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Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: KBBE.2011.2.5-02 | Award Amount: 3.97M | Year: 2012

Food security is a major concern for all countries in the face of population increase and diminishing energy and water supplies. Over one billion people in low and middle income countries suffer from malnutrition. To meet the UN Millennium Development Goals to eradicate hunger and poverty, it is essential to reduce post harvest losses, including in the fisheries sector. The overall objectives of SECUREFISH are to strengthen capacity in low cost technology; to improve the preservation of existing fish supplies; to utilise waste and bycatch to produce value-added products; to develop an integrated quality management tool and finally to test the developed technology and quality management tool in different real third country conditions. There are six work packages (WP). WP1 will ensure the efficient management of the project. WP2 will develop low cost innovative processing tools based on traditional technology for preserving fish including a solar tunnel drier, a modified solar assisted extruder and fast freezing/ continuous atmosphere freeze-drier (CAFD). In WP3, underutilised bycatch and waste by-products of fish processing will be recovered and converted to high value products. WP4 will develop an effective total quality management tool (safety and risk assessment; HACCP quality cost and traceability, nutritional and eating quality and carbon footprint) of three fish product chains (solar dried, extruded and frozen/CAFD) which will be tailored to suit local needs. The technological advances (WP2) and quality management tool (WP4) will be evaluated in the three fish product chain case studies in Africa (Kenya, Namibia, Ghana), Asia (India and Malaysia) and Latin America (Argentina) to include different economic, cultural and social conditions. The case studies involve stakeholders including SMEs to ensure sustained implementation of project results. WP6 details a strategy for education, training and dissemination to widely promote the results and guidelines.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: INCO-2007-1.5 | Award Amount: 4.92M | Year: 2008

The CAAST-Net project will establish a platform to promote improved cooperation in science and technology between Europe and Sub-Saharan Africa. To achieve this objective, CAAST-Net will analyse the current European and African S&T cooperation landscape, and undertake S&T policy analyses. Informed by the outcomes of analyses, CAAST-Net will initiate and support European-African S&T policy dialogues to advance cooperation and broker partnerships. CAAST-Net outcomes will include identification of specific research topics for European-African cooperation and their recommendation for inclusion in FP7. CAAST-Net will promote African participation in the FP7 as well as greater synergy between S&T partnerships and development cooperation instruments. Implemented by a consortium of leading European and African agencies mandated by their governments to promote international S&T cooperation, CAAST-Net will be a key instrument to support the implementation of the overall S&T cooperation programmes agreed to by the mandated authorities of the EU and the African Union (AU). CAAST-Net has been developed with the support of the AU and NEPAD. CAAST-Net has 7 Work Packages: WP1 will gather and analyse information on current European-African S&T collaboration and on S&T policies and capacities which determine opportunities for future cooperation. WP2 considers the synergy between S&T partnerships and development cooperation instruments. The S&T policy dialogue platform under WP3 will promote European-African S&T policy discussions on themes identified in WP1 to frame an enabling policy environment for S&T cooperation. WP4 will establish S&T cooperation platforms to actively promote European-African S&T partnerships, especially for SICAs under FP7. WP5 will focus on improving FP7 information and advisory capacities available to African researchers via NCPs. The focus of WP6 is knowledge management and outreach, and WP7 is dedicated to ensuring efficient project management.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: INCO.2012-1.1 | Award Amount: 4.50M | Year: 2013

