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News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.npr.org

Doctors Prescribe More Generics When Drug Reps Are Kept At Bay When teaching hospitals put pharmaceutical sales representatives on a shorter leash, their doctors tended to order fewer promoted brand-name drugs and used more generic versions instead, a study published Tuesday in JAMA, the journal of the American Medical Association, shows. The results were significant compared to doctors who worked at hospitals that did not limit sales reps from freely walking their halls or providing meals or gifts, according to research by Ian Larkin, an assistant professor of strategy at the University of California, Los Angeles Anderson School of Management, and colleagues. This issue of JAMA is devoted to conflicts of interest in medicine and includes a viewpoint on what ProPublica has learned by publishing Dollars for Docs, a tool that lets users look up their physicians' payments from drug and medical device companies. Conflicts of interest in medicine have been ubiquitous for years, but a string of lawsuits, coupled with a crackdown by academic medical centers and public disclosure of industry payments, have brought renewed focus on how these relationships affect prescribing. For the past 6½ years, ProPublica has tracked payments to doctors. We've found that some practitioners earn hundreds of thousands of dollars or more each year working with drug and device companies. We've reported how the drugs most aggressively promoted to doctors typically aren't cures or even big medical breakthroughs. And last year we found an association between payments and higher rates of brand-name prescribing, on average. The teaching hospital study focused on 19 centers in five states that restricted visits by drug reps in one or more ways: limiting access, limiting gifts or punishing those who broke the rules. Larkin's team compared prescriptions by 2,126 doctors at those hospitals with 24,593 peers with similar characteristics who were not subject to the marketing limits. It examined more than 16 million prescriptions in total, using data from CVS Caremark, a large pharmacy benefit manager. The researchers found significant changes in six of the eight drug classes studied and at nine of the 19 hospitals reviewed. The policies were put in place at different times from 2006 to 2011, but changes in prescribing started immediately and lasted for 12 to 36 months afterward. Having a policy governing pharmaceutical marketing, known as "detailing," was associated with a 1.67 percentage point decrease in market share for the average promoted drug. Before the policies, the average promoted drug had a market share of 19.3 percent. Those with tougher policies, including an enforcement component, appeared to have more significant results. "These weren't terribly onerous restrictions, yet at the same time, they changed prescribing in a way that has really significant cost implications," Larkin said. Among the centers that did not have statistically significant changes was Stanford University, one of the earliest adopters of restrictive policies. In 2010, ProPublica reported how Stanford was not enforcing its rules limiting the relationships between doctors and drug companies. It has tightened its oversight since. Stanford doctors prescribed fewer promoted drugs but not enough for the result to be significant. Larkin says he was surprised that the policies at some teaching hospitals didn't have as much impact as the researchers expected. "You can't just put in a policy," he says. "You have to think about it carefully, think about the efforts that really matter and involve the [medical] community." The study has several limitations. First, it did not find that the policies caused the change in prescribing, only that there was an association between the two. Also, the study was observational, meaning that doctors were not randomly assigned to hospitals with and without policies. And the study took policies at their word, not looking at their implementation or follow through. Dr. Howard Bauchner, JAMA's editor in chief, said the study helps to crystalize the need to limit pharmaceutical company marketing in teaching hospitals "as a way of ensuring that there's no influence, no inappropriate influence over prescribing." Bauchner says he isn't bothered that the researchers only found significant results in fewer than half of the teaching hospitals studied. "Nothing is ever 100 percent effective," he says. "To me that's no different than a clinical trial. Not everyone benefits." An editorial that accompanies the research suggests that alternative approaches to educating doctors about drugs besides relying on drug company promotion need to be tested. "It has never been more important for physicians to come together to consider these alternatives, generate evidence about their effectiveness, and move the health care system toward solutions that lower costs for patients and minimize" conflicts of interest, write Colette DeJong and Dr. R. Adams Dudley of the University of California, San Francisco.


