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News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality and Third Sector Capital Partners have joined with three state and local governments to develop a new big-data infrastructure for evaluating programs that aim to increase economic opportunity. The San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency, the Santa Cruz Human Services Department, and the Washington Department of Early Learning will receive research and development support from Stanford and Third Sector. These government-nonprofit-university partnerships will build linked federal, state, and local administrative data sets for evaluating policy and improving economic outcomes and well-being. The first cohort of state and local agencies will be supported by a grant awarded by the Social Innovation Fund, a federal program of the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS), to the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality and Third Sector Capital Partners. This $1.5 million grant was matched by a $1.5 million contribution from the Ballmer Group. “These communities are showing their commitment to using data to develop programs based on outcomes. By accessing and linking to critical data, these communities will be able to better measure results and improve services. This effort is essential to expanding data-driven social programming resulting in delivering proven support to those individuals most in need,” said Caroline Whistler, CEO of Third Sector Capital Partners. The three awardees are: With new big-data capacity, each agency will be able to measure both short- and long-term effects of their programs. “The Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality is committed to improving the country’s infrastructure for evaluating and developing policy to reduce poverty and expand opportunity. These new partnerships will address key issues related to child and youth development, labor market attachment, and individual well-being. We’re excited to join with these communities to evaluate their economic opportunity programs, to learn what works and what doesn’t, and to build capacity for ongoing innovation,” said Charles Varner, Associate Director of the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality. In addition to evaluation and program design, award recipients will join in thematic learning communities that will span the entire West Coast to provide peer development opportunities and encourage the adoption of outcomes-based, data-driven policy. “The Social Innovation Fund is changing the way the government works with the private sector. We identify and invest in efficient and effective models so that more people can benefit from them,” said Lois Nembhard, Acting Director of the Social Innovation Fund. “This group of sub-recipients exemplify how communities are building innovative, data-driven programs. By supporting this opportunity, the Social Innovation Fund is continuing to support evidence-based public policy and create a pipeline of Pay for Success-ready governments.” THE STANFORD CENTER ON POVERTY AND INEQUALITY, a program of the Institute for Research in the Social Sciences at Stanford University, is a nonpartisan research center dedicated to monitoring trends in poverty and inequality, explaining what’s driving those trends, and developing science-based policy on poverty and inequality. The Center’s mission is to conduct and facilitate research on issues of domestic poverty, mobility, and inequality and to disseminate the results of this research to scholars, policy makers, and the general public. The guiding principle of the Center’s work is that research findings should be evidence-based, the result of rigorous scientific inquiry, and communicated clearly and objectively. For more information, visit inequality.stanford.edu. THIRD SECTOR CAPITAL PARTNERS leads governments, high-performing nonprofits, and private funders in building evidence-based initiatives that address society’s most persistent challenges. As experts in innovative contracting and financing strategies, Third Sector is an architect and builder of the nation’s most promising Pay for Success projects including those in Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, Santa Clara County, California and Salt Lake County, Utah. These projects are rewriting the book on how governments contract for social services: funding programs that work to measurably improve the lives of people most in need while saving taxpayer dollars. A 501(c)(3) nonprofit based in Boston, San Francisco and Washington, DC, Third Sector is supported by its work for governments and service providers as well as philanthropic and government grants. THE SOCIAL INNOVATION FUND (SIF) is a program of the Corporation for National and Community Service, a federal agency that engages millions of Americans in service through its AmeriCorps, Senior Corps, and Volunteer Generation Fund programs, and leads the nation’s volunteer and service efforts. The SIF positions the federal government to be a catalyst for impact—using public and private resources to find and grow community-based nonprofits with evidence of results. The SIF focuses on overcoming challenges confronting low-income Americans in three areas of priority need: economic opportunity, healthy futures, and youth development. To learn more, visit http://www.nationalservice.gov/sif.


