United States
United States

Time filter

Source Type

News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: www.scientificcomputing.com

This year many mobile carriers are launching early services for 5G -- the next generation of wireless that promises speeds 10 to 100 times faster than 4G LTE -- and a host of other technology companies are testing devices and systems for the Internet of Things that will depend on this coming glut in capacity. To make research and development for 5G and other revolutionary applications of wireless communications easier, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) today launched a new web portal that lets researchers apply for a program experimental license. The new application system reduces barriers to experimentation for universities, research laboratories, health care institutions, and manufacturers with demonstrated experience in radio frequency technology, and provides an overarching licensing program for innovative entities to rapidly acquire specific experimental licenses on an ongoing, as-needed basis in designated campus areas. (FCC Public Notice and Announcement) NYU WIRELESS, a world leading academic research center in wireless communications located in NYU's Tandon School of engineering, is a pioneer in establishing millimeter-wave (mmWave) technology as a core part of the world's 5G vision, and was one of only two academic institutions --The University of Colorado Boulder (CU Boulder) is the other -- working with the FCC to help test, debug, and provide feedback on the web-based licensing system. NYU WIRELESS became the first applicant to receive the program experimental license using the new portal. "The license will allow the center to do cutting-edge work throughout the spectrum, not just at frequencies critical to 5G, but also far beyond," said Theodore (Ted) Rappaport, Founding Director of NYU WIRELESS and the David Lee/Ernst Weber Professor of Electrical Engineering at the New York University Tandon School of Engineering. He added that the FCC's new program experimental licensing process is perhaps the first like it in the world, and it promises to reduce the waiting time and burden for innovators to experiment in the radio spectrum, allowing experimenters to focus on science and engineering while giving a rapid, 15-day turnaround on experimental license decisions in most cases. "We believe massively broadband mobile communications will eventually migrate to both lower and higher frequency ranges, and we are honored that the FCC chose NYU to be one of two academic institutions to test the portal for usability and accuracy to help pave the way for our wireless future," Rappaport said. "The efficiency and transparency of the new FCC experimental program portal will aid institutions like ours -- as well as governmental spectrum holders and corporations-- to accelerate experimentation of new systems and devices that will eventually become part of our interconnected world. I am particularly grateful to doctoral electrical engineering student Yunchou Xing, who worked closely with the FCC staff as a beta tester for the new portal. His work illustrates the unusual role that NYU WIRELESS has embraced to expand the potential of wireless communications: Not only through fundamental research, modeling and experimentation, but also by building an ecosystem of industrial affiliate sponsors committed to expanding the wireless frontier and working with governments and agencies such as the FCC toward a better wireless future." Xing, an electrical and computer engineering doctoral student at NYU WIRELESS in NYU Tandon, helped the FCC test two websites within the experimental license platform: the FCC Office of Engineering and Technology's Experimental Licensing System, for which he verified log-in and application procedures; and the new Experiments Notification System, which lets a program experimental licensee alert others of plans to conduct research within a particular radio band within a particular geographic region. This feature of transparency allows entities that hold licenses in those bands -- as well as those who stand to be affected by the applicant's research -- to object or to comment. "The FCC's move today launches a new tool that will hopefully reduce the wait time for government authorization to do cutting-edge research and experimental transmissions," said Rappaport. The Office of Engineering and Technology grants more than 2,000 requests for experimental licenses annually, to more than 600 universities, researchers, businesses, and other innovators, according to Julius Knapp, Chief of the FCC Office of Engineering and Technology. "This year alone we have over 35 experimental licenses that have a 5G focus or are in the bands raised in the Spectrum Frontiers proceeding," said Knapp, referring to the conference that led to rules expediting 5G technology. In July 2016, the FCC unanimously adopted the "Spectrum Frontier" rules for wireless broadband operations in frequencies above 24 GHz, making the United States the first country in the world to make this spectrum available for next generation wireless services, thereby quadrupling the amount of spectrum for wireless providers. NYU WIRELESS played a leading role in proving the viability of mmWave spectrum for future mobile communications. To speed the development of 5G, NYU WIRELESS last year launched the first open-access mmWave channel simulator software (NYUSIM) with a complete statistical spatial channel model, which is based on the research group's experiments showing the channel characteristics at mmWave frequencies.


