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— Global Urinary Incontinence Products Industry Report offers market overview, segmentation by types, application, countries, key manufactures, cost analysis, industrial chain, sourcing strategy, downstream buyers, marketing strategy analysis, distributors/traders, factors affecting market, forecast and other important information for key insight. Companies profiled in this report are Kimberly-Clark, Sca, Unicharm, Procter & Gamble, First Quality Enterprises, Domtar, Medline, 3m, Covidien, B Braun, Cotton Incorporated, Tranquility, Hengan Group, Coco, Chiaus, Fuburg, Aab Group, Coloplast, Convatec, Flexicare Medical, Hollister, Marlen Manufacturing & Development in terms of Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors, Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017). Split by Product Types, with sales, revenue, price, market share of each type, can be divided into • Urine Absorbents • Urine Accepted Products/ Incontinence Bags • Others Split by applications, this report focuses on sales, market share and growth rate of Urinary Incontinence Products in each application, can be divided into • Hospital • Homecare • Nursing Homes • Others Purchase a copy of this report at: https://www.themarketreports.com/report/buy-now/424287 Table of Content: 1 Urinary Incontinence Products Market Overview 2 Global Urinary Incontinence Products Sales, Revenue (Value) and Market Share by Manufacturers 3 Global Urinary Incontinence Products Sales, Revenue (Value) by Countries, Type and Application (2012-2017) 4 Global Urinary Incontinence Products Manufacturers Profiles/Analysis 5 North America Urinary Incontinence Products Sales, Revenue (Value) by Countries, Type and Application (2012-2017) 6 Latin America Urinary Incontinence Products Sales, Revenue (Value) by Countries, Type and Application (2012-2017) 7 Europe Urinary Incontinence Products Sales, Revenue (Value) by Countries, Type and Application (2012-2017) 8 Asia-Pacific Urinary Incontinence Products Sales, Revenue (Value) by Countries, Type and Application (2012-2017) 9 Middle East and Africa Urinary Incontinence Products Sales, Revenue (Value) by Countries, Type and Application (2012-2017) 10 Urinary Incontinence Products Manufacturing Cost Analysis 11 Industrial Chain, Sourcing Strategy and Downstream Buyers 12 Marketing Strategy Analysis, Distributors/Traders 13 Market Effect Factors Analysis 14 Global Urinary Incontinence Products Market Forecast (2017-2022) 15 Research Findings and Conclusion 16 Appendix Inquire more for more details about this report at: https://www.themarketreports.com/report/ask-your-query/424287 For more information, please visit https://www.themarketreports.com/report/2017-2022-global-top-countries-urinary-incontinence-products-market-report


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

JACKSON, Tenn. - The Weed Science Society of America (WSSA) awarded the title of Outstanding Paper in Weed Technology to researchers from the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture. Matthew Wiggins, a recent Ph.D. graduate of UT's College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources and Robert Hayes and Larry Steckel, both professors with UT's Department of Plant Sciences, co-authored the paper. "Evaluating Cover Crops and Herbicides for Glyphosate Resistant Palmer Amaranth Control in Cotton" appeared in Weed Technology in April 2016. The research evaluated four cover crops (cereal rye, crimson clover, hairy vetch and winter wheat) plus combinations of one grass and one legume followed by pre-emergence applications of fluometuron or acetochlor. The study showed that combinations of grass and legume cover crops accumulated the most biomass and reduced Palmer amaranth emergence by half compared to non-cover-treated areas. However, by 28 days after application, the cereal rye and wheat cover crops provided the best Palmer amaranth control. Herbicide-resistant weeds are a significant threat to agronomic crop production across the globe. Besides lost yields, Steckel estimates the costs of additional management can run from $35 - $100 per acre, depending on the crop. Integrating cultural practices, like cover crops, in weed management programs has been a central theme in UTIA weed science research for the past decade as scientists search for solutions to herbicide resistance. The Outstanding Paper award was presented February 6, 2017, during WSSA's annual meeting in Tucson, Arizona. "We're proud to honor true innovators who are making a significant mark on weed science through their commitment to research, education and teaching," said Janis McFarland, 2017 annual meeting program chair and incoming president of WSSA. The study was conducted at the West Tennessee AgResearch and Education Center in Jackson, Tennessee, and was partially funded by Cotton Incorporated through the Tennessee Cotton State Support Committee. Through its mission of research, teaching and extension, the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture touches lives and provides Real. Life. Solutions. ag.tennessee.edu


