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Wiseguyreports.Com Adds “Agriculture Custom Software Services -Market Demand, Growth, Opportunities and Analysis of Top Key Player Forecast To 2022” To Its Research Database In this report, the USA Agriculture Software Services market is valued at USD XX million in 2016 and is expected to reach USD XX million by the end of 2022, growing at a CAGR of XX% between 2016 and 2022. The research report on the US Agriculture Custom Software Services market studies the market in the past based on which estimates are presented for the future. The report looks into vital market indicators, trends, and opportunities that will have a bearing on the development of this market. The report begins with an outline of terms and terminologies, classifications, and applications that are standard conventions in the US Agriculture Custom Software Services market. A glance into the industry chain structure and industry statutes that govern this industry are presented herein. Following this, operational parameters of the Agriculture Custom Software Services market such as manufacturing processes, product catalog, and cost structures are discussed at length in this report. This, in turn, helps to understand production capacity, product pricing and profit, and demand and supply gap for new entities interested in participating in the US Agriculture Custom Software Services market. This analysis is also indicative how operational aspects of the US Agriculture Custom Software Services market will impact the development of the market until the end of the forecast period. The report discusses the competitive landscape of the US Agriculture Custom Software Services market at length. The major companies that have a significant presence in this market are profiled for business attributes such as financial standing, production capacity, and SWOTs. Each of these companies is studied with reference to a timescale, in order to comprehend the changing competitive hierarchy of the US Agriculture Custom Software Services market over the past few years. The report is compiled in a chapter-wise format for reading comprehensibility, with each chapter discussing the progression analysis of a specific aspect of the market at length. Custom Software Services Consumption ( Market) in US Agriculture 1 Industry Overview 1.1 Agriculture Software Services Market Overview 1.1.1 Agriculture Software Services Product Scope 1.1.2 Market Status and Outlook 1.2 USA Agriculture Software Services Market by Product 1.3.1USA Agriculture Software Services Revenue (Million USD) and Growth (%) Comparison by Product (2012-2022) 1.3.2 USA Agriculture Software Services Revenue (Million USD) Market Share (%) by Product in 2016 1.2.1 Production Software 1.2.2 Financial Analysis Software 1.2.3 Accounting Software 1.2.4 Advanced Management Tools 1.2.5 Others 1.3USA Agriculture Software Services Market by End Users/Application 1.3.1 Animal Husbandry Software 1.3.2 Aquaculture Software 1.3.3 Hatchery Software 1.3.4 Nursery Software 1.3.5 Crop Production Software 1.3.6 Livestock Production Software 1.3.7 Others 1.4 Agriculture Software Services Development History and Outlook 1.4.1 Agriculture Software Services Development History and Status 1.4.2 Agriculture Software Services Development Outlook 1.5 Value and deal sizes 2 USA Agriculture Software Services Competition Analysis by Players 2.1 USA Agriculture Software Services Market Size (Value) by Players (2012-2017) 2.2 Competitive Status and Trend 2.2.1 Market Concentration Rate 2.2.2 Product/Service Differences 2.2.3 New Entrants 2.2.4 The Technology Trends in Future 3 Company (Top Players) Profiles and Key Data 3.1 I2S SA 3.1.1 Company Profile 3.1.2 Main Business/Business Overview 3.1.3 Products, Services and Solutions 3.1.4 I2S SA Agriculture Software Services Revenue (Value) (2012-2017) 3.1.5 Recent Developments 3.2 AKVA group 3.2.1 Company Profile 3.2.2 Main Business/Business Overview 3.2.3 Products, Services and Solutions 3.2.4 AKVA group Agriculture Software Services Revenue (Value) (2012-2017) 3.2.5 Recent Developments 3.3 ERP FM 3.3.1 Company Profile 3.3.2 Main Business/Business Overview 3.3.3 Products, Services and Solutions 3.3.4 ERP FM Agriculture Software Services Revenue (Value) (2012-2017) 3.3.5 Recent Developments 3.4 Agrimaster 3.4.1 Company Profile 3.4.2 Main Business/Business Overview 3.4.3 Products, Services and Solutions 3.4.4 Agrimaster Agriculture Software Services Revenue (Value) (2012-2017) 3.4.5 Recent Developments 3.5 FBS Systems 3.5.1 Company Profile 3.5.2 Main Business/Business Overview 3.5.3 Products, Services and Solutions 3.5.4 FBS Systems Agriculture Software Services Revenue (Value) (2012-2017) 3.5.5 Recent Developments 3.6 SST Development Group 3.6.1 Company Profile 3.6.2 Main Business/Business Overview 3.6.3 Products, Services and Solutions 3.6.4 SST Development Group Agriculture Software Services Revenue (Value) (2012-2017) 3.6.5 Recent Developments 3.7 SMAG 3.7.1 Company Profile 3.7.2 Main Business/Business Overview 3.7.3 Products, Services and Solutions 3.7.4 SMAG Agriculture Software Services Revenue (Value) (2012-2017) 3.7.5 Recent Developments 3.8 Ayoka 3.8.1 Company Profile 3.8.2 Main Business/Business Overview 3.8.3 Products, Services and Solutions 3.8.4 Ayoka Agriculture Software Services Revenue (Value) (2012-2017) 3.8.5 Recent Developments 3.9 Granular, Inc 3.9.1 Company Profile 3.9.2 Main Business/Business Overview 3.9.3 Products, Services and Solutions 3.9.4 Granular, Inc Agriculture Software Services Revenue (Value) (2012-2017) 3.9.5 Recent Developments 3.10 Agrivi 3.10.1 Company Profile 3.10.2 Main Business/Business Overview 3.10.3 Products, Services and Solutions 3.10.4 Agrivi Agriculture Software Services Revenue (Value) (2012-2017) 3.10.5 Recent Developments 3.11 Ayoka,LLC 3.12 Sum-It 3.13 AG Leader Technology 3.14 Agjunction 3.15 EFC Systems 3.16 Deere & Company For more information, please visit https://www.wiseguyreports.com/sample-request/1203917-custom-software-services-consumption-market-in-us-agriculture