News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: www.scientificcomputing.com

This year many mobile carriers are launching early services for 5G -- the next generation of wireless that promises speeds 10 to 100 times faster than 4G LTE -- and a host of other technology companies are testing devices and systems for the Internet of Things that will depend on this coming glut in capacity. To make research and development for 5G and other revolutionary applications of wireless communications easier, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) today launched a new web portal that lets researchers apply for a program experimental license. The new application system reduces barriers to experimentation for universities, research laboratories, health care institutions, and manufacturers with demonstrated experience in radio frequency technology, and provides an overarching licensing program for innovative entities to rapidly acquire specific experimental licenses on an ongoing, as-needed basis in designated campus areas. (FCC Public Notice and Announcement) NYU WIRELESS, a world leading academic research center in wireless communications located in NYU's Tandon School of engineering, is a pioneer in establishing millimeter-wave (mmWave) technology as a core part of the world's 5G vision, and was one of only two academic institutions --The University of Colorado Boulder (CU Boulder) is the other -- working with the FCC to help test, debug, and provide feedback on the web-based licensing system. NYU WIRELESS became the first applicant to receive the program experimental license using the new portal. "The license will allow the center to do cutting-edge work throughout the spectrum, not just at frequencies critical to 5G, but also far beyond," said Theodore (Ted) Rappaport, Founding Director of NYU WIRELESS and the David Lee/Ernst Weber Professor of Electrical Engineering at the New York University Tandon School of Engineering. He added that the FCC's new program experimental licensing process is perhaps the first like it in the world, and it promises to reduce the waiting time and burden for innovators to experiment in the radio spectrum, allowing experimenters to focus on science and engineering while giving a rapid, 15-day turnaround on experimental license decisions in most cases. "We believe massively broadband mobile communications will eventually migrate to both lower and higher frequency ranges, and we are honored that the FCC chose NYU to be one of two academic institutions to test the portal for usability and accuracy to help pave the way for our wireless future," Rappaport said. "The efficiency and transparency of the new FCC experimental program portal will aid institutions like ours -- as well as governmental spectrum holders and corporations-- to accelerate experimentation of new systems and devices that will eventually become part of our interconnected world. I am particularly grateful to doctoral electrical engineering student Yunchou Xing, who worked closely with the FCC staff as a beta tester for the new portal. His work illustrates the unusual role that NYU WIRELESS has embraced to expand the potential of wireless communications: Not only through fundamental research, modeling and experimentation, but also by building an ecosystem of industrial affiliate sponsors committed to expanding the wireless frontier and working with governments and agencies such as the FCC toward a better wireless future." Xing, an electrical and computer engineering doctoral student at NYU WIRELESS in NYU Tandon, helped the FCC test two websites within the experimental license platform: the FCC Office of Engineering and Technology's Experimental Licensing System, for which he verified log-in and application procedures; and the new Experiments Notification System, which lets a program experimental licensee alert others of plans to conduct research within a particular radio band within a particular geographic region. This feature of transparency allows entities that hold licenses in those bands -- as well as those who stand to be affected by the applicant's research -- to object or to comment. "The FCC's move today launches a new tool that will hopefully reduce the wait time for government authorization to do cutting-edge research and experimental transmissions," said Rappaport. The Office of Engineering and Technology grants more