be present in butterflies." This is the first new butterfly species discovered and described from the territory of Israel in 109 years. More information: Vladimir A. Lukhtanov, A new species of Melitaea from Israel, with notes on taxonomy, cytogenetics, phylogeography and interspecific hybridization in the Melitaea persea complex (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae), Comparative Cytogenetics (2017). DOI: 10.3897/CompCytogen.v11i2.12370


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Vladimir Lukhtanov, entomologist and evolutionary biologist at the Zoological Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia, made a startling discovery: what people had thought was a population of a common species, turned out to be a whole new organism and, moreover - one with an interesting evolutionary history. This new species is named Acentria's fritillary (Melitaea acentria) and was found flying right over the slopes of the popular Mount Hermon ski resort in northern Israel. It is described in the open access journal Comparative Cytogenetics. "To me, it was a surprise that no one had already discovered it," says Vladimir Lukhtanov. "Thousands of people had observed and many had even photographed this beautifully coloured butterfly, yet no one recognised it as a separate species. The lepidopterists (experts in butterflies and moths) had been sure that the Hermon samples belonged to the common species called Persian fritillary (Melitaea persea), because of their similar appearance, but nobody made the effort to study their internal anatomy and DNA". In 2012, Vladimir Lukhtanov, together with his students, initiated an exhaustive study of Israeli butterflies using an array of modern and traditional research techniques. In 2013, Asya Novikova (until 2012, a master's student at St. Petersburg University and, from 2013, a PhD student at the Hebrew University, Jerusalem) sampled a few fritillaries from Mt. Hermon. It was at that time when the researchers noticed that the specimens "didn't look right" - their genitalia appeared different from those of the typical Persian fritillary. Over the next few years, Lukhtanov and his students studied this population in-depth. They carried out sequencing DNA from the specimens and found that they had a unique molecular signature - very different from the DNA of any other fritillary. The Acentria's fritillary seems to be endemic in northern Israel and the neighbouring territories of Syria and Lebanon. Its evolutionary history is likely to prove interesting. "The species is probably one of a handful of butterflies known to have arisen through hybridisation between two other species in the past," says Lukhtanov. "This process is known to be common in plants, but scientists have only recently realised it might also be present in butterflies." This is the first new butterfly species discovered and described from the territory of Israel in 109 years. Lukhtanov VA (2017) A new species of Melitaea from Israel, with notes on taxonomy, cytogenetics, phylogeography and interspecific hybridization in the Melitaea persea complex (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae). Comparative Cytogenetics 11(2): 325-357. https:/


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

Vladimir Lukhtanov, entomologist and evolutionary biologist at the Zoological Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia, made a startling discovery: what people had thought was a population of a common species, turned out to be a whole new organism and, moreover - one with an interesting evolutionary history. This new species is named Acentria's fritillary (Melitaea acentria) and was found flying right over the slopes of the popular Mount Hermon ski resort in northern Israel. It is described in the open access journal Comparative Cytogenetics. "To me, it was a surprise that no one had already discovered it," said Vladimir Lukhtanov. "Thousands of people had observed and many had even photographed this beautifully coloured butterfly, yet no one recognised it as a separate species. The lepidopterists (experts in butterflies and moths) had been sure that the Hermon samples belonged to the common species called Persian fritillary (Melitaea persea), because of their similar appearance, but nobody made the effort to study their internal anatomy and DNA". In 2012, Vladimir Lukhtanov, together with his students, initiated an exhaustive study of Israeli butterflies using an array of modern and traditional research techniques. In 2013, Asya Novikova (until 2012, a master's student at St. Petersburg University and, from 2013, a Ph.D. student at the Hebrew University, Jerusalem) sampled a few fritillaries from Mt. Hermon. It was at that time when the researchers noticed that the specimens "didn't look right" - their genitalia appeared different from those of the typical Persian fritillary. Over the next few years, Lukhtanov and his students studied this population in-depth. They carried out sequencing DNA from the specimens and found that they had a unique molecular signature - very different from the DNA of any other fritillary. The Acentria's fritillary seems to be endemic in northern Israel and the neighbouring territories of Syria and Lebanon. Its evolutionary history is likely to prove interesting. "The species is probably one of a handful of butterflies known to have arisen through hybridisation between two other species in the past," said Lukhtanov. "This process is known to be common in plants, but scientists have only recently realised it might also be present in butterflies." This is the first new butterfly species discovered and described from the territory of Israel in 109 years.


DUBLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Research and Markets has announced the addition of Jain PharmaBiotech's new report "Cytogenetics - Technologies, Markets and Companies" to their offering. This report deals with cytogenetics in a broader sense rather than the classical use mainly to describe the chromosome structure and identify abnormalities related to disease. In the age of molecular biology, it is also referred to as molecular cytogenetics. The scope of cytogenetics includes several technologies besides fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), and multicolor FISH. Molecular cytogenetics includes application of nanobiotechnology, microarrays, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), in vivo imaging, and single molecule detection. Bioinformatics is described briefly as it plays an important role in analyzing data from many of these technologies. FISH remains the single most important technology in cytogenetics. Several innovations are described of which the most important are single copy FISH, in vivo FISH (imaging of nucleic acids in living cells) and nanotechnology-based FISH. The unique character of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) allows these probes to hybridize to target nucleic acid molecules more rapidly and with higher affinity and specificity compared with DNA probes. PNA-FISH is more suited for rapid diagnosis of infections. RNA-FISH and locked nucleic acids (LNAs), are also described. Microarray/biochip-based technologies for cytogenetics promise to speed up detection of chromosome aberrations now examined by FISH. Other important genomic technologies are whole genome expression array and direct molecular analysis without amplification. Analysis of single-cell gene expression promises a more precise understanding of human disease pathogenesis and has important diagnostic applications. Optical Mapping can survey entire human genomes for insertions/deletions, which account for a significantly greater proportion of genetic variation between closely-related genomes as compared to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and are a major cause of gene defects. The report includes summary profiles of 69 companies relevant to cytogenetics along with their 80 collaborations. Companies developing innovative technologies as well as those supplying equipment/services/reagents are identified. The report text is supplemented with 27 Tables and 9 figures. Selected 200 references are included in the bibliography. For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/9hr5g9/cytogenetics