News Article | December 14, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Using crop models as a tool to assist nitrogen management decisions in corn as a win-win for the agronomy business and the environment With an innovative modeling approach, researchers set out to examine corn and soybean yields and optimal nitrogen (N) fertilizer rates. In their study, recently published in Frontiers in Plant Science, they uses a 16-year long-term dataset from central Iowa, USA, with a state-of-the-art simulator that modeled corn and soybean yields, improving predictions of optimal N fertilizer rates for corn. This has global relevance for food security and sustainable agricultural practices in light of future climate change scenarios. Corn, also known as maize, is one of the top three staple crops farmed globally with global production predicted to rise from 720.8 million tons in 2015 to 872.9 by 2030, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization . Corn also requires large nutrient supplements in the form of fertilizer due to its fast-growing, nitrogen hungry characteristics. And global demand is growing. "A huge challenge in agriculture is predicting the optimal N fertilizer rates which, if fine-tuned, can reduce N losses and increase profits", explains Laila Puntel, a graduate student and research assistant in Crop Production and Physiology at Iowa State University, USA, and lead author of the study. The ultimate goal is accurately predicting the economic optimum nitrogen rate (EONR), the amount of nitrogen fertilizer that will provide the maximum economic return to nitrogen added. This is notoriously complex to calculate due to factors including the soil-plant-atmosphere system, uncertainty in weather and fluctuations in crop and fertilizer prices. To solve this conundrum, many technologies and approaches have been developed to assess the state of agricultural land. These include real-time remote sensing, aerial imaging, soil mapping and nitrate testing, crop canopy sensing and measuring chlorophyll levels. Web applications have also been developed including digital soil and weather databases. However, no single technology can make predictions of yield or optimal N fertilizer rates with the required accuracy or precision. Puntel and her international co-authors tackled this problem head on, designing an inter-disciplinary approach using field and experimental data. These data were used to test the Agricultural Production Systems sIMulator (APSIM), an internationally recognized highly advanced simulator of agricultural systems. "We found that long-term experimental data incorporating agricultural, economic and environmental factors are valuable in testing and refining the APSIM model predictions, leading to more accurate predictions of EONR" says co-author Dr. Sotirios Archontoulis, Assistant Professor in the Department of Agronomy at Iowa State University, USA. Archontoulis continues "The study results show that predictions of N fertilizer rates for corn are more accurate when inter-annual variability is taken into account. Site-specific datasets on variables such as landscape factors, weather and prices for fertilizers and crops are also key to achieving the best results." The study identifies five potential applications where the model could assist N management, ranging from simulation of N dynamics to climate change impact on optimal N requirement. It also found that optimum N rate was high for corn production alone, but could be reduced by rotating the corn with soybean. The study is timely as environmental concerns are very real and increasing. Excess nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus enter the water cycle via surface run-off, leaching or denitrification. This contaminates water systems and can also promote algal growth in water systems which can be toxic, damaging fisheries. "The study shows that using a combination of methods including process-based modeling, existing N rates and field data really can fine-tune N rate guidance for corn. Ultimately, reducing the use of nitrogen fertilizer is a win-win for the agricultural business and the environment." concludes Puntel. This work was part of the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Hatch project No. 1004346 and was also partially supported by the Plant Science Institute, and the Brown Graduate Fellowship program of Iowa State University. Citation: Puntel LA, Sawyer JE, Barker DW, Dietzel R, Poffenbarger H, Castellano MJ, Moore KJ, Thorburn P and Archontoulis SV (2016) Modeling Long-Term Corn Yield Response to Nitrogen Rate and Crop Rotation. Front. Plant Sci. 7:1630. doi: 10.3389/fpls.2016.01630


