Corporation for National and Community Service

Washington, DC, United States

Corporation for National and Community Service

Washington, DC, United States
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News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

The National Association of Free and Charitable Clinics (NAFC), whose mission is to ensure that the medically underserved have access to affordable quality health care, believes that President Trump’s fiscal year 2018 budget proposal does not put the country on a path towards building a healthy America.  The budget proposal, entitled “A New Foundation for American Greatness,” seeks $1.5 trillion in nondefense discretionary cuts and $1.4 trillion in Medicaid cuts over the course of a decade. Given the President’s budget dramatically cuts billions of dollars in funding to Medicaid, $274 billion to anti-poverty programs, funding for cancer research, heart health, immunization programs, health professional programs, nursing training programs and rural health care, as well as provides limited funding for opioid treatment programs, repeals the Affordable Care Act, and eliminates the Corporation for National and Community Service, it is apparent that the budget as released does not align with the NAFC’s organizational beliefs with respect to health care reform. “We urge Members of Congress to work across the aisle to ensure that important spending decisions put people over politics,” said Nicole Lamoureux, NAFC CEO. “It is our expectation that policy makers understand that people should not have to make the hard choice between putting food on the table and paying for their medication nor should they be expected to rely on emergency rooms as their primary care doctor’s office. People should not have to declare bankruptcy to pay for their medical bills and/or insurance premiums.” The NAFC remains ready to work with lawmakers to address the needs of the medically underserved throughout the country and to ensure that health care becomes more affordable and accessible for all Americans. The National Association of Free & Charitable Clinics (NAFC) is the only nonprofit 501c(3) organization whose mission is solely focused on the issues and needs of the medically underserved throughout the nation and the more than 1,200 Free and Charitable Clinics that serve them.  Founded in 2001 and headquartered near Washington, D.C., the NAFC is working to ensure that the medically underserved have access to affordable quality health care and strives to be a national voice promoting quality health care for all.  The organization believes that access to health care should be a right, not a privilege, and it values volunteerism, community ownership, service and collaboration. For more information about the NAFC, please visit www.nafcclinics.org. Follow the NAFC on Twitter at https://twitter.com/NAFClinics and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/NAFCClinics. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/f191be51-5e1c-46dd-95f6-dc5fe3d42aea


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

The National Association of Free and Charitable Clinics (NAFC), whose mission is to ensure that the medically underserved have access to affordable quality health care, believes that President Trump’s fiscal year 2018 budget proposal does not put the country on a path towards building a healthy America.  The budget proposal, entitled “A New Foundation for American Greatness,” seeks $1.5 trillion in nondefense discretionary cuts and $1.4 trillion in Medicaid cuts over the course of a decade. Given the President’s budget dramatically cuts billions of dollars in funding to Medicaid, $274 billion to anti-poverty programs, funding for cancer research, heart health, immunization programs, health professional programs, nursing training programs and rural health care, as well as provides limited funding for opioid treatment programs, repeals the Affordable Care Act, and eliminates the Corporation for National and Community Service, it is apparent that the budget as released does not align with the NAFC’s organizational beliefs with respect to health care reform. “We urge Members of Congress to work across the aisle to ensure that important spending decisions put people over politics,” said Nicole Lamoureux, NAFC CEO. “It is our expectation that policy makers understand that people should not have to make the hard choice between putting food on the table and paying for their medication nor should they be expected to rely on emergency rooms as their primary care doctor’s office. People should not have to declare bankruptcy to pay for their medical bills and/or insurance premiums.” The NAFC remains ready to work with lawmakers to address the needs of the medically underserved throughout the country and to ensure that health care becomes more affordable and accessible for all Americans. The National Association of Free & Charitable Clinics (NAFC) is the only nonprofit 501c(3) organization whose mission is solely focused on the issues and needs of the medically underserved throughout the nation and the more than 1,200 Free and Charitable Clinics that serve them.  Founded in 2001 and headquartered near Washington, D.C., the NAFC is working to ensure that the medically underserved have access to affordable quality health care and strives to be a national voice promoting quality health care for all.  The organization believes that access to health care should be a right, not a privilege, and it values volunteerism, community ownership, service and collaboration. For more information about the NAFC, please visit www.nafcclinics.org. Follow the NAFC on Twitter at https://twitter.com/NAFClinics and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/NAFCClinics. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/f191be51-5e1c-46dd-95f6-dc5fe3d42aea


