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Coventry, United Kingdom

Coventry University is a public research university in the city of Coventry, England. It was established as a university through the Further and Higher Education Act 1992, and was formerly known as Lanchester Polytechnic until 1987 and Coventry Polytechnic until it was awarded university status.With more than 27,000 students , Coventry University is the larger of the two universities in the city, the other being the University of Warwick. It has two campuses: one in the city centre of Coventry where a large majority of the university operates, and one in London. The campus in Coventry is currently undergoing a £160m redevelopment programme. The university comprises four faculties and one school, and manages a number of commercial subsidiaries that provide business services to local and national organisations.The university is a member of the Association of Commonwealth Universities, University Alliance and Universities UK. Wikipedia.


Bruce J.,Coventry University
Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) | Year: 2013

Fractures of the calcaneus (heel bone) comprise up to 2% of all fractures. These fractures are mostly caused by a fall from a height, and are common in younger adults. Treatment can be surgical or non-surgical; however, there is clinical uncertainty over optimal management. To assess the effects of surgical compared with conservative treatment of displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures in adults. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register (to July 2011), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library, 2011 Issue 3), MEDLINE (1948 to July 2011), EMBASE (1980 to 2011 Week 27), the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, Current Controlled Trials, and Orthopaedic Trauma Association annual meeting archives (1996 to 2011). Reference lists of retrieved articles were checked. No language restrictions were applied. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled clinical studies comparing surgical versus conservative management for displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures. Two review authors independently screened search results, selected studies, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. Primary outcomes were function (e.g. walking ability) and chronic pain. Risk ratios were calculated for dichotomous outcomes and mean differences for continuous outcomes. Missing standard deviations were calculated from P values. Four trials were included (602 participants). Three trials were small single-centre trials, and the fourth a large multi-centre trial including 424 participants. All trials had methodological flaws, usually failure to conceal allocation and incomplete follow-up data, which put them at high risk of bias. Follow-up ranged from 1 to 15 years after treatment.Data for functional outcomes, including walking ability, from three trials could not be pooled. The strongest evidence was from the multi-centre trial. This showed no statistically or clinically significant differences between the surgical and conservatively treated groups at three years follow-up in the ''validated disease-specific" score (0 to 100: perfect result; 424 participants; mean difference (MD) 4.30, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.11 to 9.71; P = 0.12). There was no significant difference between the two groups in the risk of chronic pain at follow-up (19/40 versus 24/42; risk ratio (RR) 0.79, 95% CI 0.53 to 1.18; 2 trials). The multi-centre trial found no statistically or clinically significant difference between the two groups in health-related quality of life at three years follow-up (SF-36 (0 to 100: best outcome): MD 4.00, 95% CI -1.16 to 9.16; P = 0.13).Two small trials provided some limited evidence of a tendency for a higher return to previous employment after surgery (27/34 versus 15/27; RR 1.45, 95% CI 0.75 to 2.81; I2 = 55%; 2 trials). One small trial found no difference between the two groups in the ability to wear normal shoes, whereas another small trial found that surgery resulted in more people who were able to wear all shoes comfortably. There was a higher rate of major complications, such as surgical site infection, after surgery compared with conservative treatment (57/206 versus 42/218; RR 1.44, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.04; 1 trial). Conversely, significantly fewer surgical participants had subtalar arthrodeses due to the development of subtalar arthritis (7/206 versus 37/218; RR 0.20, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.44; 1 trial). There were no significant differences between the two groups in range of movement outcomes or radiological measurements (e.g. Bohler's angle). The bulk of the evidence in this review derives from one large multi-centre but inadequately reported trial conducted over 15 years ago. This found no significant differences between surgical or conservative treatment in functional ability and health related quality of life at three years after displaced intra-articular calcaneal fracture. Though it reported a greater risk of major complications after surgery, subtalar arthrodeses for the development of subtalar arthritis was significantly greater after conservative treatment.Overall, there is insufficient high quality evidence relating to current practice to establish whether surgical or conservative treatment is better for adults with displaced intra-articular calcaneal fracture. Evidence from adequately powered randomised, multi-centre controlled trials, assessing patient-centred and clinically relevant outcomes is required. However, it would be prudent to reassess this need after an update of the review that incorporates new evidence from a currently ongoing multi-centre trial.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-20-2015 | Award Amount: 3.33M | Year: 2016