than 2,000 requests for experimental licenses annually, to more than 600 universities, researchers, businesses, and other innovators, according to Julius Knapp, Chief of the FCC Office of Engineering and Technology. "This year alone we have over 35 experimental licenses that have a 5G focus or are in the bands raised in the Spectrum Frontiers proceeding," said Knapp, referring to the conference that led to rules expediting 5G technology. In July 2016, the FCC unanimously adopted the "Spectrum Frontier" rules for wireless broadband operations in frequencies above 24 GHz, making the United States the first country in the world to make this spectrum available for next generation wireless services, thereby quadrupling the amount of spectrum for wireless providers. NYU WIRELESS played a leading role in proving the viability of mmWave spectrum for future mobile communications. To speed the development of 5G, NYU WIRELESS last year launched the first open-access mmWave channel simulator software (NYUSIM) with a complete statistical spatial channel model, which is based on the research group's experiments showing the channel characteristics at mmWave frequencies.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

NexusTek, a leading Denver-based managed IT services and business software consulting services firm, announced today the names of the NexusTek Tech Scholarship winners for 2017. Marco Ramos was chosen to receive the Grand Prize – a $10,000 scholarship and Madison Younker was awarded the $5,000 scholarship. NexusTek has raised more than $35,000 in three years for their Tech Scholars program. Four out of the five winners are first generation college attendees. Applicants for this scholarship are college-bound, high school seniors in financial need that are seeking a degree in science, technology, and engineering with plans to attend a Colorado college or university. “Our 2017 scholarship recipients, Marco and Madison, stood out from the many highly-motivated, hard-working student applicants for the tech scholarship,” said Mike Jenner, CEO of NexusTek. NexusTek’s $10,000 award recipient, Marco Ramos, was born in Greeley, Colorado. He moved to the rural community of Cope, Colorado where he spent his formative years as the son of a dairy farmer. Life changed dramatically when Marco’s mother and brother were taken in a tragic accident. Marco’s story is one of change, perseverance and strong family values. As the first in his family to go to college, Marcos is very excited to attend CU Boulder in the fall to study electrical engineering. The $5,000 Technology Scholarship Award went to Madison Younker, also a Colorado native born and raised in Grand Junction. Madison describes herself as a “pretty well-rounded kid” and is very grateful for lessons learned during some difficult times during high school. Very active in sports, the 6-foot tall 18-year-old has ambitions to make a difference in the fast-paced world of technology with a double major in computer science and civil engineering. Madison will be attending Colorado State University in the fall. NexusTek Tech Scholars The scholarship applicants submit a comprehensive application and finalists undergo a stringent interview process from members of the selection committee, led by BBB Foundation Board. Each student was honored and formally presented with their scholarships on May 11th at the BBB Foundation event Elevating Ethics Scholarship Award Ceremony & Panel, hosted by Regis University. About NexusTek NexusTek, an award-winning Microsoft Gold Partner, provides small and medium-sized businesses a trusted resource to optimize and manage their IT environments, ensuring business continuity and driving productivity. From managed IT services to cloud solutions and customized business software implementations, NexusTek employs top talent, offers personalized attention, and brings nearly 20 years implementing technology best practices for companies across Colorado and the region. For more information visit http://www.nexustek.com/ About the BBB Foundation The Denver/Boulder BBB Foundation is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit dedicated to supporting tomorrow’s marketplace and the future of the Denver/Boulder business community. It is the philanthropic arm of the Denver/Boulder Better Business Bureau and provides ethics education and opportunities for students and youth.