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Cotton Incorporated and PurThread Technologies, Inc. announce a collaboration to bring PurThread’s permanently embedded anti-odor solution to cotton knit and woven fabrics. Retail brands and consumers alike continue to seek fabrics that lend performance attributes while maintaining the luxurious look and feel of cotton. Cotton Incorporated has developed cotton-rich fabrics with PurThread that offer a nice hand and uniform colors, all while offering permanent anti-odor benefits. PurThread’s inherent antimicrobial technology incorporates EPA-registered recycled silver salts into staple fiber and filament yarn at the extrusion level. This lends permanent fabric protection from odor-causing bacteria, mold, mildew and fungus, yielding antimicrobial benefits that do not wash away or wear off for the life of the fabric. It also does not change the fabric’s physical characteristics. “Consumers know and love cotton, and they have come to expect performance technologies like odor control in their athletic apparel. The continued growth of the athleisure category creates an ideal opportunity to expand established athletic apparel performance technologies to additional categories, such as denim," explained Mark Messura, Cotton Incorporated Senior Vice President, Global Supply Chain Marketing. "The fabrics created through this collaboration maintain the look and feel of cotton and add long-lasting anti-odor properties. The PurThread technology is effective and does not impact fabric design. We look forward to sharing these developments with the industry because we believe they are the right innovation at the right time.” “We are pleased to have our antimicrobial efficacy validated by such a highly regarded organization,” said Lisa Grimes, CEO of PurThread Technologies. “Blending PurThread with cotton to offer permanent antimicrobial protection offers tangible benefits – apparel can be worn for longer periods of time between washings, helping to reduce water consumption and energy usage. This is an exciting collaboration that should yield some great new performance fabrics across multiple markets.” About Cotton Incorporated Cotton Incorporated, funded by U.S. cotton producers and importers of cotton and cotton textile products, conducts worldwide research and promotion activities to increase the demand for and profitability of cotton. For more information, visit http://www.cottoninc.com. About PurThread Technologies PurThread Technologies, Inc. employs technology to embed a proprietary blend of EPA-registered recycled silver salts into the core of fiber. As a result, PurThread yarns inherently protect fabric from the effects of microbial contamination and reduce odor-causing bacteria, mold, mildew and fungus. Products made with PurThread range from healthcare textiles, such as privacy curtains and scrubs, to freshness products, such as performance athletic wear, socks and gear for emergency first responders. The EPA has not yet reviewed any public health claims for PurThread products. PurThread yarns are 100% Made in the USA. For more information, visit http://www.purthread.com.