In 2007, heads of state and government from Africa and Europe launched the Joint Africa-EU Strategy (JAES) formulated in response to geopolitical changes, globalisation and the processes of integration in Africa and Europe. At the heart of the JAES is an overtly political relationship and among the features distinguishing JAES from previous Africa-Europe policy initiatives is the associated action plan addressing eight priority areas for Africa-Europe cooperation. The contribution of scientific and technological research, development and innovation, and the centrality of capacity research for economic and social growth and poverty alleviation, and for addressing global societal challenges of mutual interest is explicit. The value of cooperation between the continents is central and under JAES has already led to significant achievements for mutual benefit. CAAST-Net Plus objectives encourage more and better bi-regional STI cooperation for enhanced outcomes around topics of mutual interest, and particularly in relation to the global societal challenges of climate change, food security and health. CAAST-Net Plus actions rely on bi-regional dialogue among stakeholders for gathering informed opinion and experience about the bi-regional cooperation process, formulating and disseminating it in such a way as to be admissible to the formal bi-regional STI policy dialogue process and to programme owners. Through informing the bi-regional policy dialogue for mutual learning and awareness, through building support for coordinated and innovative approaches to bilateral funding of bi-regional cooperation around global challenges, brokering the public-private relationship to foster improved uptake and translation of bi-regional research partnership outputs into innovative technologies, good and services, and through dedicated mechanisms to encourage bi-regional research partnerships, CAAST-Net Plus will make invaluable contributions to the quality and scope of the Africa-Europe STI relationship for mutual benefit.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: KBBE-2009-2-3-02 | Award Amount: 3.88M | Year: 2010

AFTER aims to revisit traditional African products, knowledge and know-how in the light of new technologies for the benefit of consumers, producers and processors in Africa and Europe. By applying European science and technology to African traditional food products, AFTER seeks to turn research into quantifiable and innovative technologies and products that are commercially viable in both European and African markets. The 10 selected products representing 3 families of foods, (fermented cereal-based, fermented salted fish and meat, and vegetable and fruit based functional foods), fit into a matrix of technologies and processes shared between Europe and Africa that will be jointly developed within the framework of AFTER. The 10 products will be characterised according to existing knowledge on technologies and processes. The improved products, produced through reengineering and new processing technologies, will be tested for consumer acceptance, safety and nutritional quality. The market and entry requirement for new products will be assessed. Involving EU and African companies in production trials for the improved products will translate the results into ready-to-use information for food companies. AFTER has 8 workpackages: Management and Coordination; Characterisation of traditional products and know-how; Process reengineering of fermented cereal based products; Process reengineering of meat and fish products; Process reengineering for traditional functional foods; Consumer and market acceptance; Appropriation of the improved processes and technologies and Dissemination and exploitation. Creating new markets and trade opportunities for improved traditional foods and novel products in Europe and Africa will increase economic returns for all stakeholders involved in the production chain, down to the community level. Due consideration will be accorded to regulatory, ethical and IPR issues while also protecting the intellectual rights of Africans.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: ENV.2009.1.1.5.1 | Award Amount: 4.66M | Year: 2010

Africa is probably the most vulnerable continent to climate change and climate variability and shows diverse range of agro-ecological and geographical features. Thus the impacts of climate change can be very high and will greatly differ across the continent, and even within countries. There is a urgent need for the most appropriate and up-to-date tools to better understand and predict climate change, assess its impact on African ecosystems and population, and develop the correct adaptation strategies. In particular the current proposal will focus on the following specific objectives: 1- Develop improved climate predictions on seasonal to decadal climatic scales, especially relevant to SSA; 2- Assess climate impacts in key sectors of SSA livelihood and economy, especially water resources and agriculture; 3- Evaluate the vulnerability of ecosystems and civil population to inter-annual variations and longer trends (10 years) in climate; 4- Suggest and analyse new suited adaptation strategies, focused on local needs; 5- Develop a new concept of 10 years monitoring and forecasting warning system, useful for food security, risk management and civil protection in SSA; 6- Analyse the economic impacts of climate change on agriculture and water resources in SSA and the cost-effectiveness of potential adaptation measures. This objectives will be achieved by an integrated working approach that involves 9 European, 8 African and 1 International Organization.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: KBBE.2011.2.5-02 | Award Amount: 3.75M | Year: 2012

