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Jūnāgadh, India

Holajjer P.,Indian Agricultural Research Institute | Holajjer P.,Crop Protection Unit | Kamra A.,Indian Agricultural Research Institute | Gaur H.S.,Indian Agricultural Research Institute | Dhar D.W.,Indian Agricultural Research Institute
Nematology | Year: 2012

The nematicidal activity of a terrestrial cyanobacterium, Synechococcus nidulans, was investigated. Extracts of S. nidulans cultures collected at weekly intervals for 5 weeks were sonicated and tested against second-stage juveniles (J2) of Meloidogyne incognita. Extracts of 2-week-old cultures caused the maximum immobility (94.2%) and mortality (29.3%) of J2, compared with controls (medium and water). This extract was tested In vitro against infective stages and hatch of M. graminicola, Heterodera cajani, H. avenae and Rotylenchulus reniformis. Extracts of sonicated S. nidulans caused a mean immobility in the range of 91.3-98.4% in infective stages of the nematodes, with no significant difference with an increase in exposure time from 24 to 72 h. The greatest mean percentage mortality was observed in M. graminicola (31.5%) followed by M. incognita (29.3%), H. avenae (20.9%), and R. reniformis and H. cajani (both 17.4%) with a significant increase with the period of exposure from 24 to 72 h. No significant differences in mortality were observed between M. graminicola and M. incognita and between H. avenae and H. cajani. The percentage hatch inhibition over control (water) was greatest in M. incognita (94.2%), followed by H. avenae (91.6%), H. cajani (72.3%) and M. graminicola (70.6%), and least in R. reniformis (58.6%). © 2012 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands. Source


Gupta R.K.,Sher-e-Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences and Technology | Gani M.,Sher-e-Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences and Technology | Jasrotia P.,Sher-e-Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences and Technology | Jasrotia P.,Crop Protection Unit | Srivastava K.,Sher-e-Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences and Technology
BioControl | Year: 2013

The present work aimed to determine the impact of nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) on the development of Eocanthecona furcellata Wolff and to measure the infectivity of NPV discharged through its faeces. Developmental time, survival rate, sex ratio and incubation period of the predator reared on different proportions of healthy and NPV infected S. litura larvae as lifetime meal did not vary significantly. However, when the proportion of infected prey in the predator's lifetime meal exceeded 50 % significant reductions in body weight, fecundity, longevity and percent egg hatchability were noticed. The virus did not show detrimental effect on the developmental biology of the predator in the subsequent generations when offspring emerging from nymphs fed only on virus infected prey throughout their life were reared on 50 % of infected prey. Therefore, adverse effects on E. furcellata are unlikely in the field as the predator is not expected to consume more than 50 % of infected prey even if the virus application is done at recommended dose. Under field conditions, it was found that increased proportions of infected prey enhanced the dissemination of viral inoculum through the faeces of the predators and the subsequent infection in S. litura larvae ranged from 22 to 52 %. © 2013 International Organization for Biological Control (IOBC). Source


Harish G.,Directorate of Groundnut Research DGR | Harish G.,Crop Protection Unit | Nataraja M.V.,Directorate of Groundnut Research DGR | Ajay B.C.,Directorate of Groundnut Research DGR | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Food Science and Technology | Year: 2014

Groundnut during storage is attacked by number of stored grain pests and management of these insect pests particularly bruchid beetle, Caryedon serratus (Oliver) is of prime importance as they directly damage the pod and kernels. In this regard different storage bags that could be used and duration up to which we can store groundnut has been studied. Super grain bag recorded minimum number of eggs laid and less damage and minimum weight loss in pods and kernels in comparison to other storage bags. Analysis of variance for multiple regression models were found to be significant in all bags for variables viz, number of eggs laid, damage in pods and kernels, weight loss in pods and kernels throughout the season. Multiple comparison results showed that there was a high probability of eggs laid and pod damage in lino bag, fertilizer bag and gunny bag, whereas super grain bag was found to be more effective in managing the C. serratus owing to very low air circulation. © 2013, Association of Food Scientists & Technologists (India). Source


Nataraja M.V.,Crop Protection Unit | Harish G.,Crop Protection Unit | Holajjer P.,Crop Protection Unit | Savaliya S.D.,Crop Protection Unit
Legume Research | Year: 2016

The bio-efficacy of imidacloprid seed treatment against leafhopper and thrips of groundnut was studied during kharif (23rd to 42nd standard week) and summer (5th to 23rd standard week) cropping seasons of 2010 and 2011. The six different concentrations viz., 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 and 5.0 g a. i. kg-1 were tested for their bio-efficacy. A modified sweep net method was followed to record the leafhopper and thrips populations. Seed treatments with imidacloprid @ 2.0 to 5.0 g a. i. kg-1 were found most effective in reducing the insect population. However, seed treatment with imidacloprid @ 2.0 g a. i. kg-1 may be included in integrated pest management (IPM) package for groundnut from environmental safety point. © 2016, Agricultural Research Communication Centre. All rights reserved. Source


Harish G.,Crop Protection Unit | Nataraja M.V.,Crop Protection Unit | Holajjer P.,Crop Protection Unit | Thirumalaisamy P.P.,Crop Protection Unit | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Food Science and Technology | Year: 2012

During storage groundnut is attacked by number of stored grain pest and management of these insect pests particularly bruchid beetle, Caryedon serratus (Oliver) is of prime importance as they directly damage the pod and kernels. Hence, some essential oils were tested for their insecticidal and fungicidal properties. Highest total bruchid mortality was recorded with the application of neem oil and pongamia oil at 10% (v/w) concentration and lowest in eucalyptus oil at 5% (v/w). Number of eggs laid was recorded 2.3 in neem oil 10% (v/w) which was lowest and significantly superior over untreated control and was at par with castor oil 10% (v/w) which recorded 2.5 eggs per 100 g of groundnut pods. There was no adult emergence in the groundnut pods treated with castor oil, eucalyptus oil, neem oil and pongamia oil at 10% (v/w) concentration. Groundnut pods treated with castor oil, eucalyptus oil, neem oil and pongamia oil at 10% (v/w) and neem oil at 5% (v/w) concentrations recorded no damage to pods and kernels and also zero per cent weight loss. These oils effectively influenced groundnut bruchid establishment and reduce damage besides reduction in aflatoxin contamination. © 2012, Association of Food Scientists & Technologists (India). Source

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