New research shows that limiting how pharmaceutical sales representatives can market their products to physicians changes their drug prescribing behaviors. A team, led by the University of California, Los Angeles' Ian Larkin and Carnegie Mellon University's George Loewenstein, examined restrictions 19 academic medical centers (AMCs) in five U.S. states placed on pharmaceutical representatives' visits to doctors' offices. Published in the May 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, the results reveal that the restrictions caused physicians to switch from prescribing drugs that were more expensive and patent-protected to generic, significantly cheaper drugs. Pharmaceutical sales representative visits to doctors, known as "detailing," is the most prominent form of pharmaceutical company marketing. Detailing often involves small gifts for physicians and their staff, such as meals. Pharmaceutical companies incur far greater expenditures on detailing visits than they do on direct-to-consumer marketing, or even on research and development of new drugs. Despite the prevalence of detailing and the numerous programs to regulate detailing, little was known about how practice-level detailing restrictions affect physician prescribing, until now. For the study, which is the largest, most comprehensive investigation into the impact of detailing restrictions, the team compared changes in the prescribing behavior of thousands of doctors before and after their AMCs introduced policies restricting detailing with the prescribing behavior of a carefully matched control group of similar physicians practicing in the same geographic regions but not subject to detailing restrictions. In total, the study included 25,000 physicians and 262 drugs in eight major drug classes from statins to sleep aids to antidepressants, representing more than $60 billion in aggregate sales in the U.S. "The study cannot definitively prove a causal link between policies that regulated detailing and changes in physician prescribing, but absent a randomized control, this evidence is as definitive as possible," said Larkin, assistant professor of strategy at UCLA's Anderson School of Management. "We investigated 19 different policy implementations that happened over a six-year period, included a control group of highly similar physicians not subject to detailing restrictions and looked at effects in eight large drug classes. The results were remarkable robust -- after the introduction of policies, about five to 10 percent of physician prescribing behavior changed." Specifically, the researchers found that detailing policies were associated with an 8.7 percent decrease in the market share of the average detailed drug. Before policy implementation, the average drug had a 19.3 percent market share. The findings also suggest that detailing may influence physicians in indirect ways. "No medical center completely barred salesperson visits; salespeople could and did continue to visit physicians at all medical centers in the study," Larkin said. "The most common restriction put in place was a ban on meals and other small gifts. The fact that regulating gifts while still allowing sales calls still led to a switch to cheaper, generic drugs may suggest that gifts such as meals play an important role in influencing physicians. The correlation between meals and prescribing has been well established in the literature, but our study suggests this relationship may be causal in nature." In light of these findings, the study indicates that physician practices and other governing bodies may need to take an active role in regulating conflicts of interest, rather than relying on individual physicians to monitor and regulate. "Social science has long demonstrated that professionals, even well-meaning ones, are powerfully influenced by conflicts of interest," said Loewenstein, the Herbert A. Simon University Professor of Economics and Psychology at CMU. "A large body of research also shows that simply disclosing conflicts of interests is insufficient to reduce their influence, and may even exacerbate it. The results from this study underline the effectiveness of, and need for, centralized rules and regulations. We should not put the onus of dealing with conflicts on patients; the best policies are those that eliminate conflicts." Larkin and Loewenstein also have a Viewpoint article in the same JAMA issue that calls for physicians to be compensated on a salary basis, instead of fee-for-service, to eliminate additional conflicts of interest. In addition to Larkin and Loewenstein, the research team included University of California, San Diego's Desmond Ang; Austrian Institute of Technology's Jonathan Steinhart; Williams College's Matthew Chao; Carnegie Mellon's Mark Patterson; Cornell University's Sunita Sah; New York University's Tina Wu; National Institute of Mental Health's Michael Schoenbaum; David Hutchins and Troyen Brennan from CVS Caremark. The National Institute of Mental Health provided funding, and CVS Caremark provided data, for the study.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.futurity.org

