Cotton Incorporated

Cary, NC, United States

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Cary, NC, United States

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News Article | May 19, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

National Prevention Week: The Effectiveness of Worksite Programs in Reducing Opioid Abuse Dr. Joel Bennett CEO and Founder Organizational Wellness & Learning Systems, Inc. (OWLS) While the opioid and prescription drug epidemic has received considerable attention given the over 300,000 people it affects annually, relatively few realize the impact it's also having on the nation's workforce. It's become increasingly commonplace for employees to use prescription medication outside of intended use to improve job performance, overcome lack of sleep, or to alleviate pain. Although 70% of employers are negatively impacted by Rx abuse, less than 25% educate workers on prevention. Thirty percent do not provide access to alternative treatments. Says Dr. Bennett: "Employers are starting to realize the negative effects of Rx abuse on employee readiness, morale and productivity. But prevention programs can be a hard sell -- it's a challenge to demonstrate a concrete business return. Employers need to know that worksite awareness and education programs can be very effective in engaging people at the earliest stages of their Rx use and in a non-threatening way, steer them to safe alternatives. SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration) has laid out criteria and guidelines for evidence-based programs that produce positive outcomes; if properly implemented at the worksite, these programs have the potential to effectively educate a sizeable portion of at-risk employees who are otherwise hard to identify, let alone reach." Dr. Bennett is a widely sought-after speaker, consultant, and source on issues pertaining to evidence-based wellness. He has also published in a broad variety of academic, industry and business publications and consults internationally. ProfNet Profile: http://www.profnetconnect.com/joel_bennett Website: http://organizationalwellness.com Contact: Charles Epstein, che@backboneinc.com AI and Machine Learning in Medical Imaging Martin Hedlund Chief Technology Officer ContextVision "The concept of AI and machine learning has the potential to change the game of medical imaging. We can train neural networks with much more data than humans experience during a lifetime. This means that we can reproduce the competence of the best experts, or even outperform them! We can guarantee reproducibility in exams and diagnosis, and avoid human subjectivity and variations. With active learning models, results can continuously be improved. With better ground truth, i.e. data from different sources, time or outcome, AI can make better predictions, solve more complex tasks and make new discoveries." Based in Stockholm, Sweden, Hedlund is the chief technology officer and one of the founders of ContextVision. He finished his M.Sc. degree of Technology followed by further studies and research in image processing and GOP theory at Linköping University. He was R&D and site manager in Linköping until 1999 and has since served as CTO by focusing on strategic product and business development. Hedlund is spearheading the research and development of ContextVision's first AI-based imaging technology. By using algorithms, the product will be able to evaluate and enhance image quality automatically without the direct involvement of a clinical expert. This will improve workflow and improve diagnosis, and ultimately aid both patients and radiologists. Website: www.contextvision.com Contact: Stephanie Ross, sross@mower.com The Most Important Body Part You're Not Working Out Jonathan Jordan Personal Trainer, Nutrition Coach and Fitness Blogger Jonathan Jordan Fitness "As a successful personal trainer for Equinox in San Francisco, I've worked with hundreds of clients. They want to be lean. They want to be strong. They want to be healthy. But no one ever says, 'I want strong feet and mobile ankles.' Yet weak feet are often the biggest roadblocks to achieving their health goals. The ankle is one of our most important and commonly overlooked joints. Pain and injuries in the knees, hips and lower back can often be traced to issues at the ankle joint. Think of how often and how many ways we use our ankles: walking, running, biking, squatting, yoga, balancing, dancing -- you get the idea. If the muscles acting on your ankle are chronically tight or if the joint itself is jammed or lacks proper mobility, the impact can be painful and damaging, as the body will compensate at other joints to accommodate movement." Jordan recently wrote a blog post (see link below) that goes deep into the anatomy of the foot and includes an interview with physical therapist Dr. Sarah Jay. He has also included videos for his three favorite ankle mobility drills. He is available for interviews to help your readers, listeners, or viewers improve their ankle mobility, reduce pain and improve performance in their workouts Blog post: http://www.jj-fit.com/blog/ankle ProfNet Profile: http://www.profnetconnect.com/jonathan_jordan Website: http://www.jj-fit.com Expert Contact: jj@jj-fit.com Can Stress Actually Kill You? Dr. Frieda Birnbaum Research Psychologist, Psychoanalyst Stress may take a toll on your mind, body, and heart, according to a new study from Massachusetts General Hospital and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Researchers observed a strong correlation between activity in the amygdala -- the part of the brain activated by stress -- and subsequent cardiac events, such as heart attack, stroke, and angina. Says Dr. Birnbaum: "Our bodies are constantly reacting and responding to how we are thinking. If we stay locked into a state of high stress and anxiety for a prolonged period of time, our physical health will be affected for the worse. Yes, stress can kill you. However, there are many things a person can do to help manage their stress or remove it all together. One of the first things is to get to the root cause of the matter and resolve it, especially if it has something to do with guilt. Guilt is a powerful negative emotion that can prolong stress. If your boss or fellow employees have become a cause of stress, do whatever you can to be as far removed from them as possible, even if it means leaving your job. Any form or daily meditating or walking is another means of