Bedford, United Kingdom
Bedford, United Kingdom

Cranfield University is a British postgraduate and research-based university with two campuses. The main campus is at Cranfield, Bedfordshire and the second is the Defence Academy of the United Kingdom at Shrivenham, Oxfordshire. The main campus is unique in the United Kingdom for having an operational airport next to the main campus. The airport facilities are used by Cranfield University's own aircraft in the course of aerospace teaching and research. Wikipedia.

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Patent
Cranfield University | Date: 2017-02-22

This invention generally relates to a method of controlling emission wavelength of a light emitting device, and a system for wavelength control of a light emitting device, for example for wavelength stabilisation of a laser diode. One method of controlling emission wavelength of a light emitting device comprises: determining an indication of series resistance of the device, the series resistance comprising ohmic resistance of the device; providing a current through the device to maintain light emission of the device; measuring a forward voltage of the device during said light emission, the forward voltage being across an impedance comprising impedance of an active region of the device and the series resistance; determining an indicator of active region voltage on the basis of the measured forward voltage and the determined indicator of series resistance; and controlling a temperature of the device on the basis of the determined indicator of active region voltage.


Patent
Cranfield University | Date: 2015-04-09

This invention generally relates to a method of controlling emission wavelength of a light emitting device, and a system for wavelength control of a light emitting device, for example for wavelength stabilisation of a laser diode. One method of controlling emission wavelength of a light emitting device comprises: determining an indication of series resistance of the device, the series resistance comprising ohmic resistance of the device; providing a current through the device to maintain light emission of the device; measuring a forward voltage of the device during said light emission, the forward voltage being across an impedance comprising impedance of an active region of the device and the series resistance; determining an indicator of active region voltage on the basis of the measured forward voltage and the determined indicator of series resistance; and controlling a temperature of the device on the basis of the determined indicator of active region voltage.


The CryoHub innovation project will investigate and extend the potential of large-scale Cryogenic Energy Storage (CES) and will apply the stored energy for both cooling and energy generation. By employing Renewable Energy Sources (RES) to liquefy and store cryogens, CryoHub will balance the power grid, while meeting the cooling demand of a refrigerated food warehouse and recovering the waste heat from its equipment and components. The intermittent supply is a major obstacle to the RES power market. In reality, RES are fickle forces, prone to over-producing when demand is low and failing to meet requirements when demand peaks. Europe is about to generate 20% of its required energy from RES by 2020, so that the proper RES integration poses continent-wide challenges. The Cryogenic Energy Storage (CES), and particularly the Liquid Air Energy Storage (LAES), is a promising technology enabling on-site storage of RES energy during periods of high generation and its use at peak grid demand. Thus, CES acts as Grid Energy Storage (GES), where cryogen is boiled to drive a turbine and to restore electricity to the grid. To date, CES applications have been rather limited by the poor round trip efficiency (ratio between energies spent for and retrieved from energy storage) due to unrecovered energy losses. The CryoHub project is therefore designed to maximise the CES efficiency by recovering energy from cooling and heating in a perfect RES-driven cycle of cryogen liquefaction, storage, distribution and efficient use. Refrigerated warehouses for chilled and frozen food commodities are large electricity consumers, possess powerful installed capacities for cooling and heating and waste substantial amounts of heat. Such facilities provide the ideal industrial environment to advance and demonstrate the LAES benefits. CryoHub will thus resolve most of the above-mentioned problems at one go, thereby paving the way for broader market prospects for CES-based technologies across Europe.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: LCE-33-2016 | Award Amount: 2.86M | Year: 2017