News Article | November 3, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

SAN DIEGO and TORONTO, Nov. 03, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Aptose Biosciences Inc. (NASDAQ:APTO) (TSX:APS), a clinical-stage company developing new therapeutics and molecular diagnostics that target the underlying mechanisms of cancer, today announced that new preclinical data for its lead investigational anticancer therapeutic APTO-253 will be presented at the 58th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting and Exposition being held December 3-6, 2016, in San Diego, CA. Inhibition of c-Myc By Apto-253 As an Innovative Therapeutic Approach to Induce Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Date & Time: Saturday, December 3, 2016, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Session Title: 617. Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Biology, Cytogenetics, and Molecular Markers in Diagnosis and Prognosis: Poster I Abstract Number: 1716 Location: San Diego Convention Center, Hall GH The abstract can be viewed on the ASH conference website at the following link: Aptose Biosciences is a clinical-stage biotechnology company developing personalized therapies to address unmet medical needs in oncology, with a particular focus on hematologic malignancies. Aptose is advancing new therapeutics focused on well validated and novel drug targets on the leading edge of cancer research, coupled with validated biomarkers to identify the optimal patient population for our products. The company's small molecule cancer therapeutics pipeline includes products designed for potent single agent activity and to enhance the efficacy of existing anti-cancer therapies without overlapping toxicities. Aptose Biosciences Inc. is listed on NASDAQ under the symbol APTO and on the TSX under the symbol APS.  For further information, please visit www.aptose.com. This press release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Canadian and U.S. securities laws. Such statements include, but are not limited to, statements relating to the return of APTO-253 to the clinic and the process to have the clinical hold lifted by the FDA and statements relating to the Company’s plans, objectives, expectations and intentions and other statements including words such as “continue”, “expect”, “intend”, “will”, “should”, “would”, “may”, and other similar expressions. Such statements reflect our current views with respect to future events and are subject to risks and uncertainties and are necessarily based upon a number of estimates and assumptions that, while considered reasonable by us are inherently subject to significant business, economic, competitive, political and social uncertainties and contingencies. Many factors could cause our actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements described in this press release. Such factors could include, among others: our ability to obtain the capital required for research and operations; the inherent risks in early stage drug development including demonstrating efficacy; development time/cost and the regulatory approval process; the progress of our clinical trials; our ability to find and enter into agreements with potential partners; our ability to attract and retain key personnel; changing market conditions; uncertainty in the length of the clinical hold and the conditions the FDA may impose to lift it; inability of new manufacturers to produce acceptable batches of GMP in sufficient quantities; unexpected manufacturing defects; and other risks detailed from time-to-time in our ongoing quarterly filings, annual information forms, annual reports and annual filings with Canadian securities regulators and the United States Securities and Exchange Commission. Should one or more of these risks or uncertainties materialize, or should the assumptions set out in the section entitled "Risk Factors" in our filings with Canadian securities regulators and the United States Securities and Exchange Commission underlying those forward-looking statements prove incorrect, actual results may vary materially from those described herein. These forward-looking statements are made as of the date of this press release and we do not intend, and do not assume any obligation, to update these forward-looking statements, except as required by law. We cannot assure you that such statements will prove to be accurate as actual results and future events could differ materially from those anticipated in such statements. Investors are cautioned that forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and accordingly investors are cautioned not to put undue reliance on forward-looking statements due to the inherent uncertainty therein.


Dublin, Dec. 20, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of Jain PharmaBiotech's new report "Cytogenetics - Technologies, Markets and Companies" to their offering. This report deals with cytogenetics in a broader sense rather than the classical use mainly to describe the chromosome structure and identify abnormalities related to disease. In the age of molecular biology, it is also referred to as molecular cytogenetics. The scope of cytogenetics includes several technologies besides fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), and multicolor FISH. Molecular cytogenetics includes application of nanobiotechnology, microarrays, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), in vivo imaging, and single molecule detection. Bioinformatics is described briefly as it plays an important role in analyzing data from many of these technologies. FISH remains the single most important technology in cytogenetics. Several innovations are described of which the most important are single copy FISH, in vivo FISH (imaging of nucleic acids in living cells) and nanotechnology-based FISH. The unique character of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) allows these probes to hybridize to target nucleic acid molecules more rapidly and with higher affinity and specificity compared with DNA probes. PNA-FISH is more suited for rapid diagnosis of infections. RNA-FISH and locked nucleic acids (LNAs), are also described. The chapter on markets provides a global perspective of the cytogenetics business in the major markets: US, Western Europe (including France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the UK), and Japan. The total figures for the market are also broken out according to the technologies and major disease areas in which they are applied. Markets figure are given for the year 2015 and estimates are made for the years 2020 and 2025. The report includes summary profiles of 69 companies relevant to cytogenetics along with their 80 collaborations. Companies developing innovative technologies as well as those supplying equipment/services/reagents are identified.The report text is supplemented with 27 Tables and 9 figures. Selected 200 references are included in the bibliography. Key Topics Covered: Executive Summary 1. Introduction 2. Technologies used for cytogenetics 3. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization 4. Genomic Technologies relevant to Cytogenetics 5. Molecular Imaging & Single Molecular Detection 6. Role of Nanobiotechnology in Cytogenetics 7. Biomarkers and Cytogenetics 8. Applications of Cytogenetics 9. Cancer Cytogenetics 10. Cytogenetics Markets 11. Companies 12. References For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/257qsf/cytogenetics