News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

"We're truly fortunate to bring Rusty aboard, whose deep experience and thought leadership in the realms of education innovation, government and entrepreneurship will bring immediate value to 2U and our university partners," said Christopher "Chip" Paucek, co-founder and CEO of 2U. "Much of my passion and work has been focused on building and leveraging innovative platforms to transform how we learn and become more connected, thoughtful and productive citizens," said Rusty Greiff, senior vice president and regional general manager at 2U. "I could not be more excited to work with 2U and its dynamic team, higher-ed leaders and university partners to create this impact globally." Most recently, Greiff served as managing director and general partner at 1776, a global innovation incubator and venture fund. Greiff will remain a partner in 1776's Seed Fund and serve as a senior advisor to 1776 on global innovation and edtech initiatives. While at 1776, Greiff expanded 1776's global strategy, oversaw 1776's global education platform of over 100 edtech companies, and lead its innovation work with university presidents and provosts. Greiff also headed 1776's venture investments in leading edtech companies in higher-ed workforce development.  Previously, Greiff was a co-founder, chief strategy and development officer, and board executive at Grockit, which was acquired by Kaplan, Inc. in 2013, as well as Learnist, Inc. a leading curation platform.  Greiff has held senior executive roles at Educate, Inc., and USA Networks, Inc. (now IAC/InterActiveCorp), as well as the Office of the Minority Leader and Democratic Steering & Coordination Committee, U.S. Senate; and the Corporation for National and Community Service during President Clinton's first term. Greiff is a frequent speaker, public contributor and panelist on higher education innovation and entrepreneurship, who serves as a senior advisor or board member to multiple venture funds, national non-profits, academic institutions, foundations, and edtech companies. He is a former Coro Fellow in Leadership, holds a B.A. from Washington University in St. Louis, an MBA from Harvard Business School and has completed coursework at London School of Economics. About 2U, Inc. (NASDAQ: TWOU) 2U partners with great colleges and universities to build what we believe is the world's best digital education. Our platform provides a comprehensive fusion of technology, services and data architecture to transform high-quality and rigorous campus-based universities into the best digital versions of themselves. 2U's No Back Row® approach allows qualified students and working professionals around the world to experience a first-rate university education and successful outcomes. To learn more, visit 2U.com. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/russell-rusty-greiff-joins-2u-as-senior-vice-president-and-regional-general-manager-300447072.html