News Article | February 11, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Researchers from the University of Colorado Boulder have developed a new material capable of cooling structures without water and energy consumption even if they are directly under sunlight. In a study published in the journal Science, Xiaobo Yin and colleagues described their work, saying the new material can be an eco-friendly cooling method for thermoelectric power plants that require massive amounts of water and electricity to meet ideal temperatures for operating machinery. According to the researchers, the metamaterial is applied as film on a surface, efficiently cooling the structure underneath by reflecting solar energy while letting the surface release its own heat at the same time as infrared thermal radiation. A hybrid of glass and polymer, the new material is only as thick as 50 micrometers, which makes it just a little thicker than aluminum foil. And because it is thin, it can also be manufactured into rolls, allowing economical but large-scale use in both commercial and residential structures. "We feel that this low-cost manufacturing process will be transformative for real-world applications of this radiative cooling technology," Yin said. The new material works by making the most of passive radiative cooling, which is the process by which an object sheds heat naturally as infrared radiation without using energy. Some level of natural cooling at night can be expected from thermal radiation and it is used in some areas to cool residential properties. Daytime cooling, however, is more challenging, what with the slightest amount of solar energy directly absorbed enough to render passive radiation ineffective. The researchers' challenge then was to come up with a material that does two things at the same time: reflect incoming energy from the sun and provide a way for infrared radiation to escape. To meet their goal, Yin and colleagues embedded glass microspheres that visibly scatter but radiate infrared light into polymer film. A thin coating of silver was then added underneath to deliver optimal spectral reflectance. According to Gang Tan, one of the study's authors, just 108 to 215 square feet of the new material on a rooftop can be effective in cooling down a single-family house during summer. Aside from cooling power plants and buildings, however, it can also be used to maximize the life span and efficiency of solar panels. Yin said applying the new material to solar panels can cool down panels and recover a percent or two of solar efficiency. Though they are designed to harness energy from the sun, solar panels can heat up, which reduces their solar energy-conversion ability. The researchers are also looking at agriculture and aerospace as potential areas of application. A patent application for the new material has been submitted and the researchers are working with the Technology Transfer Office at CU Boulder to explore possible commercial opportunities. This year, they are also planning on creating a prototype for a "cooling farm." The new material is the result of a 2015 grant awarded to Yin, Tan, and Ronggui Yang, also one of the study's authors, worth $3 million by the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy of the Department of Energy. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A potentially life-saving treatment for sepsis has been under our noses for decades in the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) most people have in their medicine cabinets, a new University of Colorado Boulder study suggests. Each year more than 1 million people in the United States contract sepsis, an overwhelming immune response to infection. It kills as many as half of those who contract it, sometimes within days, according to the National Institutes of Health. As the number of cases rises, particularly in intensive care units, pharmaceutical companies have been scrambling to develop a drug to combat the condition. "NSAIDS like ibuprofen and aspirin are among the most prevalent pharmaceuticals worldwide, with over 30 billion doses taken annually in the United States alone. But their precise mechanisms of action are not entirely understood," said Hang Hubert Yin, a biochemistry professor at CU Boulder's BioFrontiers Institute and lead author of the new paper, published today in Cell Chemical Biology. "We provide the first evidence for a novel mechanism of action for NSAIDS, one we believe could have a direct impact on people's lives." Researchers have long known that NSAIDs work in part by inhibiting an enzyme called cyclooxygenase (COX). They've also known that these NSAIDs can come with serious side effects. Some NSAIDs have been removed from the market after showing they boosted risk of heart attack and stroke. But Yin's research found that a subgroup of NSAIDs also act strongly and independently on another family of enzymes, caspases, which reside deep within the cell and have recently been found to play a key role in aggressive immune responses, like sepsis. "For instance, some chemicals derived from bacteria actually penetrate the cell and trigger the caspase response, prompting the cell to commit suicide. This also is known as apoptosis," said Yin. "Such activation, in turn, potentially causes inflammation." After the disappointing failure of late-stage clinical trials of anti-sepsis drugs targeting an immune receptor called toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), located on the surface of cells, Yin and other scientists began to wonder if the key to halting the disease was to develop an antiseptic therapy that simultaneously targets caspases. As a first step, his team screened 1,280 existing FDA-approved drugs for caspase-inhibiting activity. Of the 27 that lit up, half were NSAIDs. NSAIDs also comprised eight of the top 10 most potent caspase inhibitors. "It was a complete surprise," said Yin. He and study co-author Ding Xue, a professor in the department of Molecular Cellular and Developmental Biology, then used biochemical and biophysical assays in the lab, as well as experiments with roundworms to test the theory further. "We showed that NSAIDs were effective in delaying cell death in worms, presumably by blocking caspase activity." It remains questionable whether existing NSAIDs, perhaps in higher doses, could be used to treat sepsis. The risk of side effects may be too great, said Yin. But he is already working on follow-up studies looking at whether new sepsis drugs could be developed combining caspase-inhibiting NSAIDS and TLR4 inhibitors. NSAIDs could also potentially be repurposed to address other conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis and neuro-degenerative diseases. "To think about the wide potential applications of these NSAID drugs is very exciting," Yin said. He hopes the research will also help scientists better understand why NSAIDs cause serious side effects like liver, kidney and cardiovascular problems, so they can develop safer next-generations versions. The National Institutes of Health funded the study.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Pain is a signal of actual or potential damage to the body, so it is natural to think of it as a localized sensation: knee pain in the knee, back pain in the back and so on. However, research has demonstrated that pain is an experience constructed in the brain. A knee doesn't "feel" anything. Instead, it sends signals to the brain. Input from the body is important, but a person's pain experience also depends on the brain's interpretation of what the input signal means. Scientists are just beginning to study these complex cerebral processes, and in a promising step forward, University of Colorado Boulder researchers have developed a functional MRI-based model that identifies brain activity patterns involved in varied pain experience, even when the input from the body is held constant. "Pain is more than just a passive response to stimuli. The brain actively contributes to pain, constructing it through various neural systems," said Choong-Wan Woo, lead author and a post-doctoral researcher in CU Boulder's Institute of Cognitive Science when the research was completed. "Thus, we wanted to build a brain-based model to predict pain using variables beyond the painful stimuli." For the study, researchers began by aggregating data from six independent brain imaging studies, deliberately choosing those with differing methodologies. In all of the studies, participants had been exposed to several seconds' worth of a painful stimulus and asked to rate their pain while inside an MRI scanner that recorded brain activity. From the data, the researchers were able to identify common markers in the brain that were predictive of a participant's different pain experiences when external stimuli are matched on intensity, resulting in fine-grained mapping of both positively correlated ("pro-pain") and negatively correlated ("anti-pain") brain sub-regions. Comprising part of the new model, those markers several brain regions that are not classically considered important for pain. However, the regions -- which include the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and hippocampus -- are involved in the brain's assessment of the meaning of painful and non-painful events alike. The researchers named their telltale brain pattern the Stimulus Intensity Independent Pain Signature-1 (SIIPS1), a preliminary roadmap that can now be tested and refined in future studies. "We now have a model that can be applied to other basic and clinical pain research in the field," said Woo, who is now beginning an Assistant Professorship at Sungkyunkwan University in South Korea. "We deliberately added the number one to the name because we don't think this is the only brain signature related to pain and expect that more will be developed." The SIIPS1 may provide researchers with a new understanding of chronic pain and hypersensitivity to pain, potentially paving the way for the development of clinical applications and more effective treatments. "There is increasing evidence that chronic pain often involves changes in brain areas identified in our model," said Tor Wager, a professor in CU Boulder's Department of Psychology and Neuroscience and the study's senior author. "The SIIPS1 provides a template for systematic evaluation of how these areas are altered in chronic pain. We hope that it will improve our understanding of chronic pain and lead to the development of new options for preventing and treating this complex disease." The study was published today in the journal Nature Communications. In addition to Woo and Wager, co-authors of the new research include Liane Schmidt of Ecole Normale Supérieure (France); Anjali Krishnan of Brooklyn College of the City University of New York; Marieke Jepma of Leiden University (Netherlands); Mathieu Roy of McGill University (Canada); Martin Lindquist of Johns Hopkins University; and Lauren Atlas of the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health and the National Institute on Drug Abuse.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