quieting your mind and opening doors of inner peace. Listening to peaceful music is also helpful. Stress is reactionary -- and you have the power to change how to react." Based in the New York metro area, Dr. Birnbaum is author of "Life Begins at 60: A New View on Motherhood, Marriage, and Reinventing Ourselves." She's an expert on depression, women's issues, and attaining happiness. Website: http://www.doctorfrieda.com Contact: Ryan McCormick, ryan@goldmanmccormick.com Showtime's 'Billions' Predicts the Future Michael Klein, PsyD Psychologist, Principal MK Insights LLC Dr. Klein is available to speak about the relevance of the TV character Wendy Rhodes, an in-house psychiatrist in the fictitious firm of Axe Capital, as well as the history and trends behind this role. As a psychologist, he can address how personality, emotional intelligence, and motivators impact decision-making, management style, and potential "de-railing" behaviors: "It is impossible to work effectively in any job without running into roadblocks periodically. In-house psychiatrists and psychologists don't provide therapy at work but, rather, apply sound psychological insights and tools to help employees and managers be effective at work based on their own interest in achievement and managing psychological barriers." Dr. Klein is a psychologist, workplace coach, and in-house performance consultant. He is also author of "Trapped in the Family Business: A practical guide to understanding and managing this hidden dilemma." Book: www.trappedinthefamilybusiness.com Website: www.mkinsights.com Expert Contact: mklein@mkinsights.com Fireworks Safety Jenny Ziembicki, M.D. Medical Director, UPMC Mercy Burn Center Assistant Professor of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine Faculty Member, McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine "Each year, around 4th of July celebrations, we treat many people, especially children and teens, who have been injured by fireworks. Many of those injuries involve an amputation of a limb or loss of vision. We want to remind everyone that fireworks should only be handled by professionals and enjoyed at a safe distance." Dr. Ziembicki has a special interest in the development of the comprehensive outpatient burn therapy program at UPMC Mercy, which allows patients a more expedient return to a productive lifestyle. She also is a dedicated advocate in burn injury prevention, especially in the geriatric and pediatric population. Bio: http://www.mirm.pitt.edu/our-people/faculty-staff-bios/jenny-ziembicki-md/ Contact: Stephanie Stanley, stanleysl@upmc.edu Skin Damage and Car/Home Windows Darrell Smith Executive Director International Window Film Association "Whether you're spending the summer on the road or enjoying the warm sunshine streaming through your home's windows, you may be doing serious damage to your skin without even realizing. The average window only blocks about 25% of UV rays from passing through and car windows aren't much better -- blocking about 40% of UV rays. In America, nearly 53% of skin cancer cases occur on the left, or driver's side, of the body. Why? Because, we enjoy sunshine but aren't fully protected against damaging UV rays -- and spend a lot of time in the car! Professionally installed window film can help block up to 99% of UV rays from passing through a window, ultimately protecting your skin and eyes from cumulative damage." Website: www.iwfa.com Contact: Amber Joy Dempsey, amber@warnerpr.com Fabric and Clothing Tips for Summer James Pruden Senior Director Cotton Incorporated Pruden can provide expert summer safety tips when it comes to anything and everything summer clothing, including what to wear for the best UV protection; what fabrics keep you cooler during the warm summer months; and the health benefits of natural fibers vs. synthetic fibers. Says Pruden: "All apparel provides some degree of UV protection. UV protection in apparel is dependent on a variety of factors, including thickness of fabric (thicker fabrics absorb more UV rays), tightness of construction and the fabric's color (darker colors provide more UV protection)." Pruden is senior director of public relations at Cotton Incorporated, where he oversees brand image management for the not-for-profit company. Contact: Caleb Fernandez, caleb.fernandez@fleishman.com Pool Safety Tips for Parents, Children and Pets Tom Casey Vice President of Sales Anthony & Sylvan Pools Casey is available to share pool safety tips for parents, children, and pets: "Pools are fun for the whole family, and pool safety is crucial when it comes to enjoying your pool to its fullest. By following just a few safety tips, you'll be sure to keep this season fun and safe." Casey is vice president of sales for Anthony & Sylvan Pools, the leading swimming pool and spa builder in the U.S. Contact: John Reynolds, john.reynolds@buchananpr.com Tips for an Injury-Free Summer Dr. Benjamin Domb "As the weather gets warmer and the days get longer, adults and kids alike love to engage in outdoor sports and fitness activities. This increase in physical activity can lead to an increased risk of injury." Through his experience working with athletes, both professional and amateur, as well as fitness enthusiasts like CrossFitters and runners, Dr. Domb is available to provide effective tips for an injury-free summer. Dr. Domb is a nationally recognized orthopedic surgeon specializing in sports medicine and arthroscopic surgery of the hip, shoulder and knee. Website: http://www.benjamindombmd.com Contact: Rachel Prude, Rachel.prude@allisonpr.com Summer BBQ Safety Tips Peter Duncanson Director, Disaster Restoration Business Operations ServiceMaster Restore Duncanson is available for interviews on summer BBQ safety tips, including proper charcoal grill safety, how to use a gas grill wisely, and how to practice good grilling habits: "Set your grill up at a safe distance from structures and overhangs, including your main building, shed, garage, trees and other potentially flammable objects. Never use your grill inside, in a tent or under an outdoor awning or carport. Doing so can pose a serious fire hazard and potentially cause carbon monoxide poisoning if you're using a gas grill. Light your gas or charcoal grill using special long-length lighters or long matches to avoid getting burned. Keep all ignition sources out of the reach of children. Never leave an actively burning grill unattended, and let your grill fully cool before you cover or store it. Clean your grill thoroughly and often to reduce flammable buildup inside." Contact: Bristol Whitcher, bwhitcher@conecomm.com Summer Safety Jared Staver Attorney Staver Law Group. P.C. Staver is available to discuss various summer safety topics, including sun glare accidents, motorcycle safety, pool/water safety, heat exhaustion and more. On motorcycle safety: "During the summer months, drivers and motorcyclists should take extra precautions to avoid accidents. Statistics show that more than 50% of motorcycle accidents involve riders with less than five months of riding experience. To minimize the risk of accidents, motorcyclists should always wear protective gear including proper eyewear and helmets. Make sure your bike is properly maintained before taking it out for the first summer ride and keep a toolkit on your bike at all times. Mechanical defects can contribute to road crashes." Staver is a Chicago personal injury attorney and owner of Staver Law Group, P.C. His practice focuses on representing people seeking compensation after being hurt in the Chicago area, whether by a car accident, slip and fall, workplace accident, dog bite, or from an act of medical malpractice. An experienced and dedicated litigator, Jared has recovered tens of millions of dollars in settlements and verdicts for his clients. Bio: https://www.chicagolawyer.com/about-staver-law-group/jared-staver/ Website: https://www.chicagolawyer.com Contact: John Branham, jb@chicagolawyer.com How to Stay Safe on the Job/Keep Employees Safe David Quezada Vice President of Loss Control EMPLOYERS "Working in hot and sunny environments or near heat sources all day can wear employees down. To help employees rest and recharge, encourage them to take regular breaks in the shade or other cool environments. Build break times into employees' schedules to help enforce the practice. Make sure employees know how to recognize the signs of heat-related illness and the immediate steps they need to take to help themselves or their co-workers. In the event of a medical emergency, contact 911 immediately, but also train employees so they can be proactive before professional help arrives. Fostering a safe and comfortable work environment is an important commitment every day of the year, but especially when new risks, such as extreme heat, are introduced." EMPLOYERS is a specialty workers' compensation insurance carrier. Website: www.employers.com Contact: Alexandra Gardell Kreuter, EmployersInsurance@allisonpr.com Managing Medications During the Summer Jon Michaeli EVP of Marketing and Business Development Medisafe Michaeli is available to discuss the importance of managing your medications during the summer months, whether it's during vacations or ensuring that your children are keeping up with their medications while they're at summer camp. Managing medications essentially helps you to manage your conditions, resulting in improved outcomes. Contact: Kendra Lee, medisafe@racepointglobal.com What to Do During a Power Outage Keith Pinkerton Owner Mr. Electric, Huntsville, Ala. Pinkerton is available to discuss weather precautions and backup generators during storm season. He can advise homeowners what to do when there is a power outage and how to ensure electrical safety around the house in general. He is the owner of the Huntsville, Ala., branch of Mr. Electric, a national brand of electrical installation and repair centers. Website: https://mrelectric.com/huntsville Contact: Elise Rose, erose@fishmanpr.com Safety When Completing House Projects J.B. Sassano President Mr. Handyman Sassano is available to discuss safety when completing house projects, such as using power washers, power drills, climbing on ladders for gutter cleaning, etc. He is president of Mr. Handyman, the nation's leading home repair and maintenance franchise. Website: https://www.mrhandyman.com Contact: Elise Rose, erose@fishmanpr.com Injury Trends Darshan Patel, M.D. Chief of Pediatric Emergency Medicine Maria Fareri Children's Hospital Dr. Patel can provide commentary on a wide variety of summer conditions and their recommended treatment, as well as injury trends. As Section Chief, Dr. Patel serves as head of the Pediatric Emergency Department. He and his team are the first line of care for children in needing immediate care after injuries or at the onset of illnesses. Maria Fareri Children's Hospital, a member of the Westchester Medical Center Health Network, is the Level 1 pediatric trauma center for a region with more than 3 million people. In the past, Dr. Patel has been a media resource for summer safety topics, including ATV and water safety, as well as injuries caused by trampolines and fireworks.  He has also contributed to reports regarding dehydration and heat stroke. He has television, radio and print media experience, and is adept at breaking down complex medical topics for families. He is available for media interviews when requests do not interfere with patient care. Contact: Andy LaGuardia, andrew.laguardia@wmchealth.org Water Safety Tips Ann Marie Buerkle Acting Chairman U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission Buerkle is available to discuss the many steps that parents can take to improve safety in and around water. As acting chairman of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), Buerkle offers a unique perspective into the importance of safety in and around water. One of the national public education campaigns the Chairman oversees is the Pool Safely campaign, which is aimed at reducing child drownings and non-fatal submersions, as well as entrapments in public swimming pools and spas. The campaign was launched in 2010 and has a network of over 1,000 partners that are dedicated to promoting and benefitting from the campaign. Website: https://www.poolsafely.gov Contact: Christina Saull: Christina.Saull@finnpartners.gov Following are links to job listings for staff and freelance writers, editors and producers. You can view these and more job listings on our Job Board: https://prnmedia.prnewswire.com/community/jobs/ Following are links to other news and resources we think you might find useful. If you have an item you think other reporters would be interested in and would like us to include in a future alert, please drop us a line. PROFNET is an exclusive service of PR Newswire. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/profnet-experts-available-on-summer-safety-opioid-abuse-stress-more-300460792.html