Stanbridge College Awarded Presidential Recognition for Outstanding Community Service Efforts for the Seventh Consecutive Year Irvine, CA, December 16, 2016 --( “Service and higher education go hand in hand,” said Ms. Wendy Spencer, CEO of the Corporation for National and Community Service. “The President’s Honor Roll annually highlights the role colleges and universities play in solving community problems and placing more students on a lifelong path of civic engagement by recognizing institutions that achieve meaningful, measurable outcomes in the communities they serve." “Congratulations to Stanbridge College, its faculty, and students for its commitment to service, both in and out of the classroom,” Ms. Spencer continued. “Through its work, institutions of higher education are helping improve their local communities and create a new generation of leaders.” President of Stanbridge College, Mr. Yasith Weerasuriya stated, “We are extremely honored and pleased to accept this award from the Corporation for National and Community Service recognizing our service efforts for the seventh year in a row. Our students, staff, and faculty endeavor every year to intensify their efforts to help the impoverished in Orange County and abroad.” Throughout the 2013 – 2014 academic year, Stanbridge College developed and strengthened both new and well maintained, long-term community partnerships with non-profits. Such partners include the Autism Speaks Foundation, the Alzheimer’s Association, Southern California Special Olympics, the Free Pantry Organization, the Downtown Dog Rescue, OC Parks, Second Harvest Food Bank of Orange County, the Illumination Foundation, and Irvine Animal Care Center. Recently, Stanbridge College has expanded its efforts to partner with organizations on several civic engagement projects. These projects include: Occupational Therapy students working with Wounded American Veterans Experience SCUBA (WAVES) Project to help veterans with PTSD, Veterinary Technology students creating a kitten foster program alongside the Forever Home Cat Rescue, Occupational Therapy students tutoring Life College students with learning disabilities, and Physical Therapist Assistant students administering wheelchair assessments for clients of the Goodwill of Orange County Fitness and Technology Center. In the recent academic year, Stanbridge College was honored to receive the 2016 Gold Award for Excellence in Community Service from The California Association of Private Postsecondary Schools (CAPPS) for extending its students quality higher education while simultaneously assisting the local community. To learn more about the programs at Stanbridge College and its degree programs, please visit www.stanbridge.edu. About Stanbridge College Founded in 1996, Stanbridge College offers specialized degrees at the Master, Bachelor, and Associate levels in the fields of Nursing and Allied Health. Stanbridge is based in Irvine, California with an annual enrollment of over 1,300 students. For each year from 2009 through 2015, Stanbridge has been named to the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll, the highest federal recognition a college or university can receive for its commitment to volunteering, service-learning, and civic engagement. In 2016, Stanbridge College was awarded the Gold Award for Excellence in Community Service from The California Association of Private Postsecondary Schools (CAPPS) for offering students quality higher education while simultaneously maintaining efforts to assist the local community. In 2013, Stanbridge College received the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges (ACCSC) Community Service Award for outstanding outreach to the local and global community. Stanbridge College has been selected as a 2014-2015 School of Excellence by the ACCSC, and also received its 2015 Excellence in Student Services Award for creating a comprehensive student services program that enhances student achievement outcomes. Institutional Research & Evaluation, Inc., has named Stanbridge College one of America’s Best Technical Colleges for each year from 2009 through 2016. For more information, please visit www.stanbridge.edu or call (866) 837-3620. Irvine, CA, December 16, 2016 --( PR.com )-- Stanbridge College has been named to the 2015 President's Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll by the Corporation for National and Community Service for the seventh consecutive year. The award is the highest federal affirmation a college or university can receive in recognition of its commitment to service-learning and civic engagement. The acknowledgment underlines Stanbridge College’s extensive efforts to bring positive change to both the local and global communities.“Service and higher education go hand in hand,” said Ms. Wendy Spencer, CEO of the Corporation for National and Community Service. “The President’s Honor Roll annually highlights the role colleges and universities play in solving community problems and placing more students on a lifelong path of civic engagement by recognizing institutions that achieve meaningful, measurable outcomes in the communities they serve."“Congratulations to Stanbridge College, its faculty, and students for its commitment to service, both in and out of the classroom,” Ms. Spencer continued. “Through its work, institutions of higher education are helping improve their local communities and create a new generation of leaders.”President of Stanbridge College, Mr. Yasith Weerasuriya stated, “We are extremely honored and pleased to accept this award from the Corporation for National and Community Service recognizing our service efforts for the seventh year in a row. Our students, staff, and faculty endeavor every year to intensify their efforts to help the impoverished in Orange County and abroad.”Throughout the 2013 – 2014 academic year, Stanbridge College developed and strengthened both new and well maintained, long-term community partnerships with non-profits. Such partners include the Autism Speaks Foundation, the Alzheimer’s Association, Southern California Special Olympics, the Free Pantry Organization, the Downtown Dog Rescue, OC Parks, Second Harvest Food Bank of Orange County, the Illumination Foundation, and Irvine Animal Care Center.Recently, Stanbridge College has expanded its efforts to partner with organizations on several civic engagement projects. These projects include: Occupational Therapy students working with Wounded American Veterans Experience SCUBA (WAVES) Project to help veterans with PTSD, Veterinary Technology students creating a kitten foster program alongside the Forever Home Cat Rescue, Occupational Therapy students tutoring Life College students with learning disabilities, and Physical Therapist Assistant students administering wheelchair assessments for clients of the Goodwill of Orange County Fitness and Technology Center.In the recent academic year, Stanbridge College was honored to receive the 2016 Gold Award for Excellence in Community Service from The California Association of Private Postsecondary Schools (CAPPS) for extending its students quality higher education while simultaneously assisting the local community.To learn more about the programs at Stanbridge College and its degree programs, please visit www.stanbridge.edu.About Stanbridge CollegeFounded in 1996, Stanbridge College offers specialized degrees at the Master, Bachelor, and Associate levels in the fields of Nursing and Allied Health. Stanbridge is based in Irvine, California with an annual enrollment of over 1,300 students.For each year from 2009 through 2015, Stanbridge has been named to the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll, the highest federal recognition a college or university can receive for its commitment to volunteering, service-learning, and civic engagement. In 2016, Stanbridge College was awarded the Gold Award for Excellence in Community Service from The California Association of Private Postsecondary Schools (CAPPS) for offering students quality higher education while simultaneously maintaining efforts to assist the local community. In 2013, Stanbridge College received the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges (ACCSC) Community Service Award for outstanding outreach to the local and global community. Stanbridge College has been selected as a 2014-2015 School of Excellence by the ACCSC, and also received its 2015 Excellence in Student Services Award for creating a comprehensive student services program that enhances student achievement outcomes. Institutional Research & Evaluation, Inc., has named Stanbridge College one of America’s Best Technical Colleges for each year from 2009 through 2016.For more information, please visit www.stanbridge.edu or call (866) 837-3620. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Stanbridge College


