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Independence, OH, United States

Adams T.M.,Corporate Center | Munson D.,EPRI
International Conference on Nuclear Engineering, Proceedings, ICONE | Year: 2012

For corroded piping in low temperature systems, such as service water systems in nuclear power plants, replacement of carbon steel pipe with high density polyethylene (HDPE) pipe is a cost-effective solution. Polyethylene pipe can be installed at much lower labor costs than carbon steel pipe and HDPE pipe has a much greater resistance to corrosion. HDPE pipe has been successfully used in non-safety related systems in nuclear power facilities and is commonly used in other industries such as water mains and natural gas pipelines. Via Code Case N-755-1, the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (BPVC), Section III, Division 1, currently permits the use of non-metallic HDPE piping in buried safety Class 3 piping systems. This paper presents the basis for the fatigue stress values to be used for HDPE in the ASME BPVC Section III, Division 1, Class 3 Construction This information was developed based on testing support by the Electric Power Research Institute. Stress Intensification Factors (SIF) and flexibility factors for use in the design and analysis of HDPE piping systems in nuclear safety-related applications will be provided in the Code and the basis of these stress intensification and flexibility factors is provided. This data may also be useful for applications of HDPE pipe in commercial electric power generation facilities and chemical, process, and waste water plants via its possible use in the B31 series piping codes. Copyright © 2012 by ASME. Source


Price P.,Dow Chemical Company | Dhein E.,Corporate Center | Hamer M.,Hