Correctional Health Services

New York City, NY, United States

Correctional Health Services

New York City, NY, United States

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Jordan A.O.,Correctional Health Services | Harriman G.,Correctional Health Services | Teixeira P.A.,Correctional Health Services | Cruzado-Quinones J.,Correctional Health Services | Venters H.,Correctional Health Services
AIDS and Behavior | Year: 2013

New York City (NYC) jails are the epicenter of an epidemic that overwhelmingly affects Black and Hispanic men and offer a significant opportunity for public health intervention. The NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene instituted population based approaches to identify the HIV-infected, initiate discharge planning at jail admission, and facilitate post-release linkages to primary care. Using a caring and supportive 'warm transitions' approach, transitional care services are integral to continuity of care. Since 2010, over three-quarters of known HIV-infected inmates admitted to jails received discharge plans; 74 % of those released were linked to primary care. The EnhanceLink initiative's new Health Liaison, a lynchpin role, facilitated 250 court-led placements in medical alternatives to incarceration. Transitional care coordination programs are critical to facilitate continuity of care for people with chronic health conditions including the HIV-infected returning home from jail and for the public health of the communities to which they return.


MacDonald R.,Health Services of NYC | Parsons A.,Health Care Access and Improvement | Venters H.D.,Correctional Health Services
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved | Year: 2013

Correctional health systems represent some of the largest health systems in the United States, caring for patients with high rates of morbidity and mortality. The poorly understood realm of correctional health care represents a missed opportunity to integrate care for these patients with care provided by community health providers. Three aims are integral to effective correctional health: patient safety, population health, and human rights. Patient safety and population health are well- defined aims in community health care systems and emerging in correctional settings. Dual loyalty and other unique challenges in correctional settings make the human rights aim absolutely essential for promoting correctional health. © Meharry Medical College.


Venters H.,Correctional Health Services
American Journal of Public Health | Year: 2013

Approximately 90 000 inmates are admitted annually to the New York City jail system, many of whom require a high level of medical or mental health services. According to our analysis of deaths in custody from 2001 to 2009, crude death rates have dropped significantly despite the increasing age of the population. Falling HIV-related mortality appears to contribute to this change. Other observations include low rates of suicide across all 9 years and increasing age of the population in recent years.


Ludwig A.,Correctional Health Services | Cohen L.,Correctional Health Services | Parsons A.,Correctional Health Services | Venters H.,Correctional Health Services
American Journal of Public Health | Year: 2012

To characterize injuries occurring in jails, we analyzed injury report forms from the New York City jail system. We abstracted data from 4695 injury report forms representing 3863 patients. Of the injuries reported, 66% were classified as intentional. The 2 leading causes of injuries were inmate-on-inmate aggression (40%) and slips and falls (27%). Injuries place a considerable burden on jail health care systems, and there is a need for more studies on this problem and development of injury prevention programs.


New York City (NYC) jails are the epicenter of an epidemic that overwhelmingly affects Black and Hispanic men and offer a significant opportunity for public health intervention. The NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene instituted population based approaches to identify the HIV-infected, initiate discharge planning at jail admission, and facilitate post-release linkages to primary care. Using a caring and supportive warm transitions approach, transitional care services are integral to continuity of care. Since 2010, over three-quarters of known HIV-infected inmates admitted to jails received discharge plans; 74 % of those released were linked to primary care. The EnhanceLink initiatives new Health Liaison, a lynchpin role, facilitated 250 court-led placements in medical alternatives to incarceration. Transitional care coordination programs are critical to facilitate continuity of care for people with chronic health conditions including the HIV-infected returning home from jail and for the public health of the communities to which they return.


Selling D.,Correctional Health Services | Solimo A.,Correctional Health Services | Lee D.,Correctional Health Services | Horne K.,Correctional Health Services | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Correctional Health Care | Year: 2014

Suicide and nonsuicidal self-injury represent significant causes of morbidity and mortality in jail settings. The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene instituted a database of suicidal and nonsuicidal self-injuries in 2007. Between 2007 and 2011, there were eight deaths by suicide and 2,514 acts of self-injury, with the annual rate of self-injury increasing significantly throughout this time period. The most frequent methods of self-injury were lacerations (816), ligature tied around the neck (569), attempted overdose (501), and swallowed foreign objects (372). This review led to improvements in surveillance as well as improvement of the newly implemented electronic health record. © The Author(s) 2014.


PubMed | Correctional Health Services
Type: Journal Article | Journal: American journal of public health | Year: 2012

To characterize injuries occurring in jails, we analyzed injury report forms from the New York City jail system. We abstracted data from 4695 injury report forms representing 3863 patients. Of the injuries reported, 66% were classified as intentional. The 2 leading causes of injuries were inmate-on-inmate aggression (40%) and slips and falls (27%). Injuries place a considerable burden on jail health care systems, and there is a need for more studies on this problem and development of injury prevention programs.


PubMed | Correctional Health Services
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of correctional health care : the official journal of the National Commission on Correctional Health Care | Year: 2012

Correctional institutions play an important role in identifying HIV-positive patients and initiating and continuing their care. However, the actual medical care provided to patients with HIV in jail is poorly characterized. The New York City jail system cares for approximately 7,500 HIV-positive persons each year, including approximately 125 who are newly identified during testing in jail. Analysis of patient data reveals that only 17% of newly identified HIV-positive patients were started on therapy, with the most common reasons for not initiating being not meeting clinical guidelines or short stay. Among known HIV-positive patients, rates of medication continuation were high. Keys to success in maintaining a high level of care for HIV-positive patients include real-time evaluation of the population, routine feedback to providers, and case conferencing.

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