Coventor Inc

Sunnyvale, CA, United States

Coventor Inc

Sunnyvale, CA, United States
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De Los Santos H.J.,COVENTOR Inc
Antem 2002 - International Symposium on Antenna Technology and Applied Electromagnetics, Conference Proceedings | Year: 2017

It can be said that the field of MEMS was originated by the late Richard P. Feynman back in 1959 when he made the observation 'there is plenty of room at the bottom.' [1]. Feynman reached this conclusion upon conducting a special type of search, namely, a search for a boundless field. He noticed that fields like endeavoring to attain low temperatures, or attaining high pressures, had virtually no end in sight. That is, you could never say/claim you had reached the lowest temperature or the highest pressure. His search led him to discover a new field, namely, that of miniaturization, whose goal was to engage in a program to make everything small. Wondering why had so little been done on miniaturization, Feynman determined that, while there were no innate limitations imposed by the laws of physics, these were actually rooted in technology, that is, it is our ability to make small things that sets a limit on miniaturization. Having acknowledged that miniaturization was limited by technology, and that this limitation would Erode in time, Feynman went on to consider what if the technological problem/limitation was nonexistent? How would miniaturization impact three particular areas of application, namely, Information Storage, Computers, and more pertinent to this presentation, Machines? © 2002 ANTEM.


Schropfer G.,Coventor Sarl | Lorenz G.,Coventor Sarl | Rouvillois S.,Coventor Sarl | Breit S.,Coventor Inc
Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering | Year: 2010

This paper provides a brief summary of the state-of-the-art of MEMS-specific modeling techniques and describes the validation of new models for a parametric component library. Two recently developed 3D modeling tools are described in more detail. The first one captures a methodology for designing MEMS devices and simulating them together with integrated electronics within a standard electronic design automation (EDA) environment. The MEMS designer can construct the MEMS model directly in a 3D view. The resulting 3D model differs from a typical feature-based 3D CAD modeling tool in that there is an underlying behavioral model and parametric layout associated with each MEMS component. The model of the complete MEMS device that is shared with the standard EDA environment can be fully parameterized with respect to manufacturing- and design-dependent variables. Another recent innovation is a process modeling tool that allows accurate and highly realistic visualization of the step-by-step creation of 3D micro-fabricated devices. The novelty of the tool lies in its use of voxels (3D pixels) rather than conventional 3D CAD techniques to represent the 3D geometry. Case studies for experimental devices are presented showing how the examination of these virtual prototypes can reveal design errors before mask tape out, support process development before actual fabrication and also enable failure analysis after manufacturing. © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd.


Zhang Z.,Massachusetts Institute of Technology | Kamon M.,Coventor Inc. | Daniel L.,Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems | Year: 2014

The voltages at which microelectromechanical actuators and sensors become unstable, known as pull-in and lift-off voltages, are critical parameters in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) design. The state-of-the-art MEMS simulators compute these parameters by simply sweeping the voltage, leading to either excessively large computational cost or to convergence failure near the pull-in or lift-off points. This paper proposes to simulate the behavior at pull-in and lift-off employing two continuation-based algorithms. The first algorithm appropriately adapts standard continuation methods, providing a complete set of static solutions. The second algorithm uses continuation to trace two kinds of curves and generates the sweep-up or sweep-down curves, which can provide more intuition for MEMS designers. The algorithms presented in this paper are robust and suitable for general-purpose industrial MEMS designs. Our algorithms have been implemented in a commercial MEMS/integrated circuits codesign tool, and their effectiveness is validated by comparisons against measurement data and the commercial finite-element/boundary-element (FEM/BEM) solver CoventorWare. © 2014 IEEE.


A virtual fabrication environment for semiconductor device structure development is discussed. The insertion of a multi-etch process step using material-specific behavioral parameters into a process sequence enables a multi-physics, multi-material etching process to be simulated using a suitable numerical technique. The multi-etch process step accurately and realistically captures a wide range of etch behavior and geometry to provide in a virtual fabrication system a semi-physical approach to modeling multi-material etches based on a small set of input parameters that characterize the etch behavior.


Patent
Coventor Inc. | Date: 2013-03-14

A virtual fabrication environment for semiconductor device structures that includes the use of virtual metrology measurement data to optimize a virtual fabrication sequence is described. Further, calibration of the virtual fabrication environment is performed by comparing virtual metrology data generated from a virtual fabrication run with a subset of measurements performed in a physical fabrication environment. Additionally, virtual experiments conducted in the virtual fabrication environment of the present invention generate multiple device structure models using ranges of process and design parameter variations for an integrated process flow and design space of interest.


Patent
Coventor Inc. | Date: 2013-03-14

A virtual fabrication environment that enables 3D Design Rule Checks (DRCs) or Optical Rule Checks (ORCs) on 3D structural models of semiconductor devices to be performed is discussed. The virtual fabrication environment may perform 3D design rule checks, such as minimum line width, minimum space between features, and minimum contact area between adjacent materials, directly in 3D without making assumptions about the translation from 2D design data to a 3D structure effected by an integrated process flow for semiconductor devices. The required number of 3D design rule checks may therefore be significantly reduced from the number of design rule checks required in 2D environments. Embodiments may also perform the 3D design rule checks for a range of statistical variations in process and design parameters.


The modeling of a DSA step within a virtual fabrication process sequence for a semiconductor device structure is discussed. A 3D model is created by the virtual fabrication that represents and depicts the possible variation that can result from applying the DSA step as part of the larger fabrication sequence for the semiconductor device structure of interest. Embodiments capture the relevant behavior caused by polymer segregation into separate domains thereby allowing the modeling of the DSA step to take place with a speed appropriate for a virtual fabrication flow.


A mechanism for identifying and modeling pattern dependent effects of processes in a 3-D Virtual Semiconductor Fabrication Environment is discussed.


A virtual fabrication environment for semiconductor device structure development is discussed that enables the use of a selective epitaxy process to virtually model epitaxial growth of a crystalline material layer. The epitaxial growth occurs on a crystalline substrate surface of a virtually fabricated model device structure. A surface growth rate may be defined over possible 3D surface orientations of the virtually fabricated device structure by modeling the growth rates of the three major families of crystal planes. Growth rates along neighboring non-crystalline material may also be modeled.


Trademark
Coventor Inc. | Date: 2016-12-02

Computer software, namely, software and software design libraries for use in the field of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS).

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