Maheswarappa H.P.,AICRP on Palms | Maheswarappa H.P.,Central Plantation Crops Research Institute | Thomas G.V.,CPCRI | Thomas G.V.,Central Plantation Crops Research Institute | And 6 more authors.
Indian Journal of Agronomy | Year: 2014

A long-term field investigation was carried out during 2001 to 2010 at Vittal (Karnataka) in a 22 year old coconut garden under laterite soil to study the impact of inorganic fertilizer substitutions by vermicompost (VC) on productivity and profitability of coconut (Cocos nucifera L.). The treatments, viz. recommended inorganic fertilizer (500 g N, 320 g P and 1200 g K/palm/year), 25% of N in the form of VC (9.6 kg/palm) + 75% of NPK, 50% N in the form of VC (19.2 kg/palm) + 50% of NPK, 75% in the form of VC (28.8 kg/palm) + 25% NPK and 100% N in the form of VC alone (38.5 kg/palm) were imposed in randomized block design. Annual leaf production did not differ significantly among the treatments; however, integrated treatments resulted in higher number of leaves (12 no.). Six years pooled data on nut yield indicated that, application of vermicompost in combination with inorganic fertilizer either at 25% of N + 75% NPK (64.5 nuts/palm/year) or 50% of N + 50% NPK (66.2 nuts/palm/year) resulted in significantly higher nut yield. There was improvement in the nutrient status of coconut leaves with integrated nutrient management practices compared to inorganic or organic manure alone application. The soil organic carbon build up was observed with application of 50% N or more in the form of vermicompost compared to the other treatments. Microbial population in respect of fungi and phosphate solubilizes were higher when vermicompost was applied. © 2014, Indian Society of Agronomy. All rights reserved.


