Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications

Hangzhou, China

Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications

Hangzhou, China
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Dong L.,Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications | Dong L.,Affiliated Stomatologic Hospital | Cheng K.,Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications | Cheng K.,Affiliated Stomatologic Hospital | And 11 more authors.
ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces | Year: 2017

Stem cells in contact with materials are able to sense their surface features, integrate extracellular matrix (ECM) protein cues through a signal transduction pathway, and ultimately direct cell fate decisions. However, discovering the interdisciplinary mechanisms of how stem cells respond to inherent material surface features still remains a challenge due to the complex, multicomponent signaling milieu present in the ECM environment. Here, we demonstrate that the fate of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can be regulated by the inherent physical cue of the material surface down to atomic-scale features. hMSCs on a TiO-terminated SrTiO3 {110} substrate tend to differentiate into specific lineage cells (osteoblast, chondrocyte, adipocyte), whereas on a TiO2-terminated SrTiO3 {100} substrate they are prone to maintain pluripotency. The experimental observations and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the distinct conformations of the initially adsorbed serum albumin and fibronectin proteins activate the integrin-focal adhesion cytoskeleton actin transduction pathway and, subsequently, direct the gene and protein expressions of hMSCs. Moreover, we demonstrate that the initial protein adsorption behaviors are dependent on the distinct hydroxyl groups originating from different surface atomic structures as well as the work functions. This work, therefore, provides new insights into the fundamental understanding of cell-material interactions and will have a profound impact on further designing materials to direct the stem cell fate. © 2017 American Chemical Society.


Yu M.,Affiliated Stomatologic Hospital | Yu M.,Zhejiang University | Yu M.,Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications | You D.,Affiliated Stomatologic Hospital | And 14 more authors.
ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces | Year: 2017

Two important goals in orthopedic implant research are to promote osseointegration and prevent infection. However, much previous effort has been focused on the design of coatings to either enhance osseointegration while ignoring antibacterial activity or vice versa, to prevent infection while ignoring bone integration. Here, we designed a multifunctional mineralized collagen coating on titanium with the aid of metal-organic framework (MOF) nanocrystals to control the release of naringin, a Chinese herbal medicine that could promote osseointegration and prevent bacterial infection. The attachment, proliferation, osteogenic differentiation, and mineralization of mesenchymal stem cells on the coating were significantly enhanced. Meanwhile, the antibacterial abilities against Staphylococcus aureus were also promoted. Furthermore, release kinetics analysis indicated that the synergistic effect of a primary burst release stage and secondary slow release stage played a critical role in the performance and could be controlled by the relative concentrations of MOF and naringin. This work thus provides a novel strategy to engineer multifunctional orthopedic coatings that can enhance osseointegration and simultaneously inhibit microbial cell growth. © 2017 American Chemical Society.


He Y.-L.,Shaoxing University | He Y.-L.,Zhejiang University | Wu X.-D.,Shaoxing University | Xiang Y.-Q.,Zhejiang University | And 4 more authors.
Steel and Composite Structures | Year: 2017

Hybrid-fiber reinforced concrete (HFRC) may provide much higher tensile and flexural strengths, tensile ductility, and flexural toughness than normal concrete (NC). HFRC slab has outstanding advantages for use as a composite bridge potential deck slab owing to higher tensile strength, ductility and crack resistance. However, there is little information on shear connector associated with HFRC slabs. To investigate the mechanical behavior of the stud shear connectors embedded in HFRC slab, 14 push-out tests (five batches) in HFRC and NC were conducted. It was found that the stud shear connector embedded in HFRC had a better ductility, higher stiffness and a slightly larger shear bearing capacity than those in NC. The experimentally obtained ultimate resistances of the stud shear connectors were also compared against the equations provided by GB50017 2003, ACI 318-112011, AISC 2011, AASHTO LRFD 2010, PCI 2004, and EN 1994-1-1 (2004), and an empirical equation to predict the ultimate shear connector resistance considering the effect of the HFRC slabs was proposed and validated by the experimental data. Curve fitting was performed to find fitting parameters for all tested specimens and idealized load-slip models were obtained for the specimens with HFRC slabs. Copyright © 2017 Techno-Press, Ltd.


Liang X.,Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications | Yi Q.,Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications | Bai S.,Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications | Dai X.,Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications | And 7 more authors.
Nano Letters | Year: 2014

We demonstrate a facile and general strategy based on ligand protection for the synthesis of unstable colloidal nanocrystals by using the synthesis of pure p-type NiO nanocrystals as an example. We find that the introduction of lithium stearate, which is stable in the reaction system and capable of binding to the surface of NiO oxide nanocrystals, can effectively suppress the reactivity of NiO nanocrystals and thus prevent their in situ reduction into Ni. The resulting p-type NiO nanocrystals, a highly demanded hole-transporting and electron-blocking material, are applied to the fabrication of organic solar cells and polymer light-emitting diodes, demonstrating their great potential as an interfacial layer for low-cost and large-area, solution-processed optoelectronic devices. © 2014 American Chemical Society.


Liang X.,Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications | Ren Y.,Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications | Bai S.,Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications | Zhang N.,Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications | And 11 more authors.
Chemistry of Materials | Year: 2014

Transition metal oxides are widely used in solution-processed optoelectronic devices as charge-transporting interlayers to improve contact properties and device performances. Here we show that the work function of oxide nanocrystal thin films, one of the most important parameters for charge-transporting interlayers, is readily tuned by rational design of material synthesis. Mechanism studies reveal that the combination of employing the reverse-injection approach and using zinc stearate and indium 2-ethylhexanoate as the cationic precursors ensures both controlled reaction pathways and balanced relative dopant-host precursor reactivity and hence high-quality indium doped zinc oxide nanocrystals. We find that the empirical rule of relative Lewis acidity fails to predict the relative reactivity of the cationic precursors and quantitative measurements are obligatory. The successful incorporation of indium dopants into host oxide nanocrystals accompanied by the generation of high density of free electrons leads to oxide thin films with lower work function. Polymer light-emitting diodes with electron-transporting interlayers based on the indium doped zinc oxide nanocrystals exhibit improved electron-injection properties and enhanced device characteristics, i.e., lower turn-on voltage, higher maximum luminance, and higher efficiency. Our study is an excellent example that new understanding on the chemical kinetics of doped nanocrystals leads to rational design of synthetic protocols and materials with tailored electronic properties, providing benefits for their optoelectronic applications. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

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