News Article | November 14, 2016
Site: www.newsmaker.com.au

MarketStudyReport.com adds “Global Urinary Incontinence Market by Manufacturers, Regions, Type and Application, Forecast to 2021” new report to its research database. The report spread across 111 pages with table and figures in it. Urinary incontinence products, such as pads, are not a cure for urinary incontinence; however, using these pads and other devices to contain urine loss and maintain skin integrity are extremely useful in selected cases. Absorbent products used include underpads, pant liners (shields and guards), adult diapers (briefs), a variety of washable pants, and disposable pad systems, or combinations of these products. Scope of the Report: This report focuses on the Urinary Incontinence in Global market, especially in North America, Europe and Asia-Pacific, South America, Middle East and Africa. This report categorizes the market based on manufacturers, regions, type and application. Market Segment by Manufacturers, this report covers Kimberly-Clark SCA Unicharm Procter & Gamble First Quality Enterprises Domtar Medline 3M Covidien B Braun Cotton Incorporated Tranquility Hengan Group Coco Chiaus Fuburg AAB Group Coloplast ConvaTec Flexicare Medical Hollister Marlen Manufacturing & Development Market Segment by Regions, regional analysis covers North America (USA, Canada and Mexico) Europe (Germany, France, UK, Russia and Italy) Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India and Southeast Asia) South America, Middle East and Africa Market Segment by Type, covers Urine Absorbents Urine Accepted Products/ Incontinence Bags Others Market Segment by Applications, can be divided into Hospital Homecare Nursing Homes Others Browse full table of contents and data tables at https://www.marketstudyreport.com/reports/global-urinary-incontinence-market-by-manufacturers-regions-type-and-application-forecast-to-2021/ There are 13 Chapters to deeply display the global Urinary Incontinence market. Chapter 1, to describe Urinary Incontinence Introduction, product scope, market overview, market opportunities, market risk, market driving force; Chapter 2, to analyze the top manufacturers of Urinary Incontinence, with sales, revenue, and price of Urinary Incontinence, in 2015 and 2016; Chapter 3, to display the competitive situation among the top manufacturers, with sales, revenue and market share in 2015 and 2016; Chapter 4, to show the global market by regions, with sales, revenue and market share of Urinary Incontinence, for each region, from 2011 to 2016; Chapter 5, 6, 7 and 8, to analyze the key regions, with sales, revenue and market share by key countries in these regions; Chapter 9 and 10, to show the market by type and application, with sales market share and growth rate by type, application, from 2011 to 2016; Chapter 11, Urinary Incontinence market forecast, by regions, type and application, with sales and revenue, from 2016 to 2021; Chapter 12 and 13, to describe Urinary Incontinence sales channel, distributors, traders, dealers, appendix and data source. To receive personalized assistance write to us @ [email protected] with the report title in the subject line along with your questions or call us at +1 866-764-2150


News Article | December 21, 2016
Site: phys.org

In a paper published Dec. 20 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, NC State researchers and colleagues from the Danforth Plant Science Center, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Cotton Incorporated describe how they used genomic and molecular tools to find the location of the DNA sequence that determines major leaf shapes in upland cotton. The researchers also describe how they manipulated the genetic code to alter the shape of a cotton plant's leaves in potentially beneficial ways. This discovery represents a significant step toward developing cotton varieties that produce higher yields at less cost to the farmers, said Vasu Kuraparthy, an associate professor with NC State's Department of Crop and Soil Sciences and the project's principal investigator. Scientists have recognized that cotton plants with leaves that have five deep lobes, like the leaves of the okra plant, offer advantages to farmers over what researchers refer to as "normal" leaves. Dr. Ryan Andres, a postdoctoral researcher who worked in Kuraparthy's lab while he was a graduate student, said the so-called "okra" leaf cottons are less susceptible to boll rot than the stably yielding "normal" leaf cotton varieties. The okra leaves also allow a spray to be more evenly dispersed across a plant and are associated with higher rates of flowering and earlier rates of maturity in cotton, Andres added. To determine if they'd found the DNA sequence that controlled major leaf shapes in cotton, researchers infected okra-leaf plants with a modified virus that silenced the target gene. That led to a temporary production of normal leaves until the plants overcame the experimental virus and reverted to okra leaf shape. Kuraparthy and Andres said they hope that this leaf architecture leads to an ideal cotton cultivar, or ideotype, capable of combining the advantages of the two leaf shapes. "We were able to create our ideotype but only in a transient fashion. One day we want to able to do it in a heritable manner, and the first step in that is finding the gene and proving that this is the gene and these are the polymorphisms in the gene that cause these changes," Kuraparthy said. "This research does that." Explore further: A small piece of DNA with a large effect on leaf shape More information: Modifications to a LATE MERISTEM IDENTITY-1 gene are responsible for the major leaf shapes of Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) doi: doi.org/10.1101/062612