— Global Urinary Incontinence Products Industry Report offers market overview, segmentation by types, application, countries, key manufactures, cost analysis, industrial chain, sourcing strategy, downstream buyers, marketing strategy analysis, distributors/traders, factors affecting market, forecast and other important information for key insight. Companies profiled in this report are Kimberly-Clark, Sca, Unicharm, Procter & Gamble, First Quality Enterprises, Domtar, Medline, 3m, Covidien, B Braun, Cotton Incorporated, Tranquility, Hengan Group, Coco, Chiaus, Fuburg, Aab Group, Coloplast, Convatec, Flexicare Medical, Hollister, Marlen Manufacturing & Development in terms of Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors, Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017). Split by Product Types, with sales, revenue, price, market share of each type, can be divided into • Urine Absorbents • Urine Accepted Products/ Incontinence Bags • Others Split by applications, this report focuses on sales, market share and growth rate of Urinary Incontinence Products in each application, can be divided into • Hospital • Homecare • Nursing Homes • Others Purchase a copy of this report at: https://www.themarketreports.com/report/buy-now/424287 Table of Content: 1 Urinary Incontinence Products Market Overview 2 Global Urinary Incontinence Products Sales, Revenue (Value) and Market Share by Manufacturers 3 Global Urinary Incontinence Products Sales, Revenue (Value) by Countries, Type and Application (2012-2017) 4 Global Urinary Incontinence Products Manufacturers Profiles/Analysis 5 North America Urinary Incontinence Products Sales, Revenue (Value) by Countries, Type and Application (2012-2017) 6 Latin America Urinary Incontinence Products Sales, Revenue (Value) by Countries, Type and Application (2012-2017) 7 Europe Urinary Incontinence Products Sales, Revenue (Value) by Countries, Type and Application (2012-2017) 8 Asia-Pacific Urinary Incontinence Products Sales, Revenue (Value) by Countries, Type and Application (2012-2017) 9 Middle East and Africa Urinary Incontinence Products Sales, Revenue (Value) by Countries, Type and Application (2012-2017) 10 Urinary Incontinence Products Manufacturing Cost Analysis 11 Industrial Chain, Sourcing Strategy and Downstream Buyers 12 Marketing Strategy Analysis, Distributors/Traders 13 Market Effect Factors Analysis 14 Global Urinary Incontinence Products Market Forecast (2017-2022) 15 Research Findings and Conclusion 16 Appendix Inquire more for more details about this report at: https://www.themarketreports.com/report/ask-your-query/424287 For more information, please visit https://www.themarketreports.com/report/2017-2022-global-top-countries-urinary-incontinence-products-market-report