From a geographical point of view, the Caucasus is far from an island or even a peninsula, being a relatively big mountainous region appearing as a fence at the border of Europe and Asia, situated between the Black and the Caspian seas. However, a study into the chromosome structure of mosquito larvae of the species Glyptotendipes salinus, living by a saltwater lake in the foothills of the Caucasus, suggests that the region could be imagined as an "island" in the "sea" of steppes. Scientists Dr Mukhamed Karmokov, Tembotov Institute of Ecology of Mountain territories, Russian Academy of Science, and Dr Azamat Akkizov, Institute of Biomedical Problems, RAS, and Center of Medico-Ecological Researches, have their paper, where they describe the Caucasian population of the species, published in the open access journal Comparative Cytogenetics. Earlier, it has been known that in the Tambukan Lake, located at the foothills of the Caucasus Mountains, lives at least one of the representatives of the genus Glyptotendipes, more precisely, the species G. salinus. Actually, the process of studying the fauna of the genus in the Caucasus region has just began and many questions have remained unclear. During their research, the authors collected a sufficient amount of larvae of G. salinus that made it possible to study the chromosome structure, rearrangements and peculiarities of the Caucasian population of the species. In addition, the authors tried to understand how the population relates to the previously studied ones, living in the Altai region of Russia and Kazakhstan. Researchers found interesting, some of them even striking, peculiarities in the chromosome structure and morphology of the larvae from Caucasus. Namely, they found four new chromosome rearrangements, likely unique for the Caucasus. Also, some of the chromosome characters were most similar to the mosquitoes from Altai, while others—to the population in Kazakhstan. The most curious difference of the Caucasian larvae in comparison to data from earlier studies was that they were twice as short. In conclusion, the authors note that from the obtained data it could be deduced that that the Caucasian population had undergone a significant divergence, or even that it represents a subspecies. Also, it turns out that the Caucasus itself is a relatively isolated and complex region in terms of microevolution. "The Caucasus, in some sense, can be imagined as a relatively isolated territory, a special place, where evolution has made some unexpected twists," they say. Explore further: Europe, Siberia and in between: Caucasian populations of non-biting midges More information: Mukhamed Karmokov et al, Karyotype characteristics, larval morphology and chromosomal polymorphism peculiarities of Glyptotendipes salinus Michailova, 1983 (Diptera, Chironomidae) from Tambukan Lake, Central Caucasus, Comparative Cytogenetics (2016). DOI: 10.3897/compcytogen.v10i4.9400


Research and Markets has announced the addition of Jain PharmaBiotech's new report "Cytogenetics - Technologies, Markets and Companies" to their offering. This report deals with cytogenetics in a broader sense rather than the classical use mainly to describe the chromosome structure and identify abnormalities related to disease. In the age of molecular biology, it is also referred to as molecular cytogenetics. The scope of cytogenetics includes several technologies besides fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), and multicolor FISH. Molecular cytogenetics includes application of nanobiotechnology, microarrays, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), in vivo imaging, and single molecule detection. Bioinformatics is described briefly as it plays an important role in analyzing data from many of these technologies. FISH remains the single most important technology in cytogenetics. Several innovations are described of which the most important are single copy FISH, in vivo FISH (imaging of nucleic acids in living cells) and nanotechnology-based FISH. The unique character of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) allows these probes to hybridize to target nucleic acid molecules more rapidly and with higher affinity and specificity compared with DNA probes. PNA-FISH is more suited for rapid diagnosis of infections. RNA-FISH and locked nucleic acids (LNAs), are also described. The chapter on markets provides a global perspective of the cytogenetics business in the major markets: US, Western Europe (including France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the UK), and Japan. The total figures for the market are also broken out according to the technologies and major disease areas in which they are applied. Markets figure are given for the year 2015 and estimates are made for the years 2020 and 2025. The report includes summary profiles of 69 companies relevant to cytogenetics along with their 80 collaborations. Companies developing innovative technologies as well as those supplying equipment/services/reagents are identified.The report text is supplemented with 27 Tables and 9 figures. Selected 200 references are included in the bibliography. For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/zfzmjn/cytogenetics

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