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Barbaric J.,Agency for Quality and Accreditation in Health Care and Social Welfare | Sekerija M.,Croatian Institute of Public Health | Agius D.,Malta National Cancer Registry | Coza D.,Oncological Institute Ion Chiricuta | And 11 more authors.
European Journal of Cancer | Year: 2016

Introduction Most countries in South-Eastern Europe (SEE) have lower incidence, but higher mortality rates of malignant melanoma (MM) of the skin compared to North-Western Europe (NWE). We explored trends in MM incidence and mortality in SEE countries by sex and age and compared them with the trends in NWE. Methods We obtained data on incident cases and deaths from MM (ICD-10 code C43) from 11 population-based cancer registries in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Malta, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia and Turkey. We calculated age-specific rates for 25-49 ('young'), 50-69 ('middle aged') and 70+ years ('older') and estimated the average annual percent of change in incidence and mortality trends 2000-2010 according to age group and sex, using joinpoint regression analysis. Findings The incidence rates of MM across the region were uniformly increasing. Significant increases in mortality rates were observed in middle aged men in Serbia and Bulgaria, middle aged women in Slovenia, older men in the Czech Republic, Serbia and Turkey, and older women in Slovenia and Serbia. Interpretation While MM incidence rates were still increasing across SEE, mortality trends diverged and were less favourable than in NWE. Empowering cancer registration and improving the quality of incidence and mortality data will be essential for monitoring progress in MM control. In the context of prevention of melanoma, disparities in early detection appear to be widening the gap between SEE and NWE, while the provision of care to patients with advanced disease is likely to prove a challenge for regional healthcare budgets. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Karalexi M.A.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens | Papathoma P.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens | Thomopoulos T.P.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens | Ryzhov A.,National Institute of Cancer | And 31 more authors.
European Journal of Cancer | Year: 2015

Aim: Childhood central nervous system (CNS) tumour registration and control programs in Southern and Eastern Europe remain thin, despite the lethal nature of the disease. Mortality/survival data were assembled to estimate the burden of malignant CNS tumours, as well as the potential role of sociodemographic survival determinants across 14 cancer registries of this region. Methods: Average age-adjusted mortality rates were calculated, whereas time trends were quantified through Poisson and Joinpoint regressions. Kaplan-Meier curves were derived for the maximum and the more recent (10 and 5. year) registration periods. Multivariate Cox regression models were used to assess demographic and disease-related determinants. Results: Variations in mortality (8-16 per million) and survival (5-year: 35-69%) were substantial among the participating registries; in most registries mortality trend was stable, whereas Bulgaria, having the highest starting rate, experienced decreasing annual mortality (-2.4%, p = 0.001). A steep decrease in survival rates was evident before the second year of follow-up. After controlling for diagnostic subgroup, age, gender and diagnostic year, Greece seemed to present higher survival compared with the other contributing registries, although the follow-up period was short. Irrespective of country, however, rural residence was found to impose substantial adverse repercussions on survival (hazard ratio (HR): 1.2, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1-1.4). Conclusion: Cross-country mortality and survival variations possibly reflect suboptimal levels of health care delivery and cancer control in some regions of Southern and Eastern Europe, notwithstanding questionable death certification patterns or follow-up procedures. Continuous childhood cancer registration and linkage with clinical data are prerequisite for the reduction of survival inequalities across Europe. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Znaor A.,Croatian National Institute of Public Health | Van Den Hurk C.,Comprehensive Cancer Center South | Primic-Zakelj M.,Oncology Institute | Agius D.,Malta National Cancer Registry | And 9 more authors.
European Journal of Cancer | Year: 2013