News Article | January 30, 2016
Site: www.fastcompany.com

In his final State Of The Union address earlier this month, President Obama called for providing hands-on computer science classes for all students to make them "job ready on day one." Today, he is unveiling how he plans to do that with his upcoming budget. The President’s Computer Science for All Initiative seeks to provide $4 billion in funding for states and an additional $100 million directly to school districts in a push to provide access to computer science training in K-12 public schools. The money would go toward things like training teachers, providing instructional materials, and getting kids involved in computer science early in elementary and middle school. In addition, starting this year, a $135 million investment from the National Science Foundation and the Corporation for National and Community Service will go toward training teachers in computer science. In a call with reporters, U.S. chief technology officer Megan Smith said many parents already want to give their children access to computer science classes, but the failing lies in the schools themselves. Only about a quarter of all K-12 schools in the U.S. offer computer science learning opportunities, and in 22 states, computer science doesn’t count toward a high school diploma. Smith called the President's plan "an ambitious, all-hands-on-deck effort to get every student in America an early start for the skills they need to be part of the new economy." Before states could access any of the $4 billion, they would need to submit five-year plans for how the money would be used. The $100 million would go toward competitive grants for school districts leading the way to expand their computer science efforts. Acting education secretary John King said the new initiative is a call to action. Coinciding with the announcement, a handful of organizations, including Google and Microsoft, are launching campaigns to expand computer science investment and training. "Today is just the beginning," King said. "If we all do our part, we can create a movement that gets students ready for the future and gives them a voice in shaping that future."


News Article | January 30, 2016
Site: phys.org

"In the new economy, computer science isn't an optional skill. It's a basic skill, right along with the three R's," Obama said in his weekly radio and Internet address. Obama said only about one-quarter of K-12 schools offer computer science instruction, but that most parents want their children to develop analytical and coding skills. "Today's auto mechanics aren't just sliding under cars to change the oil. They're working on machines that run on as many as 100 million lines of code," Obama said. "That's 100 times more than the Space Shuttle. Nurses are analyzing data and managing electronic health records. Machinists are writing computer programs." The federal budget proposal for 2017 that Obama plans to send Congress on Feb. 9 will seek $4 billion for grants to states and $100 million for competitive grants for school districts over the next three years to teach computer science in elementary, middle and high schools, administration officials said. Separately, the National Science Foundation and the Corporation for National and Community Service this year will start spending $135 million to train teachers over five years. Obama said also wants governors, mayors, business leaders and tech entrepreneurs to become advocates for more widespread computer science education. Brad Smith, president of Microsoft, said computer science education is an "economic and social imperative for the next generation of American students." Smith, who spoke on a media call arranged by the White House, said that up to a million U.S. technology jobs could be left unfilled by the end of the decade. Meanwhile, countries as large as China and as small as Estonia are expanding computer science education, Smith said, but in the U.S. "we're moving, frankly, just more slowly than we need." Explore further: New Obama plan to help math, science teacher prep