News Article | July 12, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

"Our country's greatest strength is the diversity of its people. Although we may disagree with each other from time to time, we are bound together by common threads, starting with the cotton blanket used to wrap newborns in U.S. hospitals," says Jill Orsini, advertising director for Cotton Incorporated. The call for unity message continues and gives consumers the chance to show their agreement in two ways: by using The United of America Facebook filter, available from the Cotton Facebook page; and by sharing pictures with #TheUnitedofAmerica of loved ones wrapped in the iconic blanket --- whether six months, six years or twenty-six years ago to show their support that we are more alike than different. The cotton receiving blanket featured in the video and inspiring the Facebook filter, is from Medline, an Illinois-based manufacturer of and distributor of medical supplies. The blanket with the signature stripes wraps one in four newborns in the United States. The video is a visual metaphor conveying that Americans, regardless of gender or color, are born equal, including the cotton blanket that comforts our first moments in the world. 'The United of America' campaign launched on Tuesday, July 4, 2017, with a video distributed across Cotton Incorporated social media channels and lives on TheUnitedOfAmerica.com. Since its launch, the video received more than 300,000 views. The campaign runs through the month of July. Cotton Incorporated, funded by U.S. cotton producers and importers of cotton and cotton textile products, conducts worldwide research and promotion activities to increase the demand for and profitability of cotton. For more information about Cotton Incorporated visit CottonInc.com.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Cotton Incorporated and PurThread Technologies, Inc. announce a collaboration to bring PurThread’s permanently embedded anti-odor solution to cotton knit and woven fabrics. Retail brands and consumers alike continue to seek fabrics that lend performance attributes while maintaining the luxurious look and feel of cotton. Cotton Incorporated has developed cotton-rich fabrics with PurThread that offer a nice hand and uniform colors, all while offering permanent anti-odor benefits. PurThread’s inherent antimicrobial technology incorporates EPA-registered recycled silver salts into staple fiber and filament yarn at the extrusion level. This lends permanent fabric protection from odor-causing bacteria, mold, mildew and fungus, yielding antimicrobial benefits that do not wash away or wear off for the life of the fabric. It also does not change the fabric’s physical characteristics. “Consumers know and love cotton, and they have come to expect performance technologies like odor control in their athletic apparel. The continued growth of the athleisure category creates an ideal opportunity to expand established athletic apparel performance technologies to additional categories, such as denim," explained Mark Messura, Cotton Incorporated Senior Vice President, Global Supply Chain Marketing. "The fabrics created through this collaboration maintain the look and feel of cotton and add long-lasting anti-odor properties. The PurThread technology is effective and does not impact fabric design. We look forward to sharing these developments with the industry because we believe they are the right innovation at the right time.” “We are pleased to have our antimicrobial efficacy validated by such a highly regarded organization,” said Lisa Grimes, CEO of PurThread Technologies. “Blending PurThread with cotton to offer permanent antimicrobial protection offers tangible benefits – apparel can be worn for longer periods of time between washings, helping to reduce water consumption and energy usage. This is an exciting collaboration that should yield some great new performance fabrics across multiple markets.” About Cotton Incorporated Cotton Incorporated, funded by U.S. cotton producers and importers of cotton and cotton textile products, conducts worldwide research and promotion activities to increase the demand for and profitability of cotton. For more information, visit http://www.cottoninc.com. About PurThread Technologies PurThread Technologies, Inc. employs technology to embed a proprietary blend of EPA-registered recycled silver salts into the core of fiber. As a result, PurThread yarns inherently protect fabric from the effects of microbial contamination and reduce odor-causing bacteria, mold, mildew and fungus. Products made with PurThread range from healthcare textiles, such as privacy curtains and scrubs, to freshness products, such as performance athletic wear, socks and gear for emergency first responders. The EPA has not yet reviewed any public health claims for PurThread products. PurThread yarns are 100% Made in the USA. For more information, visit http://www.purthread.com.


