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Seth C.S.,Indian Institute of Toxicology Research | Seth C.S.,Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology Council of Scientific and Industrial Research | Misra V.,Indian Institute of Toxicology Research | Singh R.R.,University of Lucknow | Zolla L.,University of Tuscia
Plant and Soil | Year: 2011

The aim of the present study was to investigate the capability of Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) to tolerate and accumulate high amount of lead (Pb) and propose it for soil phytoremediation. To this regard, plants were grown in hydroponics and treated with different Pb concentrations (10 to 160 μM) and a fixed concentration (500 μM) EDTA (ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid) for 14 and 28 days (d). Effects on total biomass production, photosynthetic pigments and protein contents as well as the quantities of non protein thiols (NP-SH), glutathione (GSH), phytochelatins (PCs) and activity of glutathione reductase (GR) were estimated. Results revealed that roots (575 μg g-1 DW) and shoots (135 μg g-1 DW) accumulated Pb after 28 d of exposure, however, addition of EDTA enhanced the Pb accumulation in roots (645 μg g-1 DW) and shoots (255 μg g-1 DW). Exposure of Pb (28 d) registered a significant (P < 0. 05) reduction in growth parameters and induction of phytochelatins (P < 0. 05; r = 0. 26) plus some of the important antioxidants (P < 0. 05; r = 0. 42), which were positively correlated to metal accumulation. Sunflower exposed at 40 μM of Pb for 28 d synthesized higher quantity of PC2 (18. 5 fold) and PC3 (10. 5 fold), as compared to control. However, the results showed that addition of EDTA resulted in low toxicity compared to Pb alone. These data support the capability of H. annuus L. to accumulate and tolerate significant quantity of Pb and its utility for phytoremediation. This is because of the plant has the capacity to combat metal induced oxidative stress via significant synthesis of NP-SH, GSH and high activity of GR, as it would provide sufficient GSH not only for PCs synthesis but also for antioxidant function. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. Source


Rana A.,Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology Council of Scientific and Industrial Research | Bhangalia S.,Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology Council of Scientific and Industrial Research | Singh H.P.,Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology Council of Scientific and Industrial Research
Natural Product Research | Year: 2013

This study reports the isolation of a new phenylethanoid glucoside (1) from the leaves of Jacaranda mimosifolia along with jacaranone (2), followed by the comparative estimation of total antioxidant compounds, total polyphenols and total flavonoids from different solvent extracts of the leaves and flowers. The total antioxidant activity was evaluated by both DPPH and ABTS free-radical scavenging assay methods from different solvent extracts of J. mimosifolia leaves and flowers. The antioxidant activities of the purified compounds (1 and 2) were detected by DPPH-TLC method. © 2013 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC. Source


Kumar Y.,Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology Council of Scientific and Industrial Research | Hallan V.,Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology Council of Scientific and Industrial Research | Zaidi A.A.,Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology Council of Scientific and Industrial Research
Journal of General Plant Pathology | Year: 2011

In October 2009, vein yellowing disease was observed on the weeds Crassocephalum crepidioides and Ageratum conyzoides in a subtemperate region in northern India. Ageratum enation virus (AEV), along with a nanovirus like satellite DNA 1, was found to be associated with both weeds. The isolates had 99% identity with each other and with an isolate of AEV reported from Zinnia elegans from this region. To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first of any begomovirus infection in C. crepidioides in India and the first on AEV infecting C. crepidioides worldwide and A. conyzoides in India. © 2011 The Phytopathological Society of Japan and Springer. Source


Mann T.S.,Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology Council of Scientific and Industrial Research | Kiran Babu G.D.,Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology Council of Scientific and Industrial Research | Guleria S.,Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology Council of Scientific and Industrial Research | Singh B.,Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology Council of Scientific and Industrial Research
Natural Product Communications | Year: 2011

The essential oil of Eucalyptus cinerea is reported to possess a higher 1,8-cineole content than other Eucalyptus species. Variations in the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of E. cinerea oil produced by hydrodistillation (HD) and supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (SCE) techniques and a comparison between glycoside-bound and free volatile constituents produced by HD have been studied. It was found that HD produced higher oil (free volatiles) content (3.1%) as compared with SCE (1.1%), whereas bound volatiles constituted only about 0.4%. Gas chromatographic (GC) analysis of the oil samples revealed significant difference in their chemical composition. The essential oil (free volatiles) produced by HD contained 1,8-cineole (85.1%) as the major constituent, followed by α-terpineol (7.2%) and limonene (4.4%). In the bound volatile fraction produced by HD, 1,8 cineole (20.6%), α-terpineol (7.6%), p-cymene (6.3%), and limonene (4.5%) were found as major constituents. The extract produced by SCE was dominated by 1,8-cineole (70.4%), α-terpineol (8.6%), globulol (3.1%), aromadendrene (2%), citronellal (1.7%), viridiflorol (1.3%), phytol (1.1%) and terpinen-4-ol (1%). Although HD produced higher oil yields, SCE produced better extract in terms of the number of components detected. Source


Kaur P.,Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology Council of Scientific and Industrial Research | Chaudhary A.,Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology Council of Scientific and Industrial Research | Singh B.,Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology Council of Scientific and Industrial Research | Gopichand,Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology Council of Scientific and Industrial Research
Natural Product Communications | Year: 2012

Flavonoid glycosides are a significant group of compounds found in Ginkgo biloba leaves, but the long extraction procedures in existing methods are a challenging problem. In this work, a microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) method has been developed for extracting bioactive compounds from G. biloba. Several variables were optimized, such as extracting solvent, microwave power, and extraction time that can potentially affect the extraction yield. The total phenolic content, antioxidant activity (using DPPH, ABTS and FRAP assays) and flavonoid glycosides of different extracts using RP-HPLC were assessed. The antioxidant capacity was found to be highest with MAE using 60% aq. ethanol as extracting solvent and microwave power of 120W for 20 min. Source

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