After 16 successful summers in Greeley, Colorado, US Sports Camps is pleased to announce that Nike Swim Camps for kids will be hosted at the University of Colorado Boulder this coming summer. Two sessions will be offered at the University of Colorado Swim Camp with overnight, extended day camp (9:00am-9:00pm) and day camp (9:00am-4:00pm) options available for ages 9-18. "Directing the Nike Swim Camp at CU Boulder will be Kelly McClanahan (Session I) and Brendon Bray (Session II)," said Swim National Director, Paul Merrion. "CU Boulder offers a beautiful campus with top-notch facilities that is a perfect location for camp." Located only 30 minutes outside Denver with an elevation of 5,430, competitive swimmers from Colorado and beyond can train and improve their strokes at the CU Recreation Center, a 25 yard x 8 lane pool located in the middle of campus. Designed for competitive swimmers to improve and refine their stroke technique, the Nike Swim Camp at the University of Colorado, Boulder will give athletes the mental, technical, and physical conditioning essential to maximize their swimming potential. "We have a great staff in place this summer," notes camp director Brendon Bray, "that will create a positive environment, provide campers with ongoing and constructive feedback with the hope that we can engage and inspire these young swimmers." For additional details or to register online, visit http://www.ussportscamps.com/swim or call 1-800-NIKE-CAMP. US Sports Camps (USSC), headquartered in San Rafael, California, is America's largest sports camp network and the licensed operator of NIKE Sports Camps. The company has offered summer camps since 1975 with the same mission that defines it today: to shape a lifelong enjoyment of athletics through high quality sports education and skill enhancement.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Colorado session of The Goalie School will run June 1-4 and will be held on the beautiful campus of the University of Colorado Boulder, located at the foot of the Rocky Mountains, just north of Denver. One session of boys and girls camp will have an overnight option with a commuter (Extended Day Camp 9:00 AM to 8:00 PM) option available. Directing the TGS Colorado camp this summer at CU Boulder is Bill Pilat. Coach Pilat states, "I have put together the most innovative curriculum for goalies wishing to improve their skills. Individual analysis, extensive videotaping of each goalie and new methods of teaching techniques and footwork are all elements of the Goalie School." He goes on to comment, "Campers from Utah, New Mexico, Wyoming, Nebraska and Kansas can now attend one of the best lacrosse camps in the country." This camp limits enrollment to ensure maximum teaching and playing for all Goalies. Players, Coaches, Parents and others interested in the 2017 Lacrosse Camps can visit http://www.ussportscamps.com/lacrosse or call 1-800-645-3226. US Sports Camps (USSC), headquartered in San Rafael, California, is America’s largest sports camp network and the licensed operator of Nike Sports Camps. Over 80,000 kids attended a US Sports Camps program in 2016. The company has offered summer camps since 1975 with the same mission that defines it today: to shape a lifelong enjoyment of athletics through high-quality sports education and skill enhancement.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Scientific evidence that the assortment of gut microbes in humans influences different and critical aspects of health is piling up: Researchers think our microbes may influence obesity, anxiety, depression, autism, cancer and gastrointestinal diseases. A possible addition to the list: University of Colorado Boulder researchers recently reported preliminary evidence that changes in gut microbiota in mice contribute to poor artery health with aging. This condition is worsened by eating a "Western diet" high in fat and sugars and low in fiber. Artery dysfunction is the main reason our risk of developing cardiovascular diseases increases markedly as we age, said CU Boulder Professor Douglas Seals. The Seals lab also has preliminary results showing that regular aerobic exercise may prevent the negative effects of both aging and lifelong consumption of a Western diet on artery health in mice. Now, thanks to a four-year $3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, Seals, postdoctoral fellow Vienna Brunt of the Department of Integrated Physiology and their team are deep-diving into the role of microbiota on arteries in both mice and humans. Their initial experiments show that treatment with a broad-spectrum antibiotic "cocktail" that eliminates much of the existing gut microbes reverses arterial dysfunction in old mice. The two types of arterial dysfunction that develop with aging and cause increased risk of cardiovascular disease are the stiffening of some large arteries, and damage to the inner lining of the arteries, said Seals. Both changes are driven by oxidative stress (the excessive production of damaging "reactive oxygen species") and chronic, low-grade vascular inflammation, which develops in our arteries as we age. "These two changes are conspiring partners