News Article | November 14, 2016
Site: www.newsmaker.com.au

MarketStudyReport.com adds “Global Urinary Incontinence Market by Manufacturers, Regions, Type and Application, Forecast to 2021” new report to its research database. The report spread across 111 pages with table and figures in it. Urinary incontinence products, such as pads, are not a cure for urinary incontinence; however, using these pads and other devices to contain urine loss and maintain skin integrity are extremely useful in selected cases. Absorbent products used include underpads, pant liners (shields and guards), adult diapers (briefs), a variety of washable pants, and disposable pad systems, or combinations of these products. Scope of the Report: This report focuses on the Urinary Incontinence in Global market, especially in North America, Europe and Asia-Pacific, South America, Middle East and Africa. This report categorizes the market based on manufacturers, regions, type and application. Market Segment by Manufacturers, this report covers Kimberly-Clark SCA Unicharm Procter & Gamble First Quality Enterprises Domtar Medline 3M Covidien B Braun Cotton Incorporated Tranquility Hengan Group Coco Chiaus Fuburg AAB Group Coloplast ConvaTec Flexicare Medical Hollister Marlen Manufacturing & Development Market Segment by Regions, regional analysis covers North America (USA, Canada and Mexico) Europe (Germany, France, UK, Russia and Italy) Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India and Southeast Asia) South America, Middle East and Africa Market Segment by Type, covers Urine Absorbents Urine Accepted Products/ Incontinence Bags Others Market Segment by Applications, can be divided into Hospital Homecare Nursing Homes Others Browse full table of contents and data tables at https://www.marketstudyreport.com/reports/global-urinary-incontinence-market-by-manufacturers-regions-type-and-application-forecast-to-2021/ There are 13 Chapters to deeply display the global Urinary Incontinence market. Chapter 1, to describe Urinary Incontinence Introduction, product scope, market overview, market opportunities, market risk, market driving force; Chapter 2, to analyze the top manufacturers of Urinary Incontinence, with sales, revenue, and price of Urinary Incontinence, in 2015 and 2016; Chapter 3, to display the competitive situation among the top manufacturers, with sales, revenue and market share in 2015 and 2016; Chapter 4, to show the global market by regions, with sales, revenue and market share of Urinary Incontinence, for each region, from 2011 to 2016; Chapter 5, 6, 7 and 8, to analyze the key regions, with sales, revenue and market share by key countries in these regions; Chapter 9 and 10, to show the market by type and application, with sales market share and growth rate by type, application, from 2011 to 2016; Chapter 11, Urinary Incontinence market forecast, by regions, type and application, with sales and revenue, from 2016 to 2021; Chapter 12 and 13, to describe Urinary Incontinence sales channel, distributors, traders, dealers, appendix and data source. To receive personalized assistance write to us @ [email protected] with the report title in the subject line along with your questions or call us at +1 866-764-2150