News Article | December 21, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Researchers know that the variation in leaf shapes can mean big differences in a farmer's bottom line. Now, a new discovery gives plant breeders key genetic information they need to develop crop varieties that make the most of these leaf-shape differences. In a paper published Dec. 20 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, NC State researchers and colleagues from the Danforth Plant Science Center, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Cotton Incorporated describe how they used genomic and molecular tools to find the location of the DNA sequence that determines major leaf shapes in upland cotton. The researchers also describe how they manipulated the genetic code to alter the shape of a cotton plant's leaves in potentially beneficial ways. This discovery represents a significant step toward developing cotton varieties that produce higher yields at less cost to the farmers, said Dr. Vasu Kuraparthy, an associate professor with NC State's Department of Crop and Soil Sciences and the project's principal investigator. Scientists have recognized that cotton plants with leaves that have five deep lobes, like the leaves of the okra plant, offer advantages to farmers over what researchers refer to as "normal" leaves. Dr. Ryan Andres, a postdoctoral researcher who worked in Kuraparthy's lab while he was a graduate student, said the so-called "okra" leaf cottons are less susceptible to boll rot than the stably yielding "normal" leaf cotton varieties. The okra leaves also allow a spray to be more evenly dispersed across a plant and are associated with higher rates of flowering and earlier rates of maturity in cotton, Andres added. To determine if they'd found the DNA sequence that controlled major leaf shapes in cotton, researchers infected okra-leaf plants with a modified virus that silenced the target gene. That led to a temporary production of normal leaves until the plants overcame the experimental virus and reverted to okra leaf shape. Kuraparthy and Andres said they hope that this leaf architecture leads to an ideal cotton cultivar, or ideotype, capable of combining the advantages of the two leaf shapes. "We were able to create our ideotype but only in a transient fashion. One day we want to able to do it in a heritable manner, and the first step in that is finding the gene and proving that this is the gene and these are the polymorphisms in the gene that cause these changes," Kuraparthy said. "This research does that." Note to Editors: The study abstract follows. "Modifications to a LATE MERISTEM IDENTITY-1 gene are responsible for the major leaf shapes of Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)" Published: Dec. 20, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America ABSTRACT: Leaf shape varies spectacularly among plants. Leaves are the primary source of photo-assimilate in crop plants and understanding the genetic basis of variation in leaf morphology is critical to improving agricultural productivity. Leaf shape played a unique role in cotton improvement, as breeders have selected for entire and lobed leaf morphs resulting from a single locus, okra (L-D1), which is responsible for the major leaf shapes in cotton. The L-D1 locus is not only of agricultural importance in cotton, but through pioneering chimeric and morphometric studies it has contributed to fundamental knowledge about leaf development. Here we show that an HD-Zip transcription factor homologous to the LATE MERISTEM IDENTITY1 (LMI1) gene of Arabidopsis is the causal gene underlying the L-D1 locus. The classical okra leaf shape allele has a 133-bp tandem duplication in the promoter, correlated with elevated expression, while an 8-bp deletion in the third exon of the presumed wild-type normal allele causes a frame-shifted and truncated coding sequence. Our results indicate that sub-okra is the ancestral leaf shape of tetraploid cotton that gave rise to the okra allele and that normal is a derived mutant allele that came to predominate and define the leaf shape of cultivated cotton. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of the LMI1-like gene in an okra variety was sufficient to induce normal leaf formation. The developmental changes in leaves conferred by this gene are associated with a photosynthetic transcriptomic signature, substantiating its use by breeders to produce a superior cotton ideotype.


Webster T.M.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Nichols R.L.,Cotton Incorporated
Weed Science | Year: 2012