News Article | February 1, 2016
Site: www.scientificcomputing.com

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama said January 30, 2016, he will ask Congress for billions of dollars to help students learn computer science skills and prepare for jobs in a changing economy. "In the new economy, computer science isn't an optional skill. It's a basic skill," Obama said in his weekly radio and Internet address. Obama said only about one-quarter of K-12 schools offer computer science instruction, but that most parents want their children to develop analytical and coding skills. "Today's auto mechanics aren't just sliding under cars to change the oil. They're working on machines that run on as many as 100 million lines of code," Obama said. "That's 100 times more than the Space Shuttle. Nurses are analyzing data and managing electronic health records. Machinists are writing computer programs." The federal budget proposal for 2017 that Obama plans to send Congress on February 9 will seek $4 billion for grants to states and $100 million for competitive grants for school districts over the next three years to teach computer science in elementary, middle and high schools, administration officials said. Separately, the National Science Foundation and the Corporation for National and Community Service this year will start spending $135 million to train teachers over five years. Obama also wants governors, mayors, business leaders and tech entrepreneurs to become advocates for more widespread computer science education. Brad Smith, president of Microsoft, said computer science education is an "economic and social imperative for the next generation of American students." Smith, who spoke on a media call arranged by the White House, said that up to a million U.S. technology jobs could be left unfilled by the end of the decade. Meanwhile, countries as large as China and as small as Estonia are expanding computer science education, Smith said, but in the U.S. "we're moving, frankly, just more slowly than we need." Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


News Article | January 30, 2016
Site: boingboing.net

In his weekly address, President Barack Obama this week pledged $4 billion in federal funding for computer science education in schools throughout the nation. You can view video or listen to audio here. From the White House announcement: [Obama] noted that our economy is rapidly shifting, and that educators and business leaders are increasingly recognizing that CS is a “new basic” skill necessary for economic opportunity. The President referenced his Computer Science for All Initiative, which provides $4 billion in funding for states and $100 million directly for districts in his upcoming budget; and invests more than $135 million beginning this year by the National Science Foundation and the Corporation for National and Community Service to support and train CS teachers. The President called on even more Governors, Mayors, education leaders, CEOs, philanthropists, creative media and technology professionals, and others to get involved in the efforts. Here is the full text of the President's announcement: Hi everybody. As I said in my State of the Union address, we live in a time of extraordinary change – change that’s affecting the way we live and the way we work. New technology replaces any job where work can be automated. Workers need more skills to get ahead. These changes aren’t new, and they’re only going to accelerate. So the question we have to ask ourselves is, “How can we make sure everyone has a fair shot at success in this new economy?” The answer to that question starts with education. That’s why my Administration has encouraged states to raise standards. We’ve cut the digital divide in our classrooms in half. We’ve worked with Congress to pass a bipartisan bill to set the expectation that every student should graduate from high school ready for college and a good job. And thanks to the hard work of students, teachers, and parents across the country, our high school graduation rate is at an all-time high. Now we have to make sure all our kids are equipped for the jobs of the future – which means not just being able to work with computers, but developing the analytical and coding skills to power our innovation economy. Today’s auto mechanics aren’t just sliding under cars to change the oil; they’re working on machines that run on as many as 100 million lines of code. That’s 100 times more than the Space Shuttle. Nurses are analyzing data and managing electronic health records. Machinists are writing computer programs. And workers of all kinds need to be able to figure out how to break a big problem into smaller pieces and identify the right steps to solve it. In the new economy, computer science isn’t an optional skill – it’s a basic skill, right along with the three “Rs.” Nine out of ten parents want it taught at their children’s schools. Yet right now, only about a quarter of our K through 12 schools offer computer science. Twenty-two states don’t even allow it to count toward a diploma. So I’ve got a plan to help make sure all our kids get an opportunity to learn computer science, especially girls and minorities. It’s called Computer Science For All. And it means just what it says – giving every student in America an early start at learning the skills they’ll need to get ahead in the new economy. First, I’m asking Congress to provide funding over the next three years so that our elementary, middle, and high schools can provide opportunities to learn computer science for all students. Second, starting this year, we’re leveraging existing resources at the National Science Foundation and the Corporation for National and Community Service to train more great teachers for these courses. And third, I’ll be pulling together governors, mayors, business leaders, and tech entrepreneurs to join the growing bipartisan movement around this cause. Americans of all kinds – from the Spanish teacher in Queens who added programming to her classes to the young woman in New Orleans who worked with her Police Chief to learn code and share more data with the community – are getting involved to help young people learn these skills. And just today, states like Delaware and Hawaii, companies like Google and SalesForce, and organizations like Code.org have made commitments to help more of our kids learn these skills. That’s what this is all about – each of us doing our part to make sure all our young people can compete in a high-tech, global economy. They’re the ones who will make sure America keeps growing, keeps innovating, and keeps leading the world in the years ahead. And they’re the reason I’ve never been more confident about our future. Thanks everybody, and have a great weekend.