Chiuraise N.,University of KwaZulu - Natal | Derera J.,University of KwaZulu - Natal | Yobo K.S.,University of KwaZulu - Natal | Magorokosho C.,CIMMYT | And 2 more authors.
Euphytica | Year: 2016

Contamination of maize grain with mycotoxins including aflatoxin and fumonisin poses a threat to human health and livestock. The objectives of this study were to determine the current status of incidence of ear rot causing fungi, which are associated with mycotoxin contamination, in southern African maize hybrids, and to check whether or not mycotoxin resistance genes can be stacked in a single product. The 327 hybrids were evaluated under natural conditions in replicated trials over two seasons at Cedara Research Station, which is hot spot site for ear rot diseases. Concurrently, aflatoxin and fumonisin resistant tropical maize inbred lines were crossed with South African adapted inbred lines. The resultant 72 single crosses were evaluated for fumonisin contamination, while 44 three-way crosses and their progenies (146 S2:3 families) were evaluated for both aflatoxin and fumonisin contamination under artificial inoculation. The Fusarium verticillioides was the most prevalent ear rot causing fungus, followed by Stenocarpella maydis, F. graminearum and Aspergillus flavus. The late maturing hybrids were more susceptible to ear rots contamination than their earlier counterparts. Stacking of mycotoxin contamination resistance genes was successful because five experimental single cross hybrids consistently accumulated low fumonisin levels (<4 ppm), both in the greenhouse and field trials. Three 3-way crosses displayed low contamination levels for both aflatoxins (<5 ppb) and fumonisins. Four S2:3 families accumulated low levels of both aflatoxins and fumonisins below the legal limits of 5 ppb and 4 ppm, respectively. Therefore significant progress can be realised in breeding mycotoxin resistant maize hybrids. © 2015, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.


WINNIPEG, MANITOBA--(Marketwired - Dec. 12, 2016) - Winston Gold Mining Corp. ("Winston Gold" or the "Corporation") (CSE:WGC) (CSE:WGC.CN) (OTCQB:WGMCF) is pleased to announce the results of its Annual General and Special Meeting of Shareholders (the "Meeting") held on December 12, 2016, in Vancouver. At the Meeting, the shareholders of the Corporation unanimously approved all resolutions put before them by management, including the election of directors, re-appointment of the auditor, continuation of the Corporation into British Columbia from Manitoba and the accompanying provisions, and the Corporation's 10% rolling stock option plan. At the Meeting, the Corporation's shareholders re-elected Murray Nye, Max Polinsky, Darwin Ben Porterfield, and Allan Fabbro as directors of the Corporation. In addition, the shareholders elected Stanley Stewin as a director. Mr. Stewin is a Member of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Manitoba (2007 to present) and obtained a Bachelor of Commerce (Honours) - University of Manitoba. Mr. Stewin has over 20 years' experience in the agricultural industry. Mr. Stewin is currently Head of Audits at the Canadian Grain Commission located in Winnipeg, Manitoba (from 2007 to present) and is managing a staff of five professionals. Mr. Stewin was previously Head of Country Operation Eastern Region at Agricore United, Winnipeg Manitoba (from 1985 to 2007), an agricultural business with a grain handle in excess of 11 million Metric tons and with Crop Production Sales in excess of $900 million. Mr. Stewin has extensive experience in restructuring and re-organizing departments/organizations involving business analysis, developing business plans, leading negotiations and community consultations. The Corporation is also pleased to announce the appointment of Ronan Sabo-Walsh as its Chief Financial Officer. Mr. Sabo-Walsh's appointment is effective immediately. He replaces Mr. Max Polinsky, who has acted as the Corporation's Chief Financial Officer since September 29, 2014. Mr. Polinsky will retain his status as the President and a director of the Corporation. Mr. Sabo-Walsh holds a Bachelor of Commerce degree in Finance from the University of British Columbia and has over 5 years' experience in corporate finance. He has been employed by V Baron Global Financial Canada Ltd., a full-service merchant bank providing ongoing financial and back-office support to public companies, since 2011 and currently holds the title of Assistant Manager, Corporate Finance. Mr. Sabo-Walsh is also the VP, Finance of Novo Resources Corp., a mineral exploration company listed on the TSX Venture Exchange. Mr. Sabo-Walsh has extensive experience with public listings, merger transactions, and public company management. Winston Gold is a junior mining company focused on advancing high-grade, low cost mining opportunities into production. Towards that end, the Corporation has acquired two under-explored and under-exploited gold/silver mining opportunities, being the Winston Gold project near Helena, Montana, and the Gold Ridge project, near Willcox, Arizona. On behalf of the Board of Directors of the Company The CSE has neither approved nor disapproved the information contained herein.