A new study suggests that restricting how pharmaceutical sales representatives can market drugs to physicians changes which medications doctors prescribe to their patients. A team of researchers examined restrictions at 19 academic medical centers (AMCs) in five US states placed on pharmaceutical representatives’ visits to doctors’ offices. Published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, the results suggest that the restrictions caused physicians to switch from prescribing drugs that were more expensive and patent-protected to generic, significantly cheaper drugs. Pharmaceutical sales representative visits to doctors, known as “detailing,” is the most prominent form of pharmaceutical company marketing. Detailing often involves small gifts for physicians and their staff, such as meals. Pharmaceutical companies incur higher costs on detailing visits than on direct-to-consumer marketing, or even on research and development of new drugs. Despite the prevalence of detailing and the numerous programs to regulate detailing, little was known about how practice-level detailing restrictions affect physician prescribing, until now. For the study, which is the largest, most comprehensive investigation into the impact of detailing restrictions, the team compared changes in the prescribing behavior of thousands of doctors before and after their AMCs introduced policies restricting detailing with the prescribing behavior of a carefully matched control group of similar physicians practicing in the same geographic regions but not subject to detailing restrictions. In total, the study included 25,000 physicians and 262 drugs in eight major drug classes from statins to sleep aids to antidepressants, representing more than $60 billion in aggregate sales in the United States. “The study cannot definitively prove a causal link between policies that regulated detailing and changes in physician prescribing, but absent a randomized control, this evidence is as definitive as possible,” says Ian Larkin, assistant professor of strategy at University of California, Los Angeles’ Anderson School of Management and co-leader of the research team. “We investigated 19 different policy implementations that happened over a six-year period, included a control group of highly similar physicians not subject to detailing restrictions and looked at effects in eight large drug classes. The results were remarkable robust—after the introduction of policies, about 5 to 10 percent of physician prescribing behavior changed.” Specifically, the researchers found that detailing policies were associated with an 8.7 percent decrease in the market share of the average detailed drug. Before policy implementation, the average drug had a 19.3 percent market share. The findings also suggest that detailing may influence physicians in indirect ways. “No medical center completely barred salesperson visits; salespeople could and did continue to visit physicians at all medical centers in the study,” Larkin says. “The most common restriction put in place was a ban on meals and other small gifts. The fact that regulating gifts while still allowing sales calls still led to a switch to cheaper, generic drugs may suggest that gifts such as meals play an important role in influencing physicians. “The correlation between meals and prescribing has been well established in the literature, but our study suggests this relationship may be causal in nature.” In light of these findings, the study indicates that physician practices and other governing bodies may need to take an active role in regulating conflicts of interest, rather than relying on individual physicians to monitor and regulate. “Social science has long demonstrated that professionals, even well-meaning ones, are powerfully influenced by conflicts of interest,” says George Loewenstein, a professor of economics and psychology at Carnegie Mellon University and co-leader of the research team. “A large body of research also shows that simply disclosing conflicts of interests is insufficient to reduce their influence, and may even exacerbate it. The results from this study underline the effectiveness of, and need for, centralized rules and regulations. We should not put the onus of dealing with conflicts on patients; the best policies are those that eliminate conflicts.” Larkin and Loewenstein also have a Viewpoint article in the same JAMA issue that calls for physicians to be compensated on a salary basis, instead of fee-for-service, to eliminate additional conflicts of interest. The National Institute of Mental Health provided funding and CVS Caremark provided data for the study.


WOONSOCKET, R.I., Nov. 2, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- CVS Health (NYSE: CVS) announced today that pharmacy benefits manager CVS Caremark has earned URAC accreditations in Health Call Center for its Pharmacy Advisor® counseling program as well as in Pharmacy Benefit Management and Drug Therapy...


News Article | December 15, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.com

-Secures Formulary Status with CVS Caremark for YOSPRALA™ MISSISSAUGA, Ontario, Dec. 15, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Aralez Pharmaceuticals Inc. (NASDAQ: ARLZ) (TSX: ARZ) ("Aralez" or the "Company") today announced that it has entered into a rebate agreement with CaremarkPCS Health (also...