that feed off each other, stimulating one another in a vicious cycle," said Seals. While the researchers don't yet know what causes oxidative stress and inflammation to develop with aging, recent work in Seal's lab suggests gut bacteria affected by aging may in turn change the types of chemicals, known as metabolites, that they produce. "We believe the altered chemicals produced by gut bacteria with aging move from inside the intestines through a 'leaky gut' wall - also caused by aging - and enter the bloodstream," said Brunt. "Then they circulate and interact with the walls of the arteries to cause oxidative stress, inflammation and arterial dysfunction." Part one of the new study will include mouse-to-mouse transplants in which gut microbiota will be transferred between mice differing in age, diet or exercise status to see if it induces changes in arterial function, said Brunt, who is overseeing day-to-day project operations. If successful, the study will provide important evidence that changes in the gut microbiome with aging are linked to increased cardiovascular risk, she said. The second part of the study will be a clinical trial in about 120 adults divided into four groups: younger, older, exercising and non-exercising. Participants will change between eating a healthy diet and a Western-style diet to induce changes in the gut microbiome while their arterial function is monitored. Part three of the study is to use a "humanized" mouse model in which stool samples containing gut microbiota from human subjects will be given to mice. The experiment will involve former CU Boulder Professor Rob Knight, now at the University of California San Diego, and will determine if characteristics present in human gut microbes with age, Western diet and exercise predictably influence arterial function. The expected results have the potential to establish the gut microbiome as a key mechanism and therapeutic target for age-related arterial dysfunction, said Seals. The study also should help the team identify lifestyle or pharmacological strategies that may preserve microbial health, enhance arterial function and reduce the risk of age-related cardiovascular disease. The team includes University of Michigan medical student Rachel Gioscia-Ryan, who conducted key preliminary experiments as part of her doctorate under Seals at CU Boulder. The study is funded by NIH's National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

A new report from the Center on Reinventing Public Education states its goals as strengthening the evidence base on state-initiated turnarounds and providing guidance to help states use turnaround strategies more effectively. But given multiple methodological limitations, the report fails to elevate either the research base or the policy discourse. Betty Malen and Jennifer King Rice, professors at the University of Maryland, reviewed Measures of Last Resort: Assessing Strategies for State-Initiated Turnarounds for the Think Twice Think Tank Review Project at the National Education Policy Center, housed at CU Boulder’s School of Education. The report draws on multiple sources of information to accomplish three related goals: (a) to develop a conceptual framework and profile of state-initiated turnaround strategies, (b) to array the evidence on the effectiveness of turnaround initiatives, and (c) to identify key elements of a successful turnaround strategy. But the report suffers from methodological limitations that severely undermine its usefulness. Specifically, the methods used to carry out the original research are neither well-described nor justified. This unexplained research involved analysis of state policies, interviews with stakeholders, and illustrative cases. Likewise, the methods employed in the eight evaluations selected to assess the effectiveness of turnaround approaches are not described, and the evidence base produced by these evaluations is insufficient to support the sweeping claims made in the report. Equally important, explain Professors Malen and Rice, the report neglects to consider relevant research on the specific mechanisms (e.g., school reconstitution, intensive professional development, and private management systems) that states use when they employ the broad turnaround strategies discussed in the report. As a result of these problems, the report neither enhances the evidence base nor provides the substantive guidance state policymakers require to make informed decisions about the use of various school turnaround strategies. Find Measures of Last Resort: Assessing Strategies for State-Initiated Turnarounds, by Ashley Jochim, published by the Center for Reinventing Public Education, at: https://crpe.org/sites/default/files/crpe-measures-last-resort.pdf The National Education Policy Center (NEPC) Think Twice Think Tank Review Project (http://thinktankreview.org) provides the public, policymakers, and the press with timely, academically sound reviews of selected publications. The project is made possible in part by support provided by the Great Lakes Center for Education Research and Practice: http://www.greatlakescenter.org The National Education Policy Center (NEPC), housed at the University of Colorado Boulder School of Education, produces and disseminates high-quality, peer-reviewed research to inform education policy discussions. Visit us at: http://nepc.colorado.edu

Loading CU Boulder collaborators
Loading CU Boulder collaborators