News Article | December 15, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

WASHINGTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Bread for the World congratulates Eleanor Crook and her late husband, Ambassador William H. Crook, on receiving the President’s Volunteer Service Award (PVSA) for Lifetime Achievement. The country’s highest award for volunteerism will be presented to Mrs. Crook today at the LBJ Presidential Library in Austin, Texas. “Texas, the United States, and the world are much better off because of the work and philanthropy of William and Eleanor Crook,” said Rev. David Beckmann, president of Bread for the World. Eleanor Crook has been a long-time leader of Bread for the World. Her philanthropy and advocacy have strengthened Bread for the World for more than four decades, and she served on Bread for the World’s board for many years. She is currently working with family members to make her foundation an effective force against world hunger and malnutrition for decades to come. Her family’s grocery company, H-E-B, donates 5 percent of its pre-tax profits to charities, mainly food banks and other organizations that help hungry people. William Crook became national director of the VISTA program 50 years ago. He was part of the team that launched the War on Poverty during the administration of President Lyndon Baines Johnson. William Crook then served as U.S. ambassador to Australia. He remained active in civic affairs throughout his life. He volunteered in Ethiopia during the famine of 1985 and, in the process, caught a disease that eventually led to his death. AmeriCorps VISTA Director Max Finberg is presenting the PVSA for Lifetime Achievement to William and Eleanor Crook. The PVSA, an initiative of the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS), honors individuals for their exemplary volunteer service during a 12-month period or over the course of a lifetime. “Bread for the World is honored to have worked with Eleanor and her family over many years,” Beckmann added. “William and Eleanor Crook are indeed worthy of presidential recognition for their lifetime of commitment to overcoming hunger and poverty.” Bread for the World (www.bread.org) is a collective Christian voice urging our nation’s decision makers to end hunger at home and abroad.


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

WASHINGTON, Feb. 24, 2017 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- As part of the Social Innovation Fund (SIF) week, the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS), the federal agency for volunteering and service, celebrated a major milestone for the SIF. Since the program's inception in...


Lee S.J.,University of San Francisco | Steinman M.A.,University of San Francisco | Tan E.J.,Corporation for National and Community Service
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society | Year: 2011

Objective: To evaluate how accounting for driving status altered the relationship between volunteering and mortality in U.S. retirees. Design: Observational prospective cohort. Setting: Nationally representative sample from the Health and Retirement Study in 2000 and 2002 followed to 2006. Participants: Retirees aged 65 and older (N=6,408). Measurements: Participants self-reported their volunteering, driving status, age, sex, race or ethnicity, presence of chronic conditions, geriatric syndromes, socioeconomic factors, functional limitations, and psychosocial factors. Death by December 31, 2006, was the outcome. Results: For drivers, mortality in volunteers (9%) and nonvolunteers (12%) was similar; for limited or non-drivers, mortality for volunteers (15%) was markedly lower than for nonvolunteers (32%). Adjusted results showed that, for drivers, the volunteering-mortality odds ratio (OR) was 0.90 (95% confidence interval (CI)=0.66-1.22), whereas for limited or nondrivers, the OR was 0.62 (95% CI=0.49-0.78) (interaction P=.05). The effect of driving status was greater for rural participants, with greater differences between rural drivers and rural limited or nondrivers (interaction P=.02) and between urban drivers and urban limited or nondrivers (interaction P=.81). Conclusion: The influence of volunteering in decreasing mortality seems to be stronger in rural retirees who are limited or nondrivers. This may be because rural or nondriving retirees are more likely to be socially isolated and thus receive more benefit from the greater social integration from volunteering. © 2011 The American Geriatrics Society.

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