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

JACKSON, Tenn. - The Weed Science Society of America (WSSA) awarded the title of Outstanding Paper in Weed Technology to researchers from the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture. Matthew Wiggins, a recent Ph.D. graduate of UT's College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources and Robert Hayes and Larry Steckel, both professors with UT's Department of Plant Sciences, co-authored the paper. "Evaluating Cover Crops and Herbicides for Glyphosate Resistant Palmer Amaranth Control in Cotton" appeared in Weed Technology in April 2016. The research evaluated four cover crops (cereal rye, crimson clover, hairy vetch and winter wheat) plus combinations of one grass and one legume followed by pre-emergence applications of fluometuron or acetochlor. The study showed that combinations of grass and legume cover crops accumulated the most biomass and reduced Palmer amaranth emergence by half compared to non-cover-treated areas. However, by 28 days after application, the cereal rye and wheat cover crops provided the best Palmer amaranth control. Herbicide-resistant weeds are a significant threat to agronomic crop production across the globe. Besides lost yields, Steckel estimates the costs of additional management can run from $35 - $100 per acre, depending on the crop. Integrating cultural practices, like cover crops, in weed management programs has been a central theme in UTIA weed science research for the past decade as scientists search for solutions to herbicide resistance. The Outstanding Paper award was presented February 6, 2017, during WSSA's annual meeting in Tucson, Arizona. "We're proud to honor true innovators who are making a significant mark on weed science through their commitment to research, education and teaching," said Janis McFarland, 2017 annual meeting program chair and incoming president of WSSA. The study was conducted at the West Tennessee AgResearch and Education Center in Jackson, Tennessee, and was partially funded by Cotton Incorporated through the Tennessee Cotton State Support Committee. Through its mission of research, teaching and extension, the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture touches lives and provides Real. Life. Solutions. ag.tennessee.edu


News Article | December 21, 2016
Site: phys.org

In a paper published Dec. 20 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, NC State researchers and colleagues from the Danforth Plant Science Center, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Cotton Incorporated describe how they used genomic and molecular tools to find the location of the DNA sequence that determines major leaf shapes in upland cotton. The researchers also describe how they manipulated the genetic code to alter the shape of a cotton plant's leaves in potentially beneficial ways. This discovery represents a significant step toward developing cotton varieties that produce higher yields at less cost to the farmers, said Vasu Kuraparthy, an associate professor with NC State's Department of Crop and Soil Sciences and the project's principal investigator. Scientists have recognized that cotton plants with leaves that have five deep lobes, like the leaves of the okra plant, offer advantages to farmers over what researchers refer to as "normal" leaves. Dr. Ryan Andres, a postdoctoral researcher who worked in Kuraparthy's lab while he was a graduate student, said the so-called "okra" leaf cottons are less susceptible to boll rot than the stably yielding "normal" leaf cotton varieties. The okra leaves also allow a spray to be more evenly dispersed across a plant and are associated with higher rates of flowering and earlier rates of maturity in cotton, Andres added. To determine if they'd found the DNA sequence that controlled major leaf shapes in cotton, researchers infected okra-leaf plants with a modified virus that silenced the target gene. That led to a temporary production of normal leaves until the plants overcame the experimental virus and reverted to okra leaf shape. Kuraparthy and Andres said they hope that this leaf architecture leads to an ideal cotton cultivar, or ideotype, capable of combining the advantages of the two leaf shapes. "We were able to create our ideotype but only in a transient fashion. One day we want to able to do it in a heritable manner, and the first step in that is finding the gene and proving that this is the gene and these are the polymorphisms in the gene that cause these changes," Kuraparthy said. "This research does that." Explore further: A small piece of DNA with a large effect on leaf shape More information: Modifications to a LATE MERISTEM IDENTITY-1 gene are responsible for the major leaf shapes of Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) doi: doi.org/10.1101/062612