Whole-Body Interaction Learning for Dance Education WhoLoDance is aiming at both researching and innovating contemporary learning theories of embodied cognition and dance education, building on advances on neuroscience, pedagogical and learning theories, educational psychology together with new technologies in artificial intelligence and knowledge management. Dance is a diverse and heterogeneous practice and WhoLoDance will develop a protocol for the creation and/or selection of dance sequences drawn from different dance styles and appropriate for different teaching and learning modalities that can provide the base content for the capture, cataloguing and analysis of dance movement for the creation of different interactive and immersive learning tools. WhoLoDance will support learning the essential components of dance, enhancing movement skills, and creating solutions for supporting the composition, re-use, and distribution of interactive educational content and services, with assessment and feedback functionalities making use of immersive real-time tools to learn dance choreographies. WhoLoDance will explore smart learning environments for providing dance students with adaptive and personalised learning and assessment, through multi-modal/multi-sensory interaction technologies and advanced immersive real-time training interfaces. WhoLoDance will create and deliver the proof-of-concept of a motion capture repository of dance motions built in a method allowing interpolations, extrapolations and synthesis through similarity search to enable new and powerful dance teaching paradigms. Finally WhoLoDance aim is to create a digital environment that will provide dance educators and students, as well as creators (choreographers) the opportunity for capacity building and networking, bringing together practitioners from different physical spaces, and will allow them to communicate chorographical ideas and movement concepts online and work collaboratively.


Mason T.J.,Coventry University
Ultrasonics Sonochemistry | Year: 2016

The development of ultrasonic cleaning dates from the middle of the 20th century and has become a method of choice for a range of surface cleaning operations. The reasons why this has happened and the methods of assessing the efficiency of ultrasonic cleaning baths are reviewed. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Lam E.W.-F.,Imperial College London | Brosens J.J.,Coventry University | Gomes A.R.,Imperial College London | Koo C.-Y.,Imperial College London
Nature Reviews Cancer | Year: 2013

Forkhead box (FOX) proteins are multifaceted transcription factors that are responsible for fine-tuning the spatial and temporal expression of a broad range of genes both during development and in adult tissues. This function is engrained in their ability to integrate a multitude of cellular and environmental signals and to act with remarkable fidelity. Several key members of the FOXA, FOXC, FOXM, FOXO and FOXP subfamilies are strongly implicated in cancer, driving initiation, maintenance, progression and drug resistance. The functional complexities of FOX proteins are coming to light and have established these transcription factors as possible therapeutic targets and putative biomarkers for specific cancers. © 2013 Macmillan Publishers Limited.


Price M.,Coventry University
Sports Medicine | Year: 2010

Resting energy expenditure of persons with a spinal cord injury (SCI) is generally lower than that seen in able-bodied (AB) individuals due to the reduced amounts of muscle mass and sympathetic nervous system available. However, outside of clinical studies, much less data is available regarding athletes with an SCI. In order to predict the energy expenditure of persons with SCI, the generation and validation of prediction equations in relation to specific levels of SCI and training status are required. Specific prediction equations for the SCI would enable a quick and accurate estimate of energy requirements. When compared with the equivalent AB individuals, sports energy expenditure is generally reduced in SCI with values representing 3075 of AB values. The lowest energy expenditure values are observed for sports involving athletes with tetraplegia and where the sport is a static version of that undertaken by the AB, such as fencing. As with AB sports there is a lack of SCI data for true competition situations due to methodological constraints. However, where energy expenditure during field tests are predicted from laboratory-based protocols, wheelchair ergometry is likely to be the most appropriate exercise mode. The physiological and metabolic responses of persons with SCI are similar to those for AB athletes, but at lower absolute levels. However, the underlying mechanisms pertaining to substrate utilization appear to differ between the AB and SCI. Carbohydrate feeding has been shown to improve endurance performance in athletes with generally low levels of SCI, but no data have been reported for mid to high levels of SCI or for sport-specific tests of an intermittent nature. Further research within the areas reviewed may help to bridge the gap between what is known regarding AB athletes and athletes with SCI (and other disabilities) during exercise and also the gap between clinical practice and performance. © 2010 Adis Data Information BV. All rights reserved.

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