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The 2017 Greater Seattle Civic Health Index is scheduled for public release May 23 by Seattle CityClub. In collaboration with the National Conference on Citizenship (NCoC), the 2017 report ranks 51 American cities across 26 categories measuring civic engagement and the health of their democracies. Started in 2006 by the NCoC, the Civic Health Index (CHI) examines how Americans connect with each other and their communities by surveying the levels of volunteerism, voting, philanthropy, neighbor-to-neighbor connectivity, political expression and religious affiliation amongst residents. The Civic Health Index uses census data provided to the NCoC from the Corporation for National and Community Service. Of the 51 cities studied in 2017 Greater Seattle Civic Health Index, Seattle ranked in the top 10 in 19 of the 26 categories, including 1st in charitable donations over $25, 1st in group participation and 2nd in product boycotting. Seattle’s reputation for being a difficult city to make new friends in—commonly referred to as the “Seattle Freeze”—also improved. When it came to residents doing favors for their neighbors, Seattle improved from 37th in 2014 to 6th in 2017 among the 51 cities studied. The 2017 Greater Civic Health Index also found there are significant disparities in citizen engagement due to lack of access to leaders, civic skills and knowledge of democratic power structures. Greater Seattle residents without a high school diploma are nine times less likely to attend public meetings than residents with a college degree, and Latino Greater Seattle residents are three times less likely to attend public meetings than their White/Caucasian counterparts. According to NCoC research, communities with strong indicators of civic health as measured by the Civic Health Index have higher employment rates, stronger schools, better physical health, and more responsive governments. “We commend Seattle CityClub for its leadership and its work designed to strengthen civic health in Seattle,” said Sally Prouty, Interim CEO of NCoC. The 2017 Civic Health Index will be available May 23 at SeattleCityClub.org. A preview of the 2017 Civic Health Index will be provided to participants at FullConTech, a cross-sector collaboration conference at Seattle City Hall organized by Washington Technology Industry Association (WTIA) on May 22. FullConTech participants will utilize the 2017 Greater Civic Health Index as a tool to inform the direction of their conversations and solutions around civic health. The 2017 Civic Health Index is sponsored by Premera Blue Cross, Boeing, Microsoft, Seattle Foundation, Women’s Funding Alliance, Providence Health and Services and Community Attributes Inc. If you are interested in Seattle CityClub speaking about the 2017 Civic Health Index at your organization or event, please contact Diane Douglas, Seattle CityClub Executive Director at ddouglas(at)SeattleCityClub(dot)org or 206.682.7395. About Seattle CityClub Seattle CityClub is a nonpartisan, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization improving the civic health of the Puget Sound region by informing residents, engaging community leaders and providing programs that bridge politics, professions, cultures and socioeconomic backgrounds. About the National Conference on Citizenship The National Conference on Citizenship (NCoC) is dedicated to strengthening civic life in America. We pursue our mission through a nationwide network of partners involved in a cutting-edge civic health initiative, our cross-sector conferences and engagement with a broad spectrum of individuals and organizations interested in utilizing civic engagement principles and practices to enhance their work. Connecting people for the purpose of strengthening civic life is our goal. At the core of our joint efforts is the belief that every person has the ability to help their community and country thrive.


The organizations came together to develop the Code Corps program using computer science expertise and curriculum from Google, AmeriCorps VISTA members from CNCS and a positive after-school learning environment through local Boys & Girls Clubs. The resulting Code Corps program is designed to inspire and train the next generation of computer scientists and to increase access to computer science education across the United States. Congressman Ro Khanna visited the Boys & Girls Clubs of Silicon Valley to experience the Code Corps Classroom firsthand and participate in a roundtable discussion about the importance of computer science education and national service. CNCS, the federal agency that administers AmeriCorps VISTA and other national service programs, provides Americans opportunities to serve their country through innovative, locally-led solutions that tackle tough challenges, such as expanding access to high-quality STEM education in a time of tight budget constraints. Boys & Girls Clubs of Silicon Valley is situated in the heart of computer science innovation, and it is also alma mater to the 2017 National Youth of the Year, Jocelyn Woods. Jocelyn learned computer coding skills at the Club, which helped her secure internships and even led her to code a photo-sharing app. "As the leading youth advocacy organization, we know that private and public partnerships help to advance our goal to help today's youth achieve great futures," said Jim Clark, president & CEO of Boys & Girls Clubs of America. "Our relationship with Google and CNCS is a wonderful example of the possibilities that come to life when likeminded organizations share their complementary skillsets and offerings. After two very successful years of Code Corps, we are looking forward to empowering even more kids and teens with computer science education, an important competency for 21st century jobs." The AmeriCorps VISTA Code Corps program recruits and trains a group of AmeriCorps VISTA members to facilitate Google's CS First curriculum and other technology experiences for Boys & Girls Club members. The CS First curriculum from Google aims to make computer science accessible and inspiring. The lessons draw upon relatable topics from music to politics, demonstrating that computer science can tap into students' interests. About Boys & Girls Clubs of America For more than 150 years, Boys & Girls Clubs of America (BGCA.org) has enabled young people most in need to achieve great futures as productive, caring, responsible citizens. Today, more than 4,300 Clubs serve nearly 4 million young people through Club membership and community outreach. Clubs are located in cities, towns, public housing and on Native lands throughout the country, and serve military families in BGCA-affiliated Youth Centers on U.S. military installations worldwide. They provide a safe place, caring adult mentors, fun and friendship, and high-impact youth development programs on a daily basis during critical non-school hours. Club programs promote academic success, good character and citizenship, and healthy lifestyles. In a Harris Survey of alumni, 54 percent said the Club saved their lives. National headquarters are located in Atlanta. Learn more at Facebook and Twitter. About the Corporation for National and Community Service The Corporation for National and Community Service is a federal agency that engages millions of Americans in service through AmeriCorps and Senior Corps and leads volunteer initiatives for the nation. For more information, visit NationalService.gov. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/boys--girls-clubs-of-america-with-google-and-americorps-teaches-10000-kids-to-code-300454678.html


