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Richter A.,CTE
Cutting Tool Engineering | Year: 2012

Coolant recycling systems extend the life of coolant but only an integrated coolant recovery system will return like-new fluid of the highest quality back to the machine tools. The role of coolant recycling equipment is to remove the tramp oil, particulates and bacteria, returning the coolant to like-new condition and enabling it to have a long life. The tramp oil resides in the rag, or cream, layer at the top of the coolant. In addition to a bag filter that removes suspended solids, coolant recycling system has a barrel skimmer that sits below the coolant surface and a double-diaphragm air pump that pulls the coolant and rag layer into the tramp oil separator. In the separator's first chamber, the layer of tramp oil rises to the top and is extracted through a weir. When using recycled coolant from a central system involving multiple machines producing the same component, it's critical that the fluid delivered to each machine is at the same pressure, level of cleanliness, concentration and temperature to achieve application consistency.


Woods S.,CTE
Cutting Tool Engineering | Year: 2012

Shops looking to optimize their processes should master the basics of bandsaw or a circular saw, whichever they are using. The bandsaw is a versatile machine that can be used for many different applications. For people who production-cut a variety of materials, a bandsaw is a good choice. A circular saw has the ability to cut much faster than a bandsaw and provide a more accurate cut with a better finish. Both saw types are available in manual, semi and fully automatic models. Semiautomatic saws are for shops running different lengths of material and generally smaller quantities. Automatic saws allow companies that have high quantities of the same size to run efficiently. Coolant plays a major role in band and circular sawing. It keeps the saw blade cool and lubricates the face and gullets of the teeth so the chips will form easily in the gullet area and be carried out of the cut and drop off into a chip bin or be knocked off by a blade brush. Maintaining the proper tension on a bandsaw blade keeps it rigid and straight in the cut, preventing deflection.


Richter A.,CTE
Cutting Tool Engineering | Year: 2011

The strategies of various companies involved in manufacturing parts for the growing US nuclear energy industry are presented. L&S Machine Co. LLC, Latrobe, Pa., generates about three-quarters of its business machining parts for the expanding nuclear energy industry. The company produces nuclear parts on 3-, 4- and 5-axis Haas machines, which are pieces of equipment for nuclear applications because the nickel-base alloy parts can not be contaminated by contacting materials from other workpieces, such as cast iron, aluminum and copper. Lindquist Machine Corp., a Green Bay, Wis., uses the horizontal boring mill to produce specialized fabricated bases, frames, weldments and castings. East Tech Co., another manufacturer machining parts for the nuclear energy industry, makes parts made of various workpiece materials, including 304 stainless, 4140 alloy steel prehardened to 28 to 32 HRC.


Isakov E.,CTE
Cutting Tool Engineering | Year: 2011

Cutting time for facing is calculated with the help of the lathe operations calculator that calculates time for facing as a function of the constant rpm, workpiece diameter, and feed per revolution. In CNC machines, most operations, including facing, are programmed using constant cutting speed, which is specified in sfm in inch mode or m/min. in metric mode. The advantages of constant surface speed are that it simplifies programming, provides consistent workpiece finish, optimizes tool life, and optimizes machining time. A formula is developed in Microsoft Excel and a calculator is designed for required cutting time when facing at constant cutting speed. Its computational worksheet is shown and the required values for computation of the cutting time are entered. A similar calculator based on constant rpm, and feed rate and rpm instead of the cutting speed is shown.


Effectively drilling stacks, which have multiple layers of composites and metals, takes the right combination of tool and machining parameters. The Dreamliner, for example, is made up of 50 percent composite, 20 percent aluminum, 15 percent titanium, 10 percent steel and 5 percent other materials. Aircraft manufacturers like stack materials because they combine metal's high strength with composite's low weight and corrosion resistance. The variety of stack materials is increasing nearly as fast as the applications. National Center for Defense Manufacturing and Machining (NCDMM) takes sample stacks sent to them by defense manufacturers and develops the best hole-making process for the materials. Engineers rarely see anything but test panels and for proprietary reasons may have only a generic idea of the materials making up the stack, which makes the task of developing optimal drilling processes all the more challenging.

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