News Article | December 23, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Many Americans will be shocked in January when they are told to pay more for a single pill than they used to pay for an entire month’s supply of their medication due to formulary changes being made by major pharmacy benefits managers. Often, however, these drugs are already available from licensed pharmacies outside the U.S. at prices 74% lower on average than in the U.S., according to an analysis by PharmacyChecker.com. “If you are unable to switch to another drug and can’t afford the new price, be aware that the same drugs are available online at much lower cost from licensed pharmacies in other countries,” said Tod Cooperman, M.D., CEO of PharmacyChecker.com. The antidepressant Effexor XR (75 mg), for example, which is being dropped by CVS Caremark, costs about $11 per pill in the U.S. Licensed pharmacies sell the same pill for $3.25 in Canada, $1.80 in the UK, and just 65 cents in Turkey. 10 Drugs Being Dropped by Insurers in 2017 -- U.S. vs. Canada Prices Xenazine (Tetrabenazine) 25 mg cost 94.86 per pill in the U.S. vs. $6.86 in Canada Nexium (Omeprazole Magnesium) 40mg cost $6.90 per pill in the U.S. vs. $2.87 in Canada Crestor (Rosuvastatin - 10mg cost $6.82 per pill in the U.S. vs $2.58 in Canada Effexor XR (Venalfaxine) - 75mg cost $10.96 per pill in the U.S. vs. $3.25 in Canada Abilify (Aripiprazole) - 5mg cost $29.88 per pill in the U.S. vs. $7.54 in Canada Pradaxa (Dabigatan) - 150 mg cost $5.94 per pill in the U.S. vs. $3.13 in Canada Tasigna (Nilotinib) Dose Pack - 150mg cost $93.84 per pill in the U.S. vs. $35.57 in Canada Ventolin HFA (Albuterol) inhaler - 90 mcg cost $73.19 per pill in the U.S. vs. $35.10 in Canada Zyclara Pump (Imiquimod) - 3.75%* cost $1,040.83 per pill in the U.S. vs. $414.75 in Canada Xtandi (Enzalutamide) - 40mg cost $77.84 per pill in the U.S. vs. $40.50 in Canada For all prices in analysis see: https://www.pharmacychecker.com/news/medications-dropped-from-pbms-2017-cost-less-outside-u.s.asp. Sources: List based on formulary exclusions announced by CVS Caremark, except for Zyclara, which is being excluded by Express Scripts; U.S. prices shown are lowest prices from licensed pharmacies in Brooklyn, NY. Prices for other countries are from PharmacyChecker.com Verified Pharmacies, which require a valid prescription. The largest potential savings -- 97% -- is for Xenazine (tetrabenazine), a drug that treats involuntary movements caused by Huntington’s Disease. In the U.S., the price is about $95 per pill, compared to $1.87 in New Zealand. According to a recent poll by the Kaiser Family Foundation, about 19 million Americans report importing a medication for personal use, but the practice, according to the FDA, remains illegal under most circumstances. Lawfully manufactured medications imported for personal use from Canada and other countries are considered unapproved by the FDA. FDA spokesperson Christopher Kelly states, "FDA is not aware of any actions taken against an individual resulting from their purchase of small quantities of unapproved drugs for personal use." [1] PharmacyChecker.com, founded in 2002, provides consumers with information to assess and compare online pharmacies and save money on medication. For more information, contact Gabriel Levitt, President, PharmacyChecker.com at 718-387-4526 or gabriel.levitt(at)pharmacychecker(dot)com. [1] “Should You Use an Overseas Pharmacy,” MoneyTalksNews.com, 2/1/2013. See http://www.moneytalksnews.com/is-it-safe-to-use-an-overseas-pharmacy/.