Changes in the weed flora of cropping systems reflect the impacts of factors that create safe sites for weed establishment and facilitate the influx and losses to and from the soil seedbank. This analysis of the annual surveys of the Southern Weed Science Society documents changes in the weed flora of the 14 contiguous southern states since the advent of transgenic, herbicide-resistant crops. In 1994 and 2009, the top five weeds in corn were morningglories, Texas millet, broadleaf signalgrass, johnsongrass, and sicklepod; in this same period Palmer amaranth, smartweeds, and goosegrass had the greatest increases in importance in corn. In cotton, morningglories and nutsedges were among the top five most troublesome weeds in 1995 and 2009. Palmer amaranth, pigweeds, and Florida pusley were also among the five most troublesome species in 2009; the weeds with the largest increases in importance in cotton were common ragweed and two species with tolerance to glyphosate, Benghal dayflower and Florida pusley. In soybean, morningglories, nutsedges, and sicklepod were among the top five weed species in 1995 and 2009. Two species with glyphosate resistance, Palmer amaranth and horseweed, were the second and fourth most troublesome weeds of soybean in 2009. In wheat, the top four weeds in 2008 were the same as those in 1994 and included Italian ryegrass, wild garlic, wild radish, and henbit. Crop production in the southern region is a mosaic of various crop rotations, soil types, and types of tillage. During the interval between the surveys, the predominant change in weed management practices in the region and the nation was the onset and rapid dominance of the use of glyphosate in herbicide-resistant cultivars of corn, cotton, and soybean. Because of the correspondence between the effects of glyphosate on the respective weed species and the observed changes in the weed flora of the crops, it is likely the very broad use of glyphosate was a key component shaping the changes in weed flora. Only eight of the top 15 most troublesome weeds of cotton and soybean, the crops with the greatest use of glyphosate, were the same in 1995 and 2009. In contrast, in corn and wheat where adoption of glyphosate-resistant cultivars lags or is absent, 12 of the 15 most troublesome weeds were the same in 1994 and 2008. These findings show on a regional scale that weeds adapt to recurrent selection from herbicides, currently the predominant weed management tool. Future research should seek methods to hinder the rapid spread of herbicide-tolerant and evolution of herbicide-resistant weed species. As new tools are developed, research should focus on ways to preserve the efficacy of those tools through improved stewardship. © 2012 Weed Science Society of America.


Singh V.,Texas Tech University | Kendall R.J.,Texas Tech University | Hake K.,Cotton Incorporated | Ramkumar S.,Texas Tech University
Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research | Year: 2013

Since the recent Deepwater Horizon Gulf of Mexico oil spill, the need for environmentally friendly oil sorbents has intensified. This study deals with the sorption of crude oil by raw cotton, a biodegradable sorbent. To our best knowledge, the data related to crude oil sorption by unprocessed raw cotton and correlation with cotton characteristics such as micronaire, fineness, and maturity are unavailable. More importantly, our work quantifies the oil sorption (g/g) of low micronaire (immature) cotton. Results showed at the minimum level, low micronaire raw cotton has 30.5 g/g crude oil sorption capacity. Furthermore, the crude oil sorption capacity of low micronaire cotton was significantly higher than the sorption capacity of high micronaire cotton. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and environmental scanning electron microscopy analyses support the correlation between the quality characteristics of raw cotton and its oil sorption capacity. In contrast to synthetic sorbents, raw cotton with its high crude oil sorption capacity and positive environmental footprint make it an ecologically friendly sorbent for oil spill cleanups. © 2013 American Chemical Society.


Patent
Cotton Incorporated and The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of Agriculture | Date: 2015-07-17

Systems and methods for removing material, e.g., linters, from seeds, e.g., ginned cottonseeds, are provided. The systems and methods involve rotating the seeds in a rotatable drum having a plurality of longitudinal brushes. The centrifugal force created by the rotation of the drum and the plurality of longitudinal brushes urge the seeds against an interior surface of the drum that is lined with a brush insert. In this way, work is performed that removes the material from the exterior of the seeds. The material is removed using reduced pressure and the processed seeds are removed. The system may include a brush insert that is easily removed from the rotatable drum. Other systems and methods are disclosed.


Patent
Cotton Incorporated and The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of Agriculture | Date: 2014-04-23

Systems and methods for removing material, e.g., linters, from seeds, e.g., ginned cottonseeds, are provided. The systems and methods involve rotating the seeds in a rotatable drum having a plurality of longitudinal brushes. The centrifugal force created by the rotation of the drum and the plurality of longitudinal brushes urge the seeds against an interior surface of the drum that is lined with a brush insert. In this way, work is performed that removes the material from the exterior of the seeds. The material is removed using reduced pressure and the processed seeds are removed. The system may include a brush insert that is easily removed from the rotatable drum. Other systems and methods are disclosed.

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