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Oak Ridge, TN, United States

Martovetsky N.N.,Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | Berryhill A.B.,Cryomagnetics Inc. | Kenney S.J.,Oak Ridge National Laboratory
IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity | Year: 2012

The ITER Central Solenoid has 36 interpancake joints, 12 bus joints, and 12 feeder joints in the magnet. The joints are required to have resistance below 4 nOhm at 45 kA at 4.5 K. The US ITER Project Office developed two different types of interpancake joints with some variations in details in order to find a better design, qualify the joints, and establish a fabrication process. © 2002-2011 IEEE. Source


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 81.32K | Year: 2004

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The development of a cryogen-free, actively-shielded 7.0 T high-resolution superconducting magnet for Ion Cyclotron Resonance Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry (ICR-FTMS) will significantly reduce system operating


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.85K | Year: 2004

Superconducting coils are capable of storing considerable amounts of energy. Should a coil quench, due to overheating or exceeding the critical field or current carrying ability of the wire, the stored energy in the coil must be dissipated safely - without endangering personnel or damaging the coil or control systems. In any superconducting coil design, it is essential to design and build the system such that the limits of the materials involved are not exceeded. High temperature superconductors (HTS) are relatively new to applications in magnets and coils, but are rapidly growing in use thanks to advances in conductor performance and availability. However, not much is known currently concerning the quench protection design limits of the materials. Thus far, quench protection in high temperature superconducting coils has been largely overlooked. This has mainly been due to the fact that HTS materials have higher heat capacities at their operating points, and are often difficult to quench. Unfortunately this high heat capacity also creates slow propagation velocities which can cause catastrophic damage to the HTS. New methods for quench protection in HTS coils will be analyzed via computer simulation.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 86.00K | Year: 1999

Not Available This Phase I SBIR program will define and architect a Bandwidth-Efficient, Low-Latency, Scalable Turbo Architecture (BELLSTAR) for detailed FPGA design and implementation during a Phase II SBIR development. The design will focus on a flexible, modular architecture that can be used as both a developmental tool and as a stepping stone toward new generations of high density, low-cost turbo encoder/decoder chips with an appropriate mix of capabilities. As a development tool, the BELLSTAR will provide an open architecture for the analysis, test, and demonstration of the very high coding gains achievable at relatively low latencies for the appropriate data rates and modulation types. Follow-on developments will allow the appropriate mixture of open-architecture components to be reduced using MCM, ASIC, and other novel packaging technologies to produce small, high-density, low-cost turbo codecs for both the military and commercial marketplace. BENEFITS: Potential applications of the architecture, techniques, and components developed on this project include: satellite communications, wireless communications, cable modems, Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) modems, voice-band modems, and most digital data communication applications that can tolerate latency in return for high coding gains. The developmental test-bed can be used as laboratory test equipment for new techniques in more advanced turbo-coding products and applications.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 443.69K | Year: 2005

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The development of a cryogen-free, actively-shielded 7.0 T high resolution superconducting magnet for Ion Cyclotron Resonance Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry (ICR-FTMS) will significantly reduce system operating costs, improve operator safety, and simplify operation and maintenance. Bio-scientists and genetic researchers rely more and more on ICR-FTMS. The proposed FTMS actively-shielded magnet system will have many technological merits: ultra high resolution, low system operating costs (no cryogen refilling will be required to operate the system), user-friendliness (using closed cycle refrigeration, CCR, the magnet portion of the spectrometer becomes almost maintenance free), compact size (due to the active shielding, the system can fit into a small laboratory, and the cryostat will be much smaller since no cryogen storage volume is necessary), flexibility and mobility (no cryogen requirement means problems with cryogen access and availability will no longer pose siting limitations).

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