News Article | December 15, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

ATLANTA & DALLAS & PHOENIX--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Columbia Property Trust, Inc. (NYSE: CXP) today announced that it has exited the Dallas and Phoenix markets with the recent sales of two office properties: CVS Health Tower, a Class-A office building located at 750 W. John Carpenter Freeway in the suburb of Irving, Texas, and SanTan Corporate Center, a Class-A office property located at 3100 and 3200 West Ray Road in Chandler, Arizona. Columbia will use the $109.5 million in total gross proceeds from both sales for reinvestment in its target markets. CVS Health Tower comprises 315,000 square feet and is primarily leased to the building’s namesake, CVS Caremark, a major independent pharmacy benefit management provider, and technology leader IBM. Located in Irving’s popular Las Colinas District, the 12-story office building was built in 1999 and acquired by Columbia in 2006, at which time it was known as the Sterling Commerce building. SanTan Corporate Center consists of two office buildings with a combined 267,000 square feet. Built in 2000 and 2003 and acquired by Columbia in 2006, both buildings are 100 percent leased. SanTan Corporate Center I is fully occupied by Toyota Financial Services, which recently signed a lease renewal to remain at the property through 2024. SanTan Corporate Center II is leased to multiple tenants, including Dialog Semiconductor, a UK-based manufacturer of semiconductor-based system solutions, and Isola USA, part of the global material sciences company Isola Group. “We completed successful leasing programs at both these properties over the last several months, which, combined with their respective locations in solid metro submarkets, positioned each to attract high demand among potential buyers,” said Nelson Mills, president and CEO of Columbia Property Trust. “We felt the time was right to realize the value of these assets and exit both markets as we continue to sharpen our focus on a select group of CBD, high-barrier markets.” With this sale, Columbia has successfully completed $660.5 million of dispositions in 2016, as part of its previously announced plan to sell roughly $700 million to $1 billion of non-core assets this year. About Columbia Property Trust Columbia Property Trust (NYSE: CXP) owns and operates Class-A office buildings in competitive, primarily CBD locations, and over half our investments are in high-barrier-to-entry, primary markets. Our portfolio includes 21 office properties containing nearly 11 million square feet and one hotel, concentrated in San Francisco, New York, and Washington, D.C. For more information about Columbia, which carries an investment-grade rating from both Moody’s and Standard & Poor’s, please visit columbia.reit. Forward-Looking Statements: Certain statements contained in this press release other than historical facts may be considered forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. We intend for all such forward-looking statements to be covered by the applicable safe harbor provisions for forward-looking statements contained in those acts. Such statements include, in particular, statements about our plans, strategies, and prospects and are subject to certain risks and uncertainties, including known and unknown risks, which could cause actual results to differ materially from those projected or anticipated. Therefore, such statements are not intended to be a guarantee of our performance in future periods. Such forward-looking statements can generally be identified by our use of forward-looking terminology such as “may,” “will,” “expect,” “intend,” “anticipate,” “estimate,” “believe,” “continue,” or other similar words. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this press release. We make no representations or warranties (express or implied) about the accuracy of any such forward-looking statements contained in this press release, and we do not intend to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events, or otherwise. Any such forward-looking statements are subject to risks, uncertainties, and other factors and are based on a number of assumptions involving judgments with respect to, among other things, future economic, competitive, and market conditions, all of which are difficult or impossible to predict accurately. To the extent that our assumptions differ from actual conditions, our ability to accurately anticipate results expressed in such forward-looking statements, including our ability to generate positive cash flow from operations, make distributions to stockholders, and maintain the value of our real estate properties, may be significantly hindered. See Item 1A in the Company’s most recently filed Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2015, for a discussion of some of the risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those presented in our forward-looking statements. The risk factors described in our Annual Report are not the only ones we face, but do represent those risks and uncertainties that we believe are material to us. Additional risks and uncertainties not currently known to us or that we currently deem immaterial may also harm our business.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

MVP Systems Software, Inc., a leading provider of enterprise job scheduling and workload automation software, will demonstrate JAMS V6.5 and its comprehensive Microsoft platform and application integrations at Microsoft Ignite Australia 2017, February 14 – 17 at the Gold Coast Convention & Exhibition Centre in Broadbeach, Queensland. Ignite Australia 2017 brings together the region’s leading IT professionals, IT decision makers and enterprise developers to discover new solutions and network with community experts. Visit MVP Systems Software in the Partner Community at booth #1 to learn more about JAMS and the company. The JAMS team will offer hands-on demonstrations of its scheduling and automation capabilities for a wide array of Microsoft products including Windows Server, SQL Server, and Dynamics AX. Engineers will also introduce developers to the many ways JAMS automation can be leveraged in custom .NET applications and through custom JAMS PowerShell cmdlets. “We’re excited to return to Ignite because the Microsoft community has discovered ways to leverage JAMS across so many points of critical enterprise workflows,” says Robert Musca, MVP’s Business Development