Cassava and yam are important food security crops for approximately 700 million people. Post-harvest losses are significant and come in the three forms: (a) physical; (b) economic through discounting or processing into low value products and (c) from bio-wastes. This project aims to reduce these losses to enhance the role that these crops play in food and income security. Post-harvest physical losses are exceptionally high (ca. 30% in cassava and 60% in yam) and occur throughout the food chain. Losses in economic value are also high (e.g. cassava prices discounted by up to 85% within a couple of days of harvest). Wastes come in various forms e.g. peeling losses can be 15-20%. Waste often has no economic value which can make processing a marginal business proposition. South-south learning is a feature of the project with partners in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. Cassava and yam are contrasting in terms of their use and these differences will contribute to developing a comprehensive approach to reducing losses. Technologies and systems will be developed, validated, demonstrated and disseminated that focus benefits on small-holder households whilst offering increased income earning opportunities through SME development and links to large scale industry. These contribute to the comprehensiveness of the approach, and provide diverse learning opportunities and allow examination of losses in a wider food security context. There are 3 impact pathways: 1. reduction of physical losses focussing on fresh yams storage 2. value added processing reducing physical and economic losses in yam and cassava. 3. improved utilisation of wastes (peels, liquid waste, spent brewery waste) producing products for human consumption including snack foods, mushrooms and animal feed. Cross-cutting are issues of food safety, enterprise development and practical demonstration. It is aimed to validate technologies capable of reducing losses by an equivalent of at least 50%


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: SSH.2013.2.1-3 | Award Amount: 2.88M | Year: 2014

MNEmerge Project aims to address the issues raised in this call together with a consortium that consists of top European universities, international organisations and multinational enterprises. We wish to provide a comprehensive framework, case study methodology and policy analysis of the activities of MNE and organisations operating in- and outside of EU. We are mostly interested on activities that take part in India, Brazil and Africa. The consortium has been an active contributor to the multinationals research and it has expertise on studying societal problems in emerging markets. The research will be carried out by an international, interdisciplinary team, involving researchers from Finnish, British and Dutch institutes. The issues studied in this project are varied but there is a common thread uniting all of its sub-themes; namely they all relate to how MNE activities in terms of one of the following: FDI, business functioning, technology and innovation strategies, corporate philanthropy or socially responsible investment, can contribute to the attainment of poverty alleviation, food security, health security and environmental security, which are intimately interlinked. The objectives of the project are: 1. Development of a framework to analyse MNE impact towards socio-economic development 2. Development of a model that describes the relationship between MNE, FDI and the economy 3. Role of public policies in supporting responsible business practises and the Millennium Declaration Goals 4. Case Studies to support the methodological framework model on health, environment and energy We identify modes of MNE collaboration with other societal stakeholders including the State, which permit the business sustainability while ensuring sustainable development of society as a whole with the environment being a passive stakeholder. We will also develop tools and aids for decision making that can facilitate the implementation of the aforesaid recommendations.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: SFS-06-2014 | Award Amount: 1.78M | Year: 2015

PROIntensAfrica intends to develop a proposal for a long term research and innovation partnership between Europe and Africa, focusing on the improvement of the food and nutrition security and the livelihoods of African farmers by exploring and exploiting the diversity of pathways to sustainable intensification of African agro-food systems. The exploration will include environmental, economic and social externalities along the whole value chains. PROIntensAfrica has the ambition to formulate a research and innovation agenda, identifying the domains in need for further research to realize the potential of African food systems. In addition, PROIntensAfrica will suggest governance mechanisms that are effective in supporting the partnership. Key is the perception that pooling resources is the best way to align existing and initiate new research. This perception follows the policy of the EC, where instruments of joint programming like ERA-NET, JPI and article 185 aim to accomplish synergy and increase the effectiveness of resources. Pooling resources goes beyond the scientific domain and reaches into the policy domain. Consequently, besides being rooted in sound and challenging research, a partnership proposal needs to meet national and international policies to fly. Therefore PROIntensAfrica pay specific attention to engage with the policy domain, as exemplified by the intended creation of a policy support group. The rationale of the project is that a variety of pathways leads to sustainable intensification of African food systems. Different pathways are advocated in literature. High-input farming systems, for example, contrast with organic farming systems, each with their own supporters and criticasters. It is the conviction of the PROIntensAfrica consortium that moving beyond that debate will open exciting new pathways, and that combining elements of different systems will yield innovative systems that are optimally adapted to specific contexts.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: KBBE.2012.3.4-01 | Award Amount: 3.89M | Year: 2012