-- Outstanding Youth for Human Rights International volunteers and national advocates were honored with Presidential Volunteer Service Awards in a Capitol Hill ceremony marking the finale of Youth for Human Rights International's 14annual World Education Tour.Ambassador Don Bliss, President of the United Nations Association of the United States of America, National Capital Area Chapter, acknowledged President and Founder of Youth for Human Rights International (YHRI), Dr. Mary Shuttleworth, for her tireless efforts to educate youth around the world on their basic human rights for the last 16 years and presented her with a Presidential Volunteer Service lifetime achievement award.A representative from Congresswoman Ann Wagner's office presented Founder and Executive Director of the Foundation for a Slavery Free World, actor Marisol Nichols, with a Presidential Volunteer Service Award to honor her activity as a passionate advocate in the fight against child trafficking. Nichols () was the keynote speaker for the event, capturing the attention of audience members with gritty stories of her undercover work highlighting less well known aspects of the child prostitution network, making it clear that more needs to be done about this pressing issue.A representative from Congressman Brad Sherman's Office also presented a Presidential Volunteer Service Award to two of their constituents for their human rights work.Members of the diplomatic community, congressional office representatives, dignitaries and humanitarians were on hand for the presentationsErica Rodgers, the Director of the Youth for Human Rights Washington DC Chapter, was the master of ceremonies for the event.Recipients of the 2017 Presidential Volunteer Service Awards included Bob and Irina Kaye of California; Emma Ashton of Florida; the Washington DC Youth for Human Rights Chapter; the Delphian School Youth for Human Rights Chapter, of Oregon; and actor Marisol Nichols, of California.  These individuals and groups were each acknowledged for their work promoting and educating on human rights, and shared their stories of inspiration.The event was co-hosted by Youth for Human Rights and the Church of Scientology National Affairs Office."Education is vitally important, especially in the arena of human rights.  The Universal Declaration of Human Rights was written, agreed upon and meant to be disseminated in all areas of society.  Broad human rights awareness can change the world. Lack thereof is one of the main factors for where we are today," Beth Akiyama said.  Akiyama is the Executive Director of the Church of Scientology National Affairs Office, a partner in the event.The President's Volunteer Service Award was started by the President's Council on Service and Civic Participation in 2003 as a way to thank and honor Americans who, by example, inspired others to engage in volunteer service. The Council is no longer, but the program continues as an initiative of the Corporation for National and Community Service and is administered by Points of Light. The Gold PVSA represents a minimum of 250 hours of public service in a year[1]outh for Human Rights International (YHRI) is a nonprofit organization founded in 2001 by Dr. Mary Shuttleworth, an educator born and raised in apartheid South Africa, where she witnessed firsthand the devastating effects of discrimination and the lack of basic human rights. The purpose of YHRI is to teach youth about human rights, specifically the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and inspire them to become advocates for tolerance and peace. YHRI accomplishes this through simple yet empowering, high-quality human rights education materials for youth, teachers and officials in more than 20 languages.The Church of Scientology engages in collaborative efforts with government agencies and nongovernmental organizations to bring about broad-scale awareness and implementation of the 1948 United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Central to Scientology beliefs is a conviction that all humankind is entitled to inalienable rights. Inspired by Mr. Hubbard's words that "Human rights must be made a fact, not an idealistic dream," Scientologists support what has become one of the world's largest nongovernmental human rights education initiative.1. http://www.pointsoflight.org/ programs/recognition/ preside...


Ariana, a junior at Westhampton Beach High School, has raised over $100,000 to provide more than 1,000 new backpacks filled with school supplies for local elementary students through an organization she founded in 2012 called "Backpacks for Fellow Students." "As a 12-year-old I never really understood how a family's economic situation would affect their child's ability to start off the school year prepared and ready to learn," Ariana said. But one day while at the checkout stand buying her own school supplies, she was astonished to see how much the total bill was. The thought occurred to her that there were students in her community whose families couldn't afford to spend that much. She wanted to help. To buy her backpacks and school supplies, Ariana has organized numerous fundraising events, including a "polar bear plunge," 5K races, movie nights, bake sales and an annual appeal. She publicized her events by writing press releases, arranging media interviews and using social media. In addition, Ariana spends time writing appeal letters, applying for grants, soliciting sponsors, recruiting volunteers, ordering supplies, and packing and distributing her backpacks to children whose family incomes qualify them to receive free or reduced-price school lunches. "My hope is to create a level playing field in the classroom, no matter what the socioeconomic status is, and maximize a child's opportunity for educational success," Ariana said. Victoria, an eighth-grader at Robert Moses Middle School, has shared her love of animals with hundreds of thousands of people through oral presentations, homemade videos and articles in online and print publications. When Victoria was little, her grandfather Michael introduced her to pigeons and chickens. "Since then, I've always been interested in animals and in helping to teach others about them," she said. She began by bringing her chickens and pigeons to school one day and making a presentation about them to the entire fifth grade. Since then, she has educated people about birds and other animals through talks at schools, libraries, nature and senior centers, and other venues in New York and other states. She also has created 22 educational videos for her own YouTube channel called "Victoria's Amazing World," many of which feature interviews with celebrities. In addition, Victoria writes articles for two online and print papers. "It requires a lot of