Manager for the Asia Pacific region. “Our local customer base has experienced growth of more than 50% in the last year. At this year's event, Microsoft customers who have implemented or are exploring Azure infrastructure will have an opportunity to see cross-platform automation with the JAMS Virtual Machine, a certified Azure Marketplace solution.” More than 1,000 organizations worldwide rely on MVP’s workload automation solution, JAMS, to execute, manage, monitor, and report on their most critical batch processes. Through a comprehensive .NET API and REST API, developers in the Microsoft community can integrate powerful and reliable automation directly into custom applications. MVP Systems Software is a certified Microsoft Gold Development Partner. Azure customers can learn more about the benefits of the JAMS Virtual Machine, which is available through Microsoft’s Azure Marketplace. About JAMS JAMS is the only job scheduling system built on a .NET framework and is the first enterprise job scheduling system that can be leveraged by both IT Operations Personnel and Application Developers. With its roots in Windows, JAMS also supports running processes across a variety of operating systems (UNIX, Linux, System i, OpenVMS, etc.) and applications (PeopleSoft, SAP, SQL, Oracle, Symitar, Ecometry, etc.) To learn more about JAMS, please visit http://www.JAMSScheduler.com or call 800-261-JAMS. About MVP Systems Software, Inc. For more than 20 years, MVP Systems Software, Inc. has provided leading-edge batch job scheduling and workload automation solutions to more than 1,000 customers. Customers include household names such as Bank of America, CVS Caremark, Sirius XM, Villanova University, Vizio, and Yum! Brands. MVP’s solutions are available for all models of IT architecture, from physical servers to virtualized and hybrid environments. You can learn more about MVP Systems Software at http://www.jamsscheduler.com/company/about-mvp/ MVP Systems Software, Inc. and all other MVP Systems Software product or service names are registered trademarks or trademarks of MVP Systems Software, Inc. All other trademarks or registered trademarks belong to their respective companies. © 2017, MVP Systems Software, Inc. All rights reserved.


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

Thirty-Year Biotechnology and Pharmacy Veteran Joins Therigy Team in Aligning Strategies, Relationships, and Technology to Maximize Stakeholder Outcomes ​​​​​As specialty pharmacy continues to evolve with access to new medications, major mergers and acquisitions, accreditation changes, and an influx of new healthcare organizations entering the marketplace, the industry is reaching new heights in growth potential. This growth makes the alignment of biotech and specialty therapy strategies, relationships, and technology more important than ever before for delivering the best possible patient and business outcomes. Therigy®, the leader in specialty pharmacy consulting and developer of TherigySTM™, the pharmacy industry’s leading specialty therapy management software platform, understands this and has appointed biotech and pharmacy veteran, Scot Buchanan, as its Vice President of Biotech and Specialty Services. In his role at Therigy, Buchanan is responsible for the management of pharma-facing business activities, which includes strategic direction of biopharma opportunities, oversight of pharma operations, pharma consulting services, business and market development, and pharma data product and service line development. “From our earliest years in specialty pharmacy, Therigy has always recognized the importance of aligning biotech strategies and best practices, industry relationships, and technology in specialty pharmacy. These areas of expertise must be integrated to successfully harness specialty pharmacy growth, and enhance patient and business outcomes,” said Russel Allinson, RPh, MS, Therigy’s CEO and Chief Clinical Officer. “With Scot, Therigy has gained a seasoned veteran in all of these areas, who has the vision and the proven background to cultivate and implement these practices and relationships, all of which creates more value for all of our specialty pharmacy stakeholders.” Buchanan joined Therigy as a 30-year veteran in the biotechnology and pharmacy industry. Prior to his appointment at Therigy, he served as Vice President of Manufacturer Relations at AmerisourceBergen. There, he directed the company’s enterprise-wide account management team to drive growth in partnership opportunities with pharmaceutical manufacturers. This growth included the development of cross-enterprise opportunities for specialty distribution, specialty pharmacy, full-line wholesaling, and variety of patient and consulting services. Before this, as Vice President of Supply Chain Strategy, Buchanan was responsible for product sourcing negotiations, all while growing new and existing business for the company’s Specialty Group. In addition to his tenure with AmerisourceBergen, Buchanan served in business development and sales leadership roles at CVS Caremark, AstraZeneca, and Merck. Buchanan earned his Bachelor of Arts degree from Baylor University with an emphasis on business. Therigy is the trusted source for innovative, best-in-class software and expert consulting services to the specialty pharmaceutical market. Clients leverage Therigy’s solutions, data, and insights to achieve clinical and economic success by aligning strategy, technology, and people. Learn more about Therigy at www.therigy.com. Follow Therigy on LinkedIn and Twitter. TherigySTM is used by leading specialty pharmacies to provide superior care and therapy-specific clinical support, maximize adherence, and improve outcomes.  The application allows for accurate and reliable data collection and outcomes reporting.  The product easily integrates with pharmacy dispensing systems.  Most importantly, Therigy has configured more than 253 clinical assessments into TherigySTM to provide a turnkey application that requires little if any additional clinical development by the subscriber. To our knowledge, TherigySTM is the only pharmacy care management system on the market which is pre-configured with clinical content and for which the subscription price includes regular releases of new content for new drugs, new indications, and changes to prescribing information.  In addition, Therigy has created the capability for easy customization of content and even complete protocols by the subscriber.


Receive press releases from iHealthcareAnalyst, Inc.: By Email Global Online Pharmacies Market Analysis: Geography, Growth Trends and Forecast to 2020, New Findings by iHealthcareAnalyst, Inc. Online Pharmacies Market by Geography – North America (U.S., Canada), Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, Rest of LA), Europe (U.K., Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Rest of EU), Asia Pacific (Japan, China, India, Rest of APAC), and Rest of the World 2016-2020. Maryland Heights, MO, February 25, 2017 --( Browse Online Pharmacies Market by Geography – North America (U.S., Canada), Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, Rest of LA), Europe (U.K., Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Rest of EU), Asia Pacific (Japan, China, India, Rest of APAC), and Rest of the World 2016-2020 at https://www.ihealthcareanalyst.com/report/online-pharmacies-market/. An online pharmacy, Internet pharmacy, e-pharmacy or mail-order pharmacy is a pharmacy that operate over the Internet and sends the orders to customers through the mail or shipping companies. Most attractive feature of online pharmacies is drug prices. Customers can sometimes obtain 50 to 80 percent or more savings on U.S. drugs and medicines prices at foreign pharmacies. Independent research published by the National Bureau of Economic Research demonstrates that online pharmacies, U.S. and foreign, verified by certain credentialing entities, sell genuine medication and require a prescription. It further states that, all tested prescription drug orders were found to be authentic when ordered from online pharmacies, international and U.S.-only, approved by PharmacyChecker.com, as well as U.S. online pharmacies approved by the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy (NABP), Verified Internet Pharmacy Practice Sites (VIPPS) program or LegitScript, whereas 90 percent of tested products ordered from non-credentialed online pharmacies were counterfeit. The global online pharmacies market is segmented by geography into North America (U.S., Canada), Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, Rest of LA), Europe (U.K., Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Rest of EU), Asia Pacific (Japan, China, India, Rest of APAC), and Rest of the World. The global online pharmacies market report provides market size (Revenue USD Million 2013 to 2020), market share and forecasts growth trends (CAGR%, 2016 to 2020). The global online pharmacies market research report is further segmented by geography into North America (U.S., Canada), Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, Rest of LA), Europe (U.K., Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Rest of EU), Asia Pacific (Japan, China, India, Rest of APAC), and Rest of the World. The global online pharmacies market report also provides the detailed market landscape (market drivers, restraints, opportunities), market attractiveness analysis and profiles of major competitors in the global market including company overview, financial snapshot, key products, technologies and services offered, and recent developments. Major players operating in the global online pharmacies market and profiled in this report include Banner Health, CVS Caremark, DocMorris NV, Dr. Fox Pharmacy, eDrugstore.MD, Lloyds Pharmacy Ltd., MediSave, PlanetRX.com Inc., Rowlands Pharmacy, and Walgreen Co. To request Table of Contents and Sample Pages of this report visit: https://www.ihealthcareanalyst.com/report/online-pharmacies-market/ About Us iHealthcareAnalyst, Inc. is a global healthcare market research and consulting company providing market analysis, and competitive intelligence services to global clients. The company publishes syndicate, custom and consulting grade healthcare reports covering animal healthcare, biotechnology, clinical diagnostics, healthcare informatics, healthcare services, medical devices, medical equipment, and pharmaceuticals. In addition to multi-client studies, we offer creative consulting services and conduct proprietary single-client assignments targeted at client’s specific business objectives, information needs, time frame and budget. Please contact us to receive a proposal for a proprietary single-client study. Contact Us iHealthcareAnalyst, Inc. 2109, Mckelvey Hill Drive