News Article | December 21, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Researchers know that the variation in leaf shapes can mean big differences in a farmer's bottom line. Now, a new discovery gives plant breeders key genetic information they need to develop crop varieties that make the most of these leaf-shape differences. In a paper published Dec. 20 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, NC State researchers and colleagues from the Danforth Plant Science Center, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Cotton Incorporated describe how they used genomic and molecular tools to find the location of the DNA sequence that determines major leaf shapes in upland cotton. The researchers also describe how they manipulated the genetic code to alter the shape of a cotton plant's leaves in potentially beneficial ways. This discovery represents a significant step toward developing cotton varieties that produce higher yields at less cost to the farmers, said Dr. Vasu Kuraparthy, an associate professor with NC State's Department of Crop and Soil Sciences and the project's principal investigator. Scientists have recognized that cotton plants with leaves that have five deep lobes, like the leaves of the okra plant, offer advantages to farmers over what researchers refer to as "normal" leaves. Dr. Ryan Andres, a postdoctoral researcher who worked in Kuraparthy's lab while he was a graduate student, said the so-called "okra" leaf cottons are less susceptible to boll rot than the stably yielding "normal" leaf cotton varieties. The okra leaves also allow a spray to be more evenly dispersed across a plant and are associated with higher rates of flowering and earlier rates of maturity in cotton, Andres added. To determine if they'd found the DNA sequence that controlled major leaf shapes in cotton, researchers infected okra-leaf plants with a modified virus that silenced the target gene. That led to a temporary production of normal leaves until the plants overcame the experimental virus and reverted to okra leaf shape. Kuraparthy and Andres said they hope that this leaf architecture leads to an ideal cotton cultivar, or ideotype, capable of combining the advantages of the two leaf shapes. "We were able to create our ideotype but only in a transient fashion. One day we want to able to do it in a heritable manner, and the first step in that is finding the gene and proving that this is the gene and these are the polymorphisms in the gene that cause these changes," Kuraparthy said. "This research does that." Note to Editors: The study abstract follows. "Modifications to a LATE MERISTEM IDENTITY-1 gene are responsible for the major leaf shapes of Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)" Published: Dec. 20, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America ABSTRACT: Leaf shape varies spectacularly among plants. Leaves are the primary source of photo-assimilate in crop plants and understanding the genetic basis of variation in leaf morphology is critical to improving agricultural productivity. Leaf shape played a unique role in cotton improvement, as breeders have selected for entire and lobed leaf morphs resulting from a single locus, okra (L-D1), which is responsible for the major leaf shapes in cotton. The L-D1 locus is not only of agricultural importance in cotton, but through pioneering chimeric and morphometric studies it has contributed to fundamental knowledge about leaf development. Here we show that an HD-Zip transcription factor homologous to the LATE MERISTEM IDENTITY1 (LMI1) gene of Arabidopsis is the causal gene underlying the L-D1 locus. The classical okra leaf shape allele has a 133-bp tandem duplication in the promoter, correlated with elevated expression, while an 8-bp deletion in the third exon of the presumed wild-type normal allele causes a frame-shifted and truncated coding sequence. Our results indicate that sub-okra is the ancestral leaf shape of tetraploid cotton that gave rise to the okra allele and that normal is a derived mutant allele that came to predominate and define the leaf shape of cultivated cotton. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of the LMI1-like gene in an okra variety was sufficient to induce normal leaf formation. The developmental changes in leaves conferred by this gene are associated with a photosynthetic transcriptomic signature, substantiating its use by breeders to produce a superior cotton ideotype.


Patent
Cotton Incorporated and The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of Agriculture | Date: 2015-07-17

Systems and methods for removing material, e.g., linters, from seeds, e.g., ginned cottonseeds, are provided. The systems and methods involve rotating the seeds in a rotatable drum having a plurality of longitudinal brushes. The centrifugal force created by the rotation of the drum and the plurality of longitudinal brushes urge the seeds against an interior surface of the drum that is lined with a brush insert. In this way, work is performed that removes the material from the exterior of the seeds. The material is removed using reduced pressure and the processed seeds are removed. The system may include a brush insert that is easily removed from the rotatable drum. Other systems and methods are disclosed.


Patent
Cotton Incorporated and The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of Agriculture | Date: 2014-04-23

Systems and methods for removing material, e.g., linters, from seeds, e.g., ginned cottonseeds, are provided. The systems and methods involve rotating the seeds in a rotatable drum having a plurality of longitudinal brushes. The centrifugal force created by the rotation of the drum and the plurality of longitudinal brushes urge the seeds against an interior surface of the drum that is lined with a brush insert. In this way, work is performed that removes the material from the exterior of the seeds. The material is removed using reduced pressure and the processed seeds are removed. The system may include a brush insert that is easily removed from the rotatable drum. Other systems and methods are disclosed.

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