work, but I've been able to reach and educate nearly a million people," conveying important information about animal protection, adoption, and rehabilitation, she said. Victoria's efforts were recently recognized when she was invited to speak at her state capital on Animal Advocacy Day. The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards is a national youth recognition program sponsored by Prudential Financial in partnership with the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP). "These honorees have done exemplary work to contribute to the health and vitality of their communities, and we look forward to seeing the great things they achieve in the future," said John Strangfeld, chairman and CEO of Prudential Financial, Inc. "Congratulations to each of these extraordinary young volunteers." "It's a privilege to celebrate these students not only for outstanding volunteer service, but for the example they've set for their peers," said Jayne Ellspermann, president of NASSP. "These honorees prove that one person truly can make a difference." In addition to Ariana, these are the other 2017 National Honorees: Amal Bhatnagar, 18, of Duluth, Ga., a senior at Northview High School, created a student organization that has provided more than a thousand first-aid kits to people in the U.S. and overseas who lack access to basic healthcare. Riley Callen, 14, of Pawlet, Vt., an eighth-grader at Dorset Elementary School, founded an annual "hike-a-thon" in the hills of Vermont that has raised more than $250,000 to help find a cure for brain tumors, like the ones that have affected her since she was 8 years old. Sarah (Katie) Eder, 17, of Shorewood, Wis., a junior at Shorewood High School, developed a creative writing workshop for children in need that is now being taught by 120 teens in seven states and five other countries. Bradley Ferguson, 16, of Northfield, N.J., a sophomore at Mainland Regional High School, started a service-learning club that over the past three years has supported veterans and people in need by refurbishing an American Legion post, collecting food for a community food bank, making lunches for homeless people, and growing fresh produce at several community gardens. Harmonie Frederick, 11, of Columbia, S.C., a fifth-grader at Polo Road Elementary School, sold lemonade to raise money and awareness to fight cancer, conducted a coat drive to keep those less fortunate warm in the winter, and volunteers at a local nursing home. Lorelei McIntyre-Brewer, 11, of Duncannon, Pa., a sixth-grader at The Cove School, built a volunteer network that has provided more than 12,000 special pillows for children around the world undergoing heart surgery. Kelsey Norris, 13, of Bonaire, Ga., a sixth-grader at Bonaire Middle School, overcame a challenging start in life to provide more than 1,000 volunteer hours and raise more than $20,000 for a wide variety of causes aiding children and others in difficult situations. Kenan Pala, 13, of San Diego, Calif., a seventh-grader at Francis Parker Middle School, launched an initiative to benefit homeless people by raising money for local shelters, coordinating meals each quarter at shelter kitchens, and organizing a record-setting cereal donation event. Meghana Reddy, 18, of La Mesa, Calif., a senior at Francis Parker School in San Diego, uses 3D printing technology to produce artificial hands for children and adults in several countries who cannot afford commercial prostheses. The distinguished selection committee that chose the National Honorees was chaired by Strangfeld and included Ellspermann of NASSP; Andrea Bastiani Archibald, chief girl expert for Girl Scouts of the USA; Kristofer Bolz with the national headquarters volunteer services team at the American Red Cross; Tracy Hoover, president of Points of Light; Peggy McLeod, deputy vice president of education and workforce development at the National Council of La Raza; Frederick J. Riley, national director of urban and youth development at YMCA of the USA; Linda Shiller, at-large member on the National PTA Board of Directors; Rhonda Taylor, acting deputy director of strategic communications and director of partnerships and program engagement for the Corporation for National and Community Service; Dru Tomlin, director of middle level services for the Association for Middle Level Education; and two 2016 National Honorees: Connor Archer, a freshman at Husson University in Bangor, Maine, and Alisha Zhao, a senior at Lincoln High School in Portland, Ore. Youth volunteers in grades 5-12 were invited to apply for 2017 Prudential Spirit of Community Awards last fall through schools, Girl Scout councils, county 4-H organizations, American Red Cross chapters, YMCAs and affiliates of the HandsOn Network. The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards program was created in 1995 to identify and recognize young people for outstanding volunteer service – and, in so doing, inspire others to volunteer, too. In the past 22 years, the program has honored more than 120,000 young volunteers at the local, state and national level. For more information about The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards and this year's honorees, visit  http://spirit.prudential.com or www.nassp.org/spirit. About NASSP The National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) is the leading organization of and voice for middle level and high school principals, assistant principals, and school leaders from across the United States. The association connects and engages school leaders through advocacy, research, education, and student programs. NASSP advocates on behalf of all school leaders to ensure the success of each student and strengthens school leadership practices through the design and delivery of high quality professional learning experiences. Reflecting its long-standing commitment to student leadership development, NASSP administers the National Honor Society, National Junior Honor Society, National Elementary Honor Society, and National Association of Student Councils. For more information about NASSP, located in Reston, VA, visit  www.nassp.org. About Prudential Financial Prudential Financial, Inc. (NYSE: PRU), a financial services leader, has operations in the United States, Asia, Europe, and Latin America. Prudential's diverse and talented employees are committed to helping individual and institutional customers grow and protect their wealth through a variety of products and services, including life insurance, annuities, retirement-related services, mutual funds and investment management. In the U.S., Prudential's iconic Rock symbol has stood for strength, stability, expertise and innovation for more than a century. For more information, please visit www.news.prudential.com. Editors: For pictures of the Spirit of Community Awards program logo and medallions, visit For B-roll of New York's honorees at the 2017 national recognition events, contact Prudential's Harold Banks at (973) 216-4833 or . To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/ariana-demattei-of-center-moriches-new-york-named-one-of-americas-top-10-youth-volunteers-of-2017-300452949.html