Maryland Heights, MO 63043 United States Email: sales@ihealthcareanalyst.com Website: https://www.ihealthcareanalyst.com Maryland Heights, MO, February 25, 2017 --( PR.com )-- The global online pharmacies market is estimated to reach USD 65.5 Billion by 2020, growing at a CAGR of 17.4% from 2016 to 2020.Browse Online Pharmacies Market by Geography – North America (U.S., Canada), Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, Rest of LA), Europe (U.K., Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Rest of EU), Asia Pacific (Japan, China, India, Rest of APAC), and Rest of the World 2016-2020 at https://www.ihealthcareanalyst.com/report/online-pharmacies-market/.An online pharmacy, Internet pharmacy, e-pharmacy or mail-order pharmacy is a pharmacy that operate over the Internet and sends the orders to customers through the mail or shipping companies. Most attractive feature of online pharmacies is drug prices. Customers can sometimes obtain 50 to 80 percent or more savings on U.S. drugs and medicines prices at foreign pharmacies. Independent research published by the National Bureau of Economic Research demonstrates that online pharmacies, U.S. and foreign, verified by certain credentialing entities, sell genuine medication and require a prescription. It further states that, all tested prescription drug orders were found to be authentic when ordered from online pharmacies, international and U.S.-only, approved by PharmacyChecker.com, as well as U.S. online pharmacies approved by the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy (NABP), Verified Internet Pharmacy Practice Sites (VIPPS) program or LegitScript, whereas 90 percent of tested products ordered from non-credentialed online pharmacies were counterfeit.The global online pharmacies market is segmented by geography into North America (U.S., Canada), Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, Rest of LA), Europe (U.K., Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Rest of EU), Asia Pacific (Japan, China, India, Rest of APAC), and Rest of the World.The global online pharmacies market report provides market size (Revenue USD Million 2013 to 2020), market share and forecasts growth trends (CAGR%, 2016 to 2020). The global online pharmacies market research report is further segmented by geography into North America (U.S., Canada), Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, Rest of LA), Europe (U.K., Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Rest of EU), Asia Pacific (Japan, China, India, Rest of APAC), and Rest of the World. The global online pharmacies market report also provides the detailed market landscape (market drivers, restraints, opportunities), market attractiveness analysis and profiles of major competitors in the global market including company overview, financial snapshot, key products, technologies and services offered, and recent developments.Major players operating in the global online pharmacies market and profiled in this report include Banner Health, CVS Caremark, DocMorris NV, Dr. Fox Pharmacy, eDrugstore.MD, Lloyds Pharmacy Ltd., MediSave, PlanetRX.com Inc., Rowlands Pharmacy, and Walgreen Co.To request Table of Contents and Sample Pages of this report visit: https://www.ihealthcareanalyst.com/report/online-pharmacies-market/About UsiHealthcareAnalyst, Inc. is a global healthcare market research and consulting company providing market analysis, and competitive intelligence services to global clients. The company publishes syndicate, custom and consulting grade healthcare reports covering animal healthcare, biotechnology, clinical diagnostics, healthcare informatics, healthcare services, medical devices, medical equipment, and pharmaceuticals.In addition to multi-client studies, we offer creative consulting services and conduct proprietary single-client assignments targeted at client’s specific business objectives, information needs, time frame and budget. Please contact us to receive a proposal for a proprietary single-client study.Contact UsiHealthcareAnalyst, Inc.2109, Mckelvey Hill DriveMaryland Heights, MO 63043United StatesEmail: sales@ihealthcareanalyst.comWebsite: https://www.ihealthcareanalyst.com Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from iHealthcareAnalyst, Inc.

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