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Patent
CosmosID | Date: 2017-03-22

The present invention belongs to the field of genomics and nucleic acid sequencing. It involves a novel method of sequencing biological material and real-time probabilistic matching of short strings of sequencing information to identify all species present in said biological material. It is related to real-time probabilistic matching of sequence information, and more particular to comparing short strings of a plurality of sequences of single molecule nucleic acids, whether amplified or unamplied, whether chemically synthesized or physically interrogated, as fast as the sequence information is generated and in parallel with continuous sequence information generation or collection.


ROCKVILLE, Md., June 1, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- CosmosID, Inc., a biotechnology company focused on improving life and wellness through unlocking potential of the microbiome, today announced that new findings of research studies employing its highly curated genome database and next-generation...


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Arrowhead Publishers is pleased to announce that a variety of expert panel discussions have been announced for its upcoming 3rd Annual Translational Microbiome Conference. This event, which will take place April 11-13, 2017 in Boston, MA, will unite presenters and attendees from academia, industry, and the government to provide a multi-stakeholder perspective on the latest trends and developments in the microbiome space. For more information, visit: http://www.microbiomeconference.com. The CEO of CosmosID Inc. Manoj Dadlani will lead the panel on bioinformatics tools for clinical applications in metagenomics, as well as challenges to overcome in the complex clinical and regulatory environments. Panelists will also discuss the dire need for robust bioinformatics tools that can address the complex clinical and regulatory environments. Co-founder and CEO of Whole Biome, Dr. Colleen Cultcliffe, will be leading a panel discussion on the microbiome and its growing presence in the media. As new therapeutics are being developed, the microbiome industry must find ways to overcome the hype and unrealistic timelines that can be expected by the general public. Mohan S. Iyer, CBO at Second Genome, will be moderating the panel on pharma companies working in the microbiome industry. He and the panelists will discuss the latest partnerships between the microbiome industry and pharma, and the deals outlook for 2017. The “Strategies and Risks for Developing Comprehensive Patent and Licensing Strategies” panel will be led by Greg Sieczkiewicz, Managing Director at MPM Capital. This panel will analyze the various challenges and opportunities that organizations will experience when developing a patent portfolio in the microbiome therapeutics industry. They will also discuss what is necessary from a licensing perspective in order to create a successful pharma-biotech relationship. Director of Research and Development of Reckitt Benckiser, Joe Rubino, will moderate the panel discussion “Time to Put the Hygiene Hypothesis to Rest?” JP Benya, Vice President Commercial of Assembly Biosciences will lead the panel discussion on commercial challenges and opportunities in the microbiome-based therapeutics industry. By focusing on critical factors to consider when launching a MBT including regulatory considerations, customer expectations, and messaging implications, this panel will provide expert insight into the future of microbiome-based therapeutics. Arrowhead Publishers’ 3rd Annual Translational Microbiome Conference will continue to focus and build on the challenges and hurdles that companies working in the microbiome space will have to recognize and navigate in order to successfully commercialize their products. With a broad focus spanning multiple disease states (oncology, dermatology, inflammatory disorders, among others), attendees will have the opportunity to hear the leading companies discuss integral components of successful businesses. For more information, visit: http://www.microbiomeconference.com/brochure. For more information, please contact: John Waslif: Managing Director Arrowhead Publishers 866-945-0263 ext 700 john.waslif(at)arrowheadpublishers(dot)com


The present invention relates to systems and methods capable of characterizing populations of organisms within a sample. The characterization may utilize probabilistic matching of short strings of sequencing information to identify genomes from a reference genomic database to which the short strings belong. The characterization may include identification of the microbial community of the sample to the species and/or sub-species and/or strain level with their relative concentrations or abundance. In addition, the system and methods may enable rapid identification of organisms including both pathogens and commensals in clinical samples, and the identification may be achieved by a comparison of many (e.g., hundreds to millions) metagenomic fragments, which have been captured from a sample and sequenced, to many (e.g., millions or billions) of archived sequence information of genomes (i.e., reference genomic databases).


The present invention relates to systems and methods for the characterization of biological material within a sample or isolate. The characterization may utilize probabilistic methods that compare sequencing information from fragment reads to sequencing information of reference genomic databases and/or trait-specific database catalogs. The characterization may be of the identities and/or relative concentrations or abundance of one or more organisms contained in the sample or isolate. The identification of the organisms may be to the species and/or sub-species and/or strain level with their relative concentrations or abundance. The characterization may additionally or alternatively be of one or more traits (i.e., characteristics) of the biological material contained in the sample or isolate. The characterization of the one or more traits may be with the relative abundance of the traits.