Harmonie, a fifth-grader at Polo Road Elementary School, sold lemonade to raise money and awareness to fight cancer, conducted a coat drive to keep those less fortunate warm in the winter, and volunteers at a local nursing home. After Harmonie's mother was diagnosed with breast cancer and her father was diagnosed with leukemia, Harmonie sold lemonade at her church to support cancer research. She also recruited friends to help out at a breast cancer fundraising walk and recognize survivors with pink roses. When Harmonie noticed that a friend came to school with no coat on a winter day to protect him from the cold and rain, she initiated a coat drive through her church and ended up with more than 800 garments for both children and adults. At a local nursing home, Harmonie plays the piano for the residents, calls out bingo numbers, serves ice cream, and polishes fingernails. "If you see a person in need, anyone can help," said Harmonie. "You don't need to give money, but you can help by doing small gestures to show that you care about them. I feel great when I can make someone happy." Abigail, a senior at Wade Hampton High School, oversaw a weeklong fundraising campaign by her school's student body that included more than 45 individual events and raised over $220,000 for children with congenital heart defects. As a member of her school's student council for three years, Abigail participated in many volunteer activities. But when she was elected student body president, she took charge of her school's annual "Spirit Week," which raises money for a different charity each year. To be the beneficiary of the 2016 Spirit Week last October, Abigail and her fellow council members chose the Emerson Rose Heart Foundation, a South Carolina nonprofit that works on behalf of kids born with heart defects. For Abigail, this was the perfect choice; she had long watched her best friend struggle through surgeries and other consequences of a congenital heart defect. For six months, Abigail supervised the planning and implementation of dozens of fundraising events for Spirit Week, and personally managed a parent night party, silent auction, painting class, midnight jam and bachelor auction. She also set out to raise money on her own by writing letters to solicit donations, selling cookies and candy at school, and hosting a golf tournament. By the end of the big week, Abigail and her fellow council members had raised $221,000 for children with congenital heart defects, and Abigail had broken her school's individual fundraising record with a total of more than $12,000. The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards is a national youth recognition program sponsored by Prudential Financial in partnership with the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP). "These honorees have done exemplary work to contribute to the health and vitality of their communities, and we look forward to seeing the great things they achieve in the future," said John Strangfeld, chairman and CEO of Prudential Financial, Inc. "Congratulations to each of these extraordinary young volunteers." "It's a privilege to celebrate these students not only for outstanding volunteer service, but for the example they've set for their peers," said Jayne Ellspermann, president of NASSP. "These honorees prove that one person truly can make a difference." In addition to Harmonie, these are the other 2017 National Honorees: Amal Bhatnagar, 18, of Duluth, Ga., a senior at Northview High School, created a student organization that has provided more than a thousand first-aid kits to people in the U.S. and overseas who lack access to basic healthcare. Riley Callen, 14, of Pawlet, Vt., an eighth-grader at Dorset Elementary School, founded an annual "hike-a-thon" in the hills of Vermont that has raised more than $250,000 to help find a cure for brain tumors, like the ones that have affected her since she was 8 years old. Ariana DeMattei, 16, of Center Moriches, N.Y., a junior at Westhampton Beach High School, has raised over $100,000 to provide more than 1,000 new backpacks filled with school supplies for local elementary students through an organization she founded in 2012 called "Backpacks for Fellow Students." Sarah (Katie) Eder, 17, of Shorewood, Wis., a junior at Shorewood High School, developed a creative writing workshop for children in need that is now being taught by 120 teens in seven states and five other countries. Bradley Ferguson, 16, of Northfield, N.J., a sophomore at Mainland Regional High School, started a service-learning club that over the past three years has supported veterans and people in need by refurbishing an American Legion post, collecting food for a community food bank, making lunches for homeless people, and growing fresh produce at several community gardens. Lorelei McIntyre-Brewer, 11, of Duncannon, Pa., a sixth-grader at The Cove School, built a volunteer network that has provided more than 12,000 special pillows for children around the world undergoing heart surgery. Kelsey Norris, 13, of Bonaire, Ga., a sixth-grader at Bonaire Middle School, overcame a challenging start in life to provide more than 1,000 volunteer hours and raise more than $20,000 for a wide variety of causes aiding children and others in difficult situations. Kenan Pala, 13, of San Diego, Calif., a seventh-grader at Francis Parker Middle School, launched an initiative to benefit homeless people by raising money for local shelters, coordinating meals each quarter at shelter kitchens, and organizing a record-setting cereal donation event. Meghana Reddy, 18, of La Mesa, Calif., a senior at Francis Parker School in San Diego, uses 3D printing technology to produce artificial hands for children and adults in several countries who cannot afford commercial prostheses. The distinguished selection committee that chose the National Honorees was chaired by Strangfeld and included Ellspermann of NASSP; Andrea Bastiani Archibald, chief girl expert for Girl Scouts of the USA; Kristofer Bolz with the national headquarters volunteer services team at the American Red Cross; Tracy Hoover, president of Points of Light; Peggy McLeod, deputy vice president of education and workforce development at the National Council of La Raza; Frederick J. Riley, national director of urban and youth development at YMCA of the USA; Linda Shiller, at-large member on the National PTA Board of Directors; Rhonda Taylor, acting deputy director of strategic communications and director of partnerships and program engagement for the Corporation for National and Community Service; Dru Tomlin, director of middle level services for the Association for Middle Level Education; and two 2016 National Honorees: Connor Archer, a freshman at Husson University in Bangor, Maine, and Alisha Zhao, a senior at Lincoln High School in Portland, Ore. Youth volunteers in grades 5-12 were invited to apply for 2017 Prudential Spirit of Community Awards last fall through schools, Girl Scout councils, county 4-H organizations, American Red Cross chapters, YMCAs and affiliates of the HandsOn Network. The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards program was created in 1995 to identify and recognize young people for outstanding volunteer service – and, in so doing, inspire others to volunteer, too. In the past 22 years, the program has honored more than 120,000 young volunteers at the local, state and national level. For more information about The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards and this year's honorees, visit  http://spirit.prudential.com or www.nassp.org/spirit. About NASSP The National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) is the leading organization of and voice for middle level and high school principals, assistant principals, and school leaders from across the United States. The association connects and engages school leaders through advocacy, research, education, and student programs. NASSP advocates on behalf of all school leaders to ensure the success of each student and strengthens school leadership practices through the design and delivery of high quality professional learning experiences. Reflecting its long-standing commitment to student leadership development, NASSP administers the National Honor Society, National Junior Honor Society, National Elementary Honor Society, and National Association of Student Councils. For more information about NASSP, located in Reston, VA, visit  www.nassp.org. About Prudential Financial Prudential Financial, Inc. (NYSE: PRU), a financial services leader, has operations in the United States, Asia, Europe, and Latin America. Prudential's diverse and talented employees are committed to helping individual and institutional customers grow and protect their wealth through a variety of products and services, including life insurance, annuities, retirement-related services, mutual funds and investment management. In the U.S., Prudential's iconic Rock symbol has stood for strength, stability, expertise and innovation for more than a century. For more information, please visit www.news.prudential.com. Editors: For pictures of the Spirit of Community Awards program logo and medallions, visit For B-roll of South Carolina's honorees at the 2017 national recognition events, contact Prudential's Harold Banks at (973) 216-4833 or . To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/harmonie-frederick-of-columbia-south-carolina-named-one-of-americas-top-10-youth-volunteers-of-2017-300452975.html


Lorelei, a sixth-grader at The Cove School, built a volunteer network that has provided more than 12,000 special pillows for children around the world undergoing heart surgery. Lorelei was born without a left ventricle in her heart and has endured 26 medical procedures. After Lorelei's third open heart surgery, her lungs filled with fluid and collapsed. She was given a "compression heart pillow" to help manage pain and express fluids, but the pillow was adult-size, and much too big for Lorelei. She decided that kids like her needed kid-size pillows. "I knew what it was like to go through the pain of open heart surgery. I wanted to come up with a way to make it easier for other kids," said Lorelei. Lorelei learned to sew, bought materials with her own money, and began making one pediatric compression heart pillow per day. As word got out, people started contacting her to request pillows or offer to help make them. To coordinate the work of volunteers both near and far, Lorelei worked with a seamstress to create a pattern, and consulted with a medical team at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia about how to sterilize the pillows and package them safely. Lorelei has sent her pillows to young heart patients as far away as Ireland, China and South Africa. She also has raised more than $25,000 to support cardiac care for children. "I'm missing half a heart, but that won't stop me," she said. Amanda, a junior at Upper Dublin High School, teaches art classes for residents of six local nursing homes, and wrote a book to share her methods and projects with caregivers at other retirement facilities. Amanda saw firsthand how difficult it is to grow old when she watched her grandparents struggle with mental and physical decline. "I wanted to do something to help seniors like my grandparents," she said. An art lover since her elementary school days, Amanda decided she would form a nonprofit, "hART to heart," and share her passion with nursing home residents. She began volunteering every Saturday at a local nursing home. She designed easy and fun "senior- friendly" art projects and then helped the residents complete those projects. Said Amanda: "I soon noticed that my class imparted a sense of agency, accomplishment and belonging to the seniors," who displayed their creations in their rooms and gave them as gifts to grandchildren. Motivated by her success, Amanda expanded her class to five other nursing homes, reaching a total of about 200 seniors. She also wrote a 60-page book describing 11 of her art projects, so that caregivers at other nursing homes can employ her methods in their work with the elderly. The book so far has been used in 18 states across the country, according to Amanda. "Through my work, I've seen how art can be a vehicle for keeping seniors engaged mentally and physically, thereby enhancing their health," she said. The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards is a national youth recognition program sponsored by Prudential Financial in partnership with the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP). "These honorees have done exemplary work to contribute to the health and vitality of their communities, and we look forward to seeing the great things they achieve in the future," said John Strangfeld, chairman and CEO of Prudential Financial, Inc. "Congratulations to each of these extraordinary young volunteers." "It's a privilege to celebrate these students not only for outstanding volunteer service, but for the example they've set for their peers," said Jayne Ellspermann, president of NASSP. "These honorees prove that one person