News Article | December 14, 2016
Site: www.rdmag.com

With an innovative modeling approach, researchers set out to examine corn and soybean yields and optimal nitrogen (N) fertilizer rates. In their study, recently published in Frontiers in Plant Science, they uses a 16-year long-term dataset from central Iowa, USA, with a state-of-the-art simulator that modeled corn and soybean yields, improving predictions of optimal N fertilizer rates for corn. This has global relevance for food security and sustainable agricultural practices in light of future climate change scenarios. Corn, also known as maize, is one of the top three staple crops farmed globally with global production predicted to rise from 720.8 million tons in 2015 to 872.9 by 2030, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization. Corn also requires large nutrient supplements in the form of fertilizer due to its fast-growing, nitrogen hungry characteristics. And global demand is growing. "A huge challenge in agriculture is predicting the optimal N fertilizer rates which, if fine-tuned, can reduce N losses and increase profits", explains Laila Puntel, a graduate student and research assistant in Crop Production and Physiology at Iowa State University, USA, and lead author of the study. The ultimate goal is accurately predicting the economic optimum nitrogen rate (EONR), the amount of nitrogen fertilizer that will provide the maximum economic return to nitrogen added. This is notoriously complex to calculate due to factors including the soil-plant-atmosphere system, uncertainty in weather and fluctuations in crop and fertilizer prices. To solve this conundrum, many technologies and approaches have been developed to assess the state of agricultural land. These include real-time remote sensing, aerial imaging, soil mapping and nitrate testing, crop canopy sensing and measuring chlorophyll levels. Web applications have also been developed including digital soil and weather databases. However, no single technology can make predictions of yield or optimal N fertilizer rates with the required accuracy or precision. Puntel and her international co-authors tackled this problem head on, designing an inter-disciplinary approach using field and experimental data. These data were used to test the Agricultural Production Systems sIMulator (APSIM), an internationally recognized highly advanced simulator of agricultural systems. "We found that long-term experimental data incorporating agricultural, economic and environmental factors are valuable in testing and refining the APSIM model predictions, leading to more accurate predictions of EONR" says co-author Dr. Sotirios Archontoulis, Assistant Professor in the Department of Agronomy at Iowa State University, USA. Archontoulis continues "The study results show that predictions of N fertilizer rates for corn are more accurate when inter-annual variability is taken into account. Site-specific datasets on variables such as landscape factors, weather and prices for fertilizers and crops are also key to achieving the best results." The study identifies five potential applications where the model could assist N management, ranging from simulation of N dynamics to climate change impact on optimal N requirement. It also found that optimum N rate was high for corn production alone, but could be reduced by rotating the corn with soybean. The study is timely as environmental concerns are very real and increasing. Excess nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus enter the water cycle via surface run-off, leaching or denitrification. This contaminates water systems and can also promote algal growth in water systems which can be toxic, damaging fisheries. "The study shows that using a combination of methods including process-based modeling, existing N rates and field data really can fine-tune N rate guidance for corn. Ultimately, reducing the use of nitrogen fertilizer is a win-win for the agricultural business and the environment." concludes Puntel.