The present invention relates to systems and methods capable of characterizing populations of organisms within a sample. The characterization may utilize probabilistic matching of short strings of sequencing information to identify genomes from a reference genomic database to which the short strings belong. The characterization may include identification of the microbial community of the sample to the species and/or sub-species and/or strain level with their relative concentrations or abundance. In addition, the system and methods may enable rapid identification of organisms including both pathogens and commensals in clinical samples, and the identification may be achieved by a comparison of many (e.g., hundreds to millions) metagenomic fragments, which have been captured from a sample and sequenced, to many (e.g., millions or billions) of archived sequence information of genomes (i.e., reference genomic databases).


Patent
CosmosID | Date: 2014-05-30

The present invention belongs to the field of genomics and nucleic acid sequencing. It involves a novel method of sequencing biological material and real-time probabilistic matching of short strings of sequencing information to identify all species present in said biological material. It is related to real-time probabilistic matching of sequence information, and more particular to comparing short strings of a plurality of sequences of single molecule nucleic acids, whether amplified or unamplied, whether chemically synthesized or physically interrogated, as fast as the sequence information is generated and in parallel with continuous sequence information generation or collection.


News Article | November 22, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

HILDEN, Germany & AARHUS, Denmark--(BUSINESS WIRE)--QIAGEN and CosmosID, a leading genomic big data company, today announced the launch of a metagenomics analysis plugin for the QIAGEN Microbial Genomics Pro Suite and CLC Genomics Workbench. The launch of the Cosmos ID plugin expands QIAGEN’s industry leading platform for NGS bioinformatics and strengthens its role as a provider of Sample to Insight metagenomics solutions. The CosmosID plugin offers support for shotgun metagenomics and microbio


News Article | August 23, 2016
Site: www.technologyreview.com

Our annual list of 35 innovators under the age of 35 inevitably arouses this objection: “Do you really believe older people aren’t innovative?” Of course they are. We write about the young because we want to introduce you to promising researchers and entrepreneurs. But older people are as capable of new thinking as young ones. Below are seven innovators over the age of 70, still working. 1. Shirley Ann Jackson, 70, is the 18th president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. A theoretical physicist, she was the first African-American woman to be awarded a doctorate from MIT, and she is widely admired for making Rensselaer into a major center of research. She has served on a bewildering number of public committees, including President Obama’s Intelligence Advisory Board, where she is cochair, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, which she chaired from 1995 to 1999. 2. Research conducted and startups founded by the computer scientist Michael Stonebraker, who is 71, led directly to the relational databases used everywhere today. He worked for many years at UC Berkeley and in Silicon Valley; and as an adjunct professor at MIT and an entrepreneur, he continues to cofound a new company every couple of years, commercializing his breakthroughs in database management. In 2014, he received the Turing Award. 3. The philosopher Derek Parfit, born in 1942, published Reasons and Persons in 1984 to immense acclaim. Using thought experiments borrowed from science fiction, including speculations about teleportation, the book exploded ideas about the persistence of identity and our duties to future generations. There followed a 37-year near silence, while a monumental unfinished work was circulated in manuscript amongst philosophers and reading groups. In 2011, Parfit finally published On What Matters. It reconciles rules-based, consequentialist, and contractualist conceptions of morality, which Parfit says are “climbing the same mountain on different sides.” 4. Matthew Carter, 78, is one of the most prolific type designers in history. More than anyone else, Carter is responsible for translating classic type to digital uses. His fonts include Georgia, designed to be legible even on very small or low-­resolution screens and included in the “core fonts for the Web” bundled with Internet Explorer 4.0. His greatest typefaces, including Miller, Verdana, and Walker, are displayed in the permanent collection of MOMA. 5. Donald Knuth, also 78, is a professor emeritus at Stanford University and the author of the influential multivolume The Art of Computer Programming. It was initially conceived as a single book of 12 chapters in 1962, but Knuth retired from teaching in 1990 in order to complete the series, whose Volume 4, Fascicle 6 (on “Satisfiability”), was released in December of last year. 6. The environmental microbiologist Rita Colwell, born in 1934, was the director of the National Science Foundation from 1998 to 2004 and is now a professor at the University of Maryland and Johns Hopkins University, chairman emeritus of Canon U.S. Life Sciences, and CEO of CosmosID, a genomics company using data analysis to identify microörganisms for diagnostics, public health, and drug discovery. In 2006, Colwell was awarded the National Medal of Science. 7. Ruzena Bajcsy is a roboticist who is still actively publishing at the age of 83. Born and educated in Czechoslovakia (where the Nazis killed most of her relatives, orphaning her at 11), she was a professor of electrical engineering at the University of Pennsylvania, led the Computer and Information Science and Engineering Directorate of the National Science Foundation with its $500 million budget, and is today a professor at UC Berkeley, where she is also director emerita of the Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society. Her current research focuses on AI, computational biology, and biosystems. Last year, she cowrote three papers about using Microsoft Kinect to improve the lives of older adults or people with muscular dystrophy.

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