truly can make a difference." In addition to Lorelei, these are the other 2017 National Honorees: Amal Bhatnagar, 18, of Duluth, Ga., a senior at Northview High School, created a student organization that has provided more than a thousand first-aid kits to people in the U.S. and overseas who lack access to basic healthcare. Riley Callen, 14, of Pawlet, Vt., an eighth-grader at Dorset Elementary School, founded an annual "hike-a-thon" in the hills of Vermont that has raised more than $250,000 to help find a cure for brain tumors, like the ones that have affected her since she was 8 years old. Ariana DeMattei, 16, of Center Moriches, N.Y., a junior at Westhampton Beach High School, has raised over $100,000 to provide more than 1,000 new backpacks filled with school supplies for local elementary students through an organization she founded in 2012 called "Backpacks for Fellow Students." Sarah (Katie) Eder, 17, of Shorewood, Wis., a junior at Shorewood High School, developed a creative writing workshop for children in need that is now being taught by 120 teens in seven states and five other countries. Bradley Ferguson, 16, of Northfield, N.J., a sophomore at Mainland Regional High School, started a service-learning club that over the past three years has supported veterans and people in need by refurbishing an American Legion post, collecting food for a community food bank, making lunches for homeless people, and growing fresh produce at several community gardens. Harmonie Frederick, 11, of Columbia, S.C., a fifth-grader at Polo Road Elementary School, sold lemonade to raise money and awareness to fight cancer, conducted a coat drive to keep those less fortunate warm in the winter, and volunteers at a local nursing home. Kelsey Norris, 13, of Bonaire, Ga., a sixth-grader at Bonaire Middle School, overcame a challenging start in life to provide more than 1,000 volunteer hours and raise more than $20,000 for a wide variety of causes aiding children and others in difficult situations. Kenan Pala, 13, of San Diego, Calif., a seventh-grader at Francis Parker Middle School, launched an initiative to benefit homeless people by raising money for local shelters, coordinating meals each quarter at shelter kitchens, and organizing a record-setting cereal donation event. Meghana Reddy, 18, of La Mesa, Calif., a senior at Francis Parker School in San Diego, uses 3D printing technology to produce artificial hands for children and adults in several countries who cannot afford commercial prostheses. The distinguished selection committee that chose the National Honorees was chaired by Strangfeld and included Ellspermann of NASSP; Andrea Bastiani Archibald, chief girl expert for Girl Scouts of the USA; Kristofer Bolz with the national headquarters volunteer services team at the American Red Cross; Tracy Hoover, president of Points of Light; Peggy McLeod, deputy vice president of education and workforce development at the National Council of La Raza; Frederick J. Riley, national director of urban and youth development at YMCA of the USA; Linda Shiller, at-large member on the National PTA Board of Directors; Rhonda Taylor, acting deputy director of strategic communications and director of partnerships and program engagement for the Corporation for National and Community Service; Dru Tomlin, director of middle level services for the Association for Middle Level Education; and two 2016 National Honorees: Connor Archer, a freshman at Husson University in Bangor, Maine, and Alisha Zhao, a senior at Lincoln High School in Portland, Ore. Youth volunteers in grades 5-12 were invited to apply for 2017 Prudential Spirit of Community Awards last fall through schools, Girl Scout councils, county 4-H organizations, American Red Cross chapters, YMCAs and affiliates of the HandsOn Network. The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards program was created in 1995 to identify and recognize young people for outstanding volunteer service – and, in so doing, inspire others to volunteer, too. In the past 22 years, the program has honored more than 120,000 young volunteers at the local, state and national level. For more information about The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards and this year's honorees, visit  http://spirit.prudential.com or www.nassp.org/spirit. About NASSP The National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) is the leading organization of and voice for middle level and high school principals, assistant principals, and school leaders from across the United States. The association connects and engages school leaders through advocacy, research, education, and student programs. NASSP advocates on behalf of all school leaders to ensure the success of each student and strengthens school leadership practices through the design and delivery of high quality professional learning experiences. Reflecting its long-standing commitment to student leadership development, NASSP administers the National Honor Society, National Junior Honor Society, National Elementary Honor Society, and National Association of Student Councils. For more information about NASSP, located in Reston, VA, visit  www.nassp.org. About Prudential Financial Prudential Financial, Inc. (NYSE: PRU), a financial services leader, has operations in the United States, Asia, Europe, and Latin America. Prudential's diverse and talented employees are committed to helping individual and institutional customers grow and protect their wealth through a variety of products and services, including life insurance, annuities, retirement-related services, mutual funds and investment management. In the U.S., Prudential's iconic Rock symbol has stood for strength, stability, expertise and innovation for more than a century. For more information, please visit www.news.prudential.com. Editors: For pictures of the Spirit of Community Awards program logo and medallions, visit For B-roll of Pennsylvania's honorees at the 2017 national recognition events, contact Prudential's Harold Banks at (973) 216-4833 or . To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/lorelei-mcintyre-brewer-of-duncannon-pennsylvania-named-one-of-americas-top-10-youth-volunteers-of-2017-300452951.html


