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Champaign, IL, United States

Jin H.,University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign | Mangun C.L.,CU Aerospace, LLC | Griffin A.S.,University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign | Moore J.S.,University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign | And 2 more authors.
Advanced Materials | Year: 2014

Self-healing is achieved with a dual-microcapsule system utilizing epoxy-amine chemistry in a high temperature cured thermosetting epoxy polymer. One capsule contains a modified aliphatic polyamine prepared by vacuum infiltration of polyoxypropylenetriamine into hollow polymeric microcapsules. The second capsule contains a difunctional epoxide and reactive diluent. Healing efficiency is accessed through recovery of fracture toughness and excellent long-term stability at ambient conditions is demonstrated. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Source


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2014

ABSTRACT: CU Aerospace (CUA) and team partner the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) propose to perform research, development and demonstration of experimental quenching free measurements of heat-release in a realistic highly turbulent plasma-assisted flame. Kinetics models will be correspondingly updated and detailed 3D multiphysics simulations will be validated by the measurements. Current diagnostic tools are difficult to implement for 2D measurements of intermediate species to support the modeling and physical understanding of these complex processes. To fill this technology gap, this proposal introduces innovations that will produce the higher precision diagnostic techniques and greatly enhance knowledge of these plasmadynamic and chemical kinetic phenomena. This SBIR effort will lead to aircraft engine design improvements that will provide enhanced combustion efficiency, reignition and flame holding for very high altitude, high-speed flight in Phase II of this program. These enhancements and understanding will have major implications for the expansion of aircraft mission envelopes, and our goal is to jointly develop with UIUC these diagnostic and software tools of choice for the industry. BENEFIT: The Phase I results will lay the foundation to develop a prototype diagnostic and modeling suite for comprehensive development and testing in the Phase II program. Incorporating the Phase I diagnostic techniques along with Air Force guidance for most desired features, the diagnostic and software suite will be enhanced and tested extensively in Phase II as a product demonstration unit. Applications of the developed approach include next generation warfighters capable of flying at higher altitudes and/or higher speeds, and technologies that would be used by engine manufacturers for the development of high-altitude propulsion systems, possibly enabling low-cost to space access via hybrid hypersonic launch. Commercial applications that utilize control of plasma enhanced combustion have the potential to fundamentally bring transformative changes to our combustion-based energy infrastructure by providing (1) the potential for flexible and broad integration of alternative fuels and plasma technology in our everyday lives; (2) more powerful and energy efficient combustion systems for power generation and transportation; (3) reduction of harmful pollutants in our environment; (4) improvements in national security from fuel blends with less dependence on foreign oil, and (5) a more sustainable and efficient energy infrastructure. Furthermore, plasma assisted chemistry could have broader impact in many other areas where it is beneficial to manipulate species content and reaction pathways, including plasma assisted processing of materials, environmental remediation of waste streams such as from smokestacks, and plasma lighting. The Phase II goal will initially be to optimize the diagnostic and software, and design features for Air Force specifications, followed by optimization for more commercial programs.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.99K | Year: 2015

ABSTRACT: CU Aerospace (CUA) and team partner the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) propose to perform research, development and demonstration of experimental quenching free measurements of heat-release in a realistic highly turbulent plasma-assisted flame. Kinetics models will be correspondingly updated and detailed 3D multiphysics simulations will be validated by the measurements. Current diagnostic tools are difficult to implement for 2D measurements of intermediate species to support the modeling and physical understanding of these complex processes. To fill this technology gap, this proposal implements innovative diagnostic techniques that will significantly increase measurement precision and greatly enhance knowledge of these plasmadynamic and chemical kinetic phenomena. This SBIR effort will lead to aircraft engine design improvements that will provide enhanced combustion stability and efficiency, reignition and flame holding for very high altitude, high-speed flight in Phase II of this program. These enhancements and understanding will have major implications for the expansion of aircraft mission envelopes, and our goal is to jointly develop with UIUC these diagnostic and software tools of choice for the industry.; BENEFIT: The Phase I results laid the foundation to develop a prototype diagnostic and modeling suite for comprehensive development and testing in the Phase II program. Incorporating the Phase I diagnostic techniques along with Air Force guidance for most desired features, the diagnostic and software suite will be enhanced and tested extensively in Phase II as a product demonstration unit. Applications of the developed approach include next generation warfighters capable of flying at higher altitudes and/or higher speeds, and technologies that would be used by engine manufacturers for the development of high-altitude propulsion systems, possibly enabling low-cost to space access via hybrid hypersonic launch. Commercial applications that utilize control of plasma enhanced combustion have the potential to fundamentally bring transformative changes to our combustion-based energy infrastructure by providing (1) the potential for flexible and broad integration of alternative fuels and plasma technology in our everyday lives; (2) more powerful and energy efficient combustion systems for power generation and transportation; (3) reduction of harmful pollutants in our environment; (4) improvements in national security from fuel blends with less dependence on foreign oil, and (5) a more sustainable and efficient energy infrastructure. Furthermore, plasma assisted chemistry could have broader impact in many other areas where it is beneficial to manipulate species content and reaction pathways, including plasma assisted processing of materials, environmental remediation of waste streams such as from smokestacks, and plasma lighting. The Phase II goal will initially be to optimize the diagnostic and software, and design features for Air Force specifications, followed by optimization for more commercial programs.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 80.00K | Year: 2015

CU Aerospace (CUA), teamed with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), proposes to research, develop, and demonstrate thermal management simulation tools for next-generation two-phase cooling systems designed for transient high heat-flux naval applications. The software developed in this program can be used to evaluate advanced thermal management designs for critical emerging naval electronics applications (e.g. radar, railguns, and directed-energy). The improved heat transfer, increased power density, and reduced packaging size achievable with two-phase designs are advantageous when compared to single-phase cooling (e.g. water flow). However, active control features are required to address temperature variation, thermal lag, flow instabilities, and critical heat flux not found in current state-of-the-art single-phase systems. Addressing this, the proposed program introduces innovative tools for simulating two-phase systems which can serve as an industry standard for evaluating and optimizing naval thermal management designs. Phase I efforts will focus on component model development and preliminary experimental validation, serving as a basis for advanced multiple-cold-plate architecture pursued in Phase II. The toolset produced in this program will have major implications for the future designs of two-phase thermal management systems in warships, offering a comprehensive approach for reducing size, weight, and power consumption, while improving thermal load handling.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 80.00K | Year: 2014

The primary objective of CU Aerospace"s (CUA) Phase I work will be to fabricate and test aromatic thermosetting copolyester (ATSP) composites for use as ablative thermal protection systems for next generation reentry bodies. Unfortunately, there has been little work put into the development of improved ablative materials over the last 30 years, most of the current TPS are based on"new"designs using the same heritage materials (some of which are no longer being manufactured). The synthetic development of novel ATSP was a major innovation in the field of polymer science. Only recently has this material been considered as a viable ablative due to its high temperature stability and excellent composite mechanical properties especially due to the liquid crystalline nature of the polymer, which allows a matching of CTE between fiber and matrix to diminish residual stresses. CUA will carry out a systematic study of the mechanical/thermal properties of ATSP composites and our major aerospace team partner will provide plasma jet testing for this project along with data analysis and evaluation against current ablative materials including carbon/phenolic.

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