Despite process heat is recognized as the application with highest potential among solar heating and cooling applications, Solar Heat for Industrial Processes (SHIP) still presents a modest share of about 0.3% of total installed solar thermal capacity. As of todays technology development stage economic competitiveness restricted to low temperature applications; technology implementation requiring interference with existing heat production systems, heat distribution networks or even heat consuming processes - Solar thermal potential is mainly identified for new industrial capacity in outside Americas and Europe. In this context, INSHIP aims at the definition of a ECRIA engaging major European research institutes with recognized activities on SHIP, into an integrated structure that could successfully achieve the coordination objectives of: more effective and intense cooperation between EU research institutions; alignment of different SHIP related national research and funding programs, avoiding overlaps and duplications and identifying gaps; acceleration of knowledge transfer to the European industry, to be the reference organization to promote and coordinate the international cooperation in SHIP research from and to Europe, while developing coordinated R&D TRLs 2-5 activities with the ambition of progressing SHIP beyond the state-of-the-art through: an easier integration of low and medium temperature technologies suiting the operation, durability and reliability requirements of industrial end users; expanding the range of SHIP applications to the EI sector through the development of suitable process embedded solar concentrating technologies, overcoming the present barrier of applications only in the low and medium temperature ranges; increasing the synergies within industrial parks, through centralized heat distribution networks and exploiting the potential synergies of these networks with district heating and with the electricity grid.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: WATER-1b-2015 | Award Amount: 10.74M | Year: 2016

The AquaNES project will catalyse innovations in water and wastewater treatment processes and management through improved combinations of natural and engineered components. Among the demonstrated solutions are natural treatment processes such as bank filtration (BF), managed aquifer recharge (MAR) and constructed wetlands (CW) plus engineered pre- and post-treatment options. The project focuses on 13 demonstration sites in Europe, India and Israel covering a repre-sentative range of regional, climatic, and hydrogeological conditions in which different combined natural-engineered treatment systems (cNES) will be demonstrated through active collaboration of knowledge and technology providers, water utilities and end-users. Our specific objectives are to demonstrate the benefits of post-treatment options such as membranes, activated carbon and ozonation after bank filtration for the production of safe drinking water to validate the treatment and storage capacity of soil-aquifer systems in combination with oxidative pre-treatments to demonstrate the combination of constructed wetlands with different technical post- or pre-treatment options (ozone or bioreactor systems) as a wastewater treatment option to evidence reductions in operating costs and energy consumption to test a robust risk assessment framework for cNES to deliver design guidance for cNES informed by industrial or near-industrial scale expe-riences to identify and profile new market opportunities in Europe and overseas for cNES The AquaNES project will demonstrate combined natural-engineered treatment systems as sus-tainable adaptations to issues such as water scarcity, excess water in cities and micro-pollutants in the water cycle. It will thus have impact across the EIP Waters thematic priorities and cross-cutting issues, particularly on Water reuse & recycling, Water and wastewater treatment, Water-energy nexus, Ecosystem services, Water governance, and DSS & monitoring.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: WATER-1b-2015 | Award Amount: 9.77M | Year: 2016

SMART-Plant will scale-up in real environment eco-innovative and energy-efficient solutions to renovate existing wastewater treatment plants and close the circular value chain by applying low-carbon techniques to recover materials that are otherwise lost. 7\2 pilot systems will be optimized fore > 2 years in real environment in 5 municipal water treatment plants, inclunding also 2 post-processing facilities. The systems will be authomatisedwith the aim of optimizing wastewater treatment, resource recovery, energy-efficiency and reduction of greenhouse emissions. A comprehensive SMART portfolio comprising biopolymers, cellulose, fertilizersand intermediates will be recoveredand processed up to the final commercializable end-products. The integration of resource recovery assets to system-wide asset management programs will be evaluated in each site following the resource recovery paradigm for the wastewater treatment plant of the future, enabled through SMART-Plant solutions. The project will prove the feasibility of circular management of urban wastewater and environmental sustainability of the systems, to be demonstrated through Life Cycle Assessment and Life Cycle Costing approaches to prove the global benefit of the scaled-up water solutions. Dynamic modeling and superstructure framework for decision support will be developed and validated to identify the optimum SMART-Plant system integration options for recovered resources and technologies.Global market deployment will be achieved as right fit solution for water utilities and relevant industrial stakeholders, considering the strategic implications of the resource recovery paradigm in case of both public and private water management. New public-private partnership models will be explored connecting the water sector to the chemical industry and its downstream segments such asthe contruction and agricultural sector, thus generating new opportunities for funding, as well as potential public-private competition.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: FOF-01-2016 | Award Amount: 4.87M | Year: 2016

