Criminal Scientific Investigation Laboratory

Nerima-ku, Japan

Criminal Scientific Investigation Laboratory

Nerima-ku, Japan
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Inokuchi S.,Juntendo University | Inokuchi S.,Criminal Scientific Investigation Laboratory | Yamashita Y.,Criminal Scientific Investigation Laboratory | Nishimura K.,Criminal Scientific Investigation Laboratory | And 2 more authors.
International Journal of Legal Medicine | Year: 2017

Phenomena known as null alleles and peak imbalance can occur because of mutations in the primer binding sites used for DNA typing. In these cases, an accurate statistical evaluation of DNA typing is difficult. The estimated likelihood ratio is incorrectly calculated because of the null allele and allele dropout caused by mutation-induced peak imbalance. Although a number of studies have attempted to uncover examples of these phenomena, few reports are available on the human identification kit manufactured by Qiagen. In this study, 196 Japanese individuals who were heterozygous at D2S1360 were genotyped using an Investigator HDplex Kit with optimal amounts of DNA. A peak imbalance was frequently observed at the D2S1360 locus. We performed a sequencing analysis of the area surrounding the D2S1360 repeat motif to identify the cause for peak imbalance. A point mutation (G>A transition) 136 nucleotides upstream from the D2S1360 repeat motif was discovered in a number of samples. The allele frequency of the mutation was 0.0566 in the Japanese population. Therefore, human identification or kinship testing using the Investigator HDplex Kit requires caution because of the higher frequency of single nucleotide polymorphisms at the primer binding site of D2S1360 locus in the Japanese population. © 2017 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg


Inokuchi S.,Juntendo University | Inokuchi S.,Japan National Research Institute of Fisheries Science | Inokuchi S.,Criminal Scientific Investigation Laboratory | Kitayama T.,Japan National Research Institute of Fisheries Science | And 6 more authors.
Legal Medicine | Year: 2016

Phenomena called allele dropouts are often observed in crime stain profiles. Allele dropouts are generated because one of a pair of heterozygous alleles is underrepresented by stochastic influences and is indicated by a low peak detection threshold. Therefore, it is important that such risks are statistically evaluated. In recent years, attempts to interpret allele dropout probabilities by logistic regression using the information on peak heights have been reported. However, these previous studies are limited to the use of a human identification kit and fragment analyzer. In the present study, we calculated allele dropout probabilities by logistic regression using contemporary capillary electrophoresis instruments, 3500xL Genetic Analyzer and 3130xl Genetic Analyzer with various commercially available human identification kits such as AmpFℓSTR® Identifiler® Plus PCR Amplification Kit. Furthermore, the differences in logistic curves between peak detection thresholds using analytical threshold (AT) and values recommended by the manufacturer were compared. The standard logistic curves for calculating allele dropout probabilities from the peak height of sister alleles were characterized. The present study confirmed that ATs were lower than the values recommended by the manufacturer in human identification kits; therefore, it is possible to reduce allele dropout probabilities and obtain more information using AT as the peak detection threshold. © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

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