Introduction: Cancer registration coverage and cancer control programmes in South Eastern (SE) Europe, embracing about six new EU member states, remain thin, despite a relatively high incidence and mortality burden from avoidable cancers, particularly in males. We assembled the most recent cancer registry data to estimate the burden of the 17 most common cancers in the region, from Slovenia to Cyprus and Malta. Methods: Data were made available for analysis from Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Malta, Romania (Cluj County), Serbia, Slovenia and Turkey (Antalya and Izmir provinces). We analysed incidence and mortality of the 17 most common cancers (counts and age-standardised rates, for the most recent year available and for the period 1999-2008). We used Joinpoint regression to quantify recent trends. Findings: For much of SE Europe, there were no marked declines in overall cancer mortality rates during 1999-2008. In men, lung cancer incidence and mortality rates were high compared to other European countries (age-standardised rates (ASRW) of incidence being 50-60/100,000 in most of the countries), and still increasing in Bulgaria, Serbia and Turkey. Prostate cancer incidence rapidly increased throughout the region by 3-12% annually, largely without any clear declines in mortality. Colorectal cancer incidence increased throughout the region, as did mortality especially in Croatia, Serbia and Bulgaria (average annual percentage change (AAPC) 1.5-2%). In women, breast cancer mortality significantly declined in Slovenia, Croatia and Malta (Average Annual Percentage of Change [AAPC] -2%, -1% and -5%, respectively), but not elsewhere. Cervical cancer incidence rates remained very high in Romania, Serbia and Bulgaria (ASRW > 20/100,000). Interpretation: Our data confirmed the North West to South East Europe gradient of increasing incidence and mortality rates of tobacco-related cancers, as well as increasing mortality rates of screen-detectable cancers. The lack of decline in overall cancer mortality also indicates suboptimal levels of cancer control in the region. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Papathoma P.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens | Thomopoulos T.P.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens | Karalexi M.A.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens | Ryzhov A.,National Institute of Cancer | And 37 more authors.
European Journal of Cancer | Year: 2015

Aim: Following completion of the first 5-year nationwide childhood (0-14 years) registration in Greece, central nervous system (CNS) tumour incidence rates are compared with those of 12 registries operating in 10 Southern-Eastern European countries. Methods: All CNS tumours, as defined by the International Classification of Childhood Cancer (ICCC-3) and registered in any period between 1983 and 2014 were collected from the collaborating cancer registries. Data were evaluated using standard International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) criteria. Crude and age-adjusted incidence rates (AIR) by age/gender/diagnostic subgroup were calculated, whereas time trends were assessed through Poisson and Joinpoint regression models. Results: 6062 CNS tumours were retrieved with non-malignant CNS tumours recorded in eight registries; therefore, the analyses were performed on 5191 malignant tumours. Proportion of death certificate only cases was low and morphologic verification overall high; yet five registries presented >10% unspecified neoplasms. The male/female ratio was 1.3 and incidence decreased gradually with age, apart from Turkey and Ukraine. Overall AIR for malignant tumours was 23/106 children, with the highest rates noted in Croatia and Serbia. A statistically significant AIR increase was noted in Bulgaria, whereas significant decreases were noted in Belarus, Croatia, Cyprus and Serbia. Although astrocytomas were overall the most common subgroup (30%) followed by embryonal tumours (26%), the latter was the predominant subgroup in six registries. Conclusion: Childhood cancer registration is expanding in Southern-Eastern Europe. The heterogeneity in registration practices and incidence patterns of CNS tumours necessitates further investigation aiming to provide clues in aetiology and direct investments into surveillance and early tumour detection. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Papathoma P.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens | Thomopoulos T.P.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens | Karalexi M.A.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens | Ryzhov A.,National Institute of Cancer | And 37 more authors.
European Journal of Cancer | Year: 2015

Aim: Following completion of the first 5-year nationwide childhood (0-14. years) registration in Greece, central nervous system (CNS) tumour incidence rates are compared with those of 12 registries operating in 10 Southern-Eastern European countries. Methods: All CNS tumours, as defined by the International Classification of Childhood Cancer (ICCC-3) and registered in any period between 1983 and 2014 were collected from the collaborating cancer registries. Data were evaluated using standard International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) criteria. Crude and age-adjusted incidence rates (AIR) by age/gender/diagnostic subgroup were calculated, whereas time trends were assessed through Poisson and Joinpoint regression models. Results: 6062 CNS tumours were retrieved with non-malignant CNS tumours recorded in eight registries; therefore, the analyses were performed on 5191 malignant tumours. Proportion of death certificate only cases was low and morphologic verification overall high; yet five registries presented >10% unspecified neoplasms. The male/female ratio was 1.3 and incidence decreased gradually with age, apart from Turkey and Ukraine. Overall AIR for malignant tumours was 23/106 children, with the highest rates noted in Croatia and Serbia. A statistically significant AIR increase was noted in Bulgaria, whereas significant decreases were noted in Belarus, Croatia, Cyprus and Serbia. Although astrocytomas were overall the most common subgroup (30%) followed by embryonal tumours (26%), the latter was the predominant subgroup in six registries. Conclusion: Childhood cancer registration is expanding in Southern-Eastern Europe. The heterogeneity in registration practices and incidence patterns of CNS tumours necessitates further investigation aiming to provide clues in aetiology and direct investments into surveillance and early tumour detection. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Source

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