The LASIMM project aim is to develop a large scale flexible hybrid additive/subtractive machine based on a modular architecture which is easily scalable. The machine will feature capabilities for additive manufacture, machining, cold-work, metrology and inspection that will provide the optimum solution for the hybrid manufacturing of large engineering parts of high integrity, with cost benefits of more than 50% compared to conventional machining processes. For large scale engineering structures material needs to be deposited at a relatively high rate with exceptional properties and excellent integrity. To ensure this the machine is based on wire \ arc additive manufacture for the additive process. A unique feature of the machine will be the capability for parallel manufacturing featuring either multiple deposition heads or concurrent addition and subtraction processes. To facilitate parallel manufacturing the machine architecture is based on robotics. To ensure that the surface finish and accuracy needed for engineering components is obtained for the subtractive step a parallel kinematic motion robot is employed. This robot is also used for application of cold work by rolling between passes. This ensures that material properties can be better than those of forged material. A key part of this project is the development of ICT infrastructure and toolboxes needed to programme and run the machine. The implementation of parallel manufacturing is extremely challenging from a software perspective and this will be a major activity within the project. To deliver this extremely demanding and ambitious project a well-balanced expert team has been brought together. There are ten partners comprising six companies, two Universities and two research institutes. Two of the companies are SMEs and there are three end users from the renewable energy, construction and aerospace sectors. The consortium also features the whole of the supply chain needed to produce such a machine.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SFS-13-2015 | Award Amount: 5.24M | Year: 2016

MyToolBox mobilises a multi-actor partnership (academia, farmers, technology SMEs, food industry and policy stakeholders) to develop novel interventions aimed at achieving a 20-90% reduction in crop losses due to fungal and mycotoxin contamination. MyToolBox will not only pursue a field-to-fork approach but will also consider safe use options of contaminated batches, such as the efficient production of biofuels. A major component of MyToolBox, which also distinguishes this proposal from previous efforts in the area mycotoxin reduction, is to provide the recommended measures to the end users along the food and feed chain in a web-based Toolbox. Cutting edge research will result in new interventions, which will be integrated together with existing measures in the Toolbox that will guide the end user as to the most effective measure(s) to be taken to reduce crop losses. We will focus on small grain cereals, maize, peanuts and dried figs, applicable to agricultural conditions in EU and China. Crop losses using existing practices will be compared with crop losses after novel pre-harvest interventions including investigation of genetic resistance to fungal infection, cultural control, the use of novel biopesticides (organic-farming compliant), competitive biocontrol treatment and development of forecasting models to predict mycotoxin contamination. Research into post-harvest measures including real-time monitoring during storage, innovative sorting of crops using vision-technology and novel milling technology will enable cereals with higher mycotoxin levels to be processed without breaching regulatory limits in finished products. Research into the effects of baking on mycotoxin levels will provide better understanding of process factors used in mycotoxin risk assessment. Involvement of leading institutions from China are aimed at establishing a sustainable cooperation in mycotoxin research between the EU and China.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: LCE-02-2015 | Award Amount: 5.94M | Year: 2016

Concentrating Solar Power is one of the most promising and sustainable renewable energy and is positioned to play a massive role in the future global generation mix, alongside wind, hydro and solar photovoltaic technologies. Although there is definitely perspective for the technology for rapid grow, success of CSP will ultimately rely on the ability to overcome obstacles that prevent its mass adoption, especially the large financial demand and limited accessibility of water. Water saving is therefore one of the major issues to ensure a financially competitive position of CSP plants and their sustainable implementation. To overcome such challenges, WASCOP brings together leading EU and Moroccan Institutions, Universities, and commercial SMEs and industry. They join their forces to develop a revolutionary innovation in water management of CSP plants - flexible integrated solution comprising different innovative technologies and optimized strategies for the cooling of the power-block and the cleaning of the solar field optical surfaces. WASCOP main advantage consists in the ability to reflect and adapt to the specific conditions prevailing at individual CSP plants, unlike other competitive approaches proposing a single generic solution applicable only on some referenced cases. The WASCOP holistic solution provides an effective combination of technologies allowing a significant reduction in water consumption (up to 70% - 90%) and a significant improvement in the water management of CSP plants. To demonstrate the benefits (whether economic or environmental), the developed system will be tested and validated in real conditions of four testing sites in France, Spain and Morocco after preliminary demonstration in laboratory environment.

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