News Article | December 14, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Jan Johnson, owner of Millennium Research, Inc., unveiled new details from the company’s in-depth look at America’s new generation of agricultural production professionals, to aid attending retailers in succeeding with this new generation of decision makers on the farm. During her presentation, Johnson shared her recommendations for helping retailers succeed in their efforts to help young farmers succeed, as well as her views on how and why these farmers use technology. In addition to many other insights, it was revealed that 94 percent of young farmers access the internet using only their smart phones, and that 91 percent of young farmers use GPS steering in their tractors and combines. “Today’s young farmers are extremely well-educated,” Johnson noted. “These young producers are much more technology- and business-minded than their older farming partners. Young farmers employ technology strategically, to improve efficiency and productivity on the farm – and they want to know the ROI on every investment they make.” Zack Johnson and Adam Hislop, two millennial-generation farmers from Minnesota appeared in a panel directly following the presentation and shared their thoughts about Johnson’s discoveries related to the future of agriculture. “Jan hit the nail on the head,” said Hislop. “I doesn't make any sense to spend ten bushels to get an additional three." Audience response to the data presented by Johnson was enthusiastic. “It was like looking through the window at my father and brothers,” said Dave Ruen, a representative for a large crop production supplier. “I felt like Jimmy Stewart in It’s A Wonderful Life while listening to her presentation; Jan’s perceptions of young producers are incredibly accurate.” Millennium Research, Inc. is a leading independent full service market research organization specializing in agriculture and agricultural producers. Johnson’s Young Farmer Study presentation at the Minnesota Crop Production Retailers annual MCPR Trade Show was a comprehensive look at a continuing study Millennium Research started one year ago. The presentation included previously-unreleased findings from the company’s other publicly available work for the National Association of Farm Broadcasting and the Farmer Speaks panel. The study combines primary and secondary research with social media mining and ethnography, as well as Millennium’s proprietary Empathic Method™ of gaining superior market insight.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

Editors Note: There are two photos associated with this press release. Senior levels of government continue to overlook the many benefits of investing in living green infrastructure such as urban forests, green roofs, green walls, and bioswales when making multi-billion dollar infrastructure decisions. Join us and shape a healthier and more resilient future at the Grey to Green Conference: Quantifying Green Infrastructure from May 8-10, 2017 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Now in its 5th year, Grey to Green will feature a Public Forum on May 8th to discuss barriers and opportunities to advance green infrastructure from a variety of professional perspectives. The Forum includes Jennifer Keesmaat, Chief Planner, City of Toronto; Deborah Martin-Downs, CAO, Credit Valley Conservation; Steven Peck, Founder and President, Green Roofs for Healthy Cities; and Scott Torrance, Practice Leader, Scott Torrance Landscape Architect. "Quantifying the biophysical, social and economic benefits of green infrastructure is essential to support better design practice and policies for investing in, and protecting, green infrastructure assets," said Steven W. Peck, GRP, and Founder of Green Roofs for Healthy Cities. "A lot of progress made on this front in the past year, which we plan to highlight at Grey to Green," he added. Grey to Green will attract more than 300 architects, landscape architects, policy makers, manufacturers, growers, landscapers, and other green infrastructure professionals to discuss the benefits, growth and tangible effects of the green infrastructure industry. More than 50 expert speakers on a wide variety of topics will present on May 9th their latest work on Natural Capital, Green Infrastructure Asset Management, Stormwater Policy Best Practices, Health Impacts of Green Infrastructure, and Green Infrastructure Design Valuation. Expert speakers include: Grey to Green also includes a trade show and exceptional networking. Most professional training opportunities are paired with tours and include Low Impact Development, Rooftop Agriculture, New Lighting Technologies for Indoor Vegetable and Medical Crop Production and Living Walls, Green Walls 101: Systems Overview & Design, and Integrated Water Management for Buildings and Sites. Presented by Green Roofs for Healthy Cities, the Green Infrastructure Foundation, in partnership with the City of Toronto. Proud sponsors include: Toronto and Region Conservation Authority; Live Green Toronto; DeepRoot; Green Infrastructure Ontario Coalition; Credit Valley Conservation; LiveRoof; Ginkgo Sustainability; Gro-Bark; TD Bank Group; Construction Links Media; Renew Magazine; Water Canada; Ontario Association of Landscape Architects; Ontario Parks Association; Ryerson University; Landscape Ontario; greenroofs.com; Carrot Common; and Ryerson University Urban Water. Early bird rates end March 10, 2017. Student pricing is available. To register visit, greytogreenconference.org. For media passes please contact Kara Orr at korr@greenroofs.org. Green Roofs for Healthy Cities' mission is to develop and protect the market by increasing the awareness of the economic, social and environmental benefits of green roofs, green walls, and other forms of living architecture. The Green Infrastructure Foundation is a charitable organization with a mission is to promote green infrastructure across North America through education. To view the photos associated with this press release, please visit the following links:

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