The project will develop environmentally appropriate and socio-economically sustainable biotechnological processes for converting biodegradable fractions of identified African and Mediterranean agricultural and industrial waste as well as fractions of municipal and animal solid waste into food, feed, value-added products for nutraceuticals and healthcare, biogas and organic based fertilizer. Integrated processes will combine sugar conversion from mainly amylopectins and starchy materials into proteins (for food and feed) with biogas and fertilizer production done in co-digestion of municipal solid waste and manure. Left over sugars from protein production will be used to produce amino acids and lactic acid by bacterial conversion of biowaste to upgrade the fertilizer and for fruit waste storage and food conservation. The technologies to be developed will rely on simple and locally available equipment and naturally occurring microorganisms. Life cycle analysis and socio-economic studies will be undertaken to ensure local applicability in the target countries. The project will contribute to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals by improving the management of biowastes in developing countries and thus reducing their potential adverse impacts on human and animal health, the environment and the economy. With partners from Africa, Asia, Europe and the Middle East, the project also provides an opportunity for EU researchers and third country partners to network and share experiences and best practices. The involvement of small-and medium sized enterprises will contribute to EUs industrial competitiveness by exposing them to new markets and new product opportunities from waste utilization. Research activities will be accompanied by proof of concept at SMEs and demonstrations by local communities and NGOs. Exchange of best proactices and knowledge-sharing among project partners will be emphasised


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) - South African researchers developing the world’s largest machine for producing aircraft parts using lasers to melt powdered titanium are in talks with Airbus and Boeing, with the first commercial application expected in 2019. Officially launched in 2011 and backed by government, the Aeroswift research project last year produced its first three demonstrator parts – a pilot’s throttle lever, a condition lever grip which is part of the throttle assembly, and a fuel tank pylon bracket, in a digital process known as 3D printing, or additive layer manufacturing. Increasingly adopted by the automotive, aerospace and military industries as a cheaper way of making complex parts, the new manufacturing process could save millions of dollars on fuel and production costs as aircraft makers replace aluminum bodies with lighter materials such as titanium alloys. "How best to commercialize the process is a discussion we are currently having with the Aeroswift partners and relevant government agencies," said Simon Ward, Airbus's vice president for international cooperation in Toulouse. Ward said Airbus was in talks with Aeroswift and the South African government to ensure the project was commercially successful and created jobs in South Africa, where unemployment runs above 25 percent. Airbus, which already sources parts for its A400M military transport aircraft from South Africa, has been offering Aeroswift support in terms of consulting, benchmark information and advice on what type of aircraft components to focus on, Ward said. South Africa’s Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), in partnership with local aerospace firm Aerosud Innovation Centre, say access to vast titanium reserves as well as pioneering the world’s largest titanium powder-based 3D printing machine should give them a competitive edge. South Africa ranks fourth in world titanium reserves, behind leader China, Australia and India, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. "Our machine is unique and the only one in the world,” said Hardus Greyling, Aeroswift's contract coordinator who works at the CSIR's laser center. “We have developed new technologies and patents which allows us to upscale the additive process to go significantly faster and significantly larger than other systems." During proof of concept trials, the machine achieved production speeds up to 10 times faster than currently available commercial laser melting machines, he said. Its production chamber's volume measures up to 2 meters by 600 millimeters by 600 mm – about four times larger than the biggest commercial machines currently available, which operate at dimensions of 600 mm by 500 mm by 400 mm, said Greyling. Terry Wohlers, president of U.S.-based industry consultancy Wohlers Associates, said after initial doubts his optimism for the project was rekindled when learning that the first parts demonstrated would be in test flights this year. "It looks like the people at Aerosud and CSIR are on track and making very good progress toward carving out a slice of what is set to become a 3D printing market valued at tens of billions of dollars," he told Reuters. South Africa has a long established defense and aerospace industry centered on state-owned group Denel SOC [DENSC.UL] and also exports various components including antennae and seat frames for use in commercial jets.

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