Today's ceremony was part of a four-day celebration that brought each state's top two youth volunteers of 2017 to Washington, D.C., for sightseeing and special recognition events. These State Honorees – one middle level and one high school student from each state and the District of Columbia – were personally congratulated by Olympic gold medalist Michael Phelps last night at a gala dinner reception at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. Each State Honoree received a $1,000 award. These are the 10 National Honorees named today: Amal Bhatnagar, 18, of Duluth, Ga., a senior at Northview High School, created a student organization that has provided more than a thousand first-aid kits to people in the U.S. and overseas who lack access to basic healthcare. Riley Callen, 14, of Pawlet, Vt., an eighth-grader at Dorset Elementary School, founded an annual "hike-a-thon" in the hills of Vermont that has raised more than $250,000 to help find a cure for brain tumors, like the ones that have affected her since she was 8 years old. Ariana DeMattei, 16, of Center Moriches, N.Y., a junior at Westhampton Beach High School, has raised over $100,000 to provide more than 1,000 new backpacks filled with school supplies for local elementary students through an organization she founded in 2012 called "Backpacks for Fellow Students." Sarah (Katie) Eder, 17, of Shorewood, Wis., a junior at Shorewood High School, developed a creative writing workshop for children in need that is now being taught by 120 teens in seven states and five other countries. Bradley Ferguson, 16, of Northfield, N.J., a sophomore at Mainland Regional High School, started a service-learning club that over the past three years has supported veterans and people in need by refurbishing an American Legion post, collecting food for a community food bank, making lunches for homeless people, and growing fresh produce at several community gardens. Harmonie Frederick, 11, of Columbia, S.C., a fifth-grader at Polo Road Elementary School, sold lemonade to raise money and awareness to fight cancer, conducted a coat drive to keep those less fortunate warm in the winter, and volunteers at a local nursing home. Lorelei McIntyre-Brewer, 11, of Duncannon, Pa., a sixth-grader at The Cove School, built a volunteer network that has provided more than 12,000 special pillows for children around the world undergoing heart surgery. Kelsey Norris, 13, of Bonaire, Ga., a sixth-grader at Bonaire Middle School, overcame a challenging start in life to provide more than 1,000 volunteer hours and raise more than $20,000 for a wide variety of causes aiding children and others in difficult situations. Kenan Pala, 13, of San Diego, Calif., a seventh-grader at Francis Parker Middle School, launched an initiative to benefit homeless people by raising money for local shelters, coordinating meals each quarter at shelter kitchens, and organizing a record-setting cereal donation event. Meghana Reddy, 18, of La Mesa, Calif., a senior at Francis Parker School in San Diego, uses 3D printing technology to produce artificial hands for children and adults in several countries who cannot afford commercial prostheses. "These honorees have done exemplary work to contribute to the health and vitality of their communities, and we look forward to seeing the great things they achieve in the future," said John Strangfeld, chairman and CEO of Prudential Financial, Inc. "Congratulations to each of these extraordinary young volunteers." "It's a privilege to celebrate these students not only for outstanding volunteer service, but for the example they've set for their peers," said Jayne Ellspermann, president of NASSP. "These honorees prove that one person truly can make a difference." The distinguished selection committee that chose the National Honorees was chaired by Strangfeld and included Ellspermann of NASSP; Andrea Bastiani Archibald, chief girl expert for Girl Scouts of the USA; Kristofer Bolz with the national headquarters volunteer services team at the American Red Cross; Tracy Hoover, president of Points of Light; Peggy McLeod, deputy vice president of education and workforce development at the National Council of La Raza; Frederick J. Riley, national director of urban and youth development at YMCA of the USA; Linda Shiller, at-large member on the National PTA Board of Directors; Rhonda Taylor, acting deputy director of strategic communications and director of partnerships and program engagement for the Corporation for National and Community Service; Dru Tomlin, director of middle level services for the Association for Middle Level Education; and two 2016 National Honorees: Connor Archer, a freshman at Husson University in Bangor, Maine, and Alisha Zhao, a senior at Lincoln High School in Portland, Ore. The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards was created in 1995 to identify and recognize young people for outstanding volunteer service – and, in so doing, inspire others to volunteer, too. In the past 22 years, the program has honored more than 120,000 young volunteers at the local, state and national level. For more information about The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards and this year's honorees, visit http://spirit.prudential.com or www.nassp.org/spirit. The National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) is the leading organization of and voice for middle level and high school principals, assistant principals, and school leaders from across the United States. The association connects and engages school leaders through advocacy, research, education, and student programs. NASSP advocates on behalf of all school leaders to ensure the success of each student and strengthens school leadership practices through the design and delivery of high quality professional learning experiences. Reflecting its long-standing commitment to student leadership development, NASSP administers the National Honor Society, National Junior Honor Society, National Elementary Honor Society, and National Association of Student Councils. For more information about NASSP, located in Reston, VA, visit www.nassp.org. Prudential Financial, Inc. (NYSE: PRU), a financial services leader, has operations in the United States, Asia, Europe, and Latin America. Prudential's diverse and talented employees are committed to helping individual and institutional customers grow and protect their wealth through a variety of products and services, including life insurance, annuities, retirement-related services, mutual funds and investment management. In the U.S., Prudential's iconic Rock symbol has stood for strength, stability, expertise and innovation for more than a century. For more information, please visit www.news.prudential.com. Editors: For pictures of the Prudential Spirit of Community Awards program logo and medallions, visit https://spirit.prudential.com/resources/media. For digital photos or B-roll of the National Honorees at the 2017 national recognition events, contact Prudential's Harold Banks at (973) 216-4833 or harold.banks@prudential.com. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/americas-top-10-youth-volunteers-of-2017-named-at-22nd-annual-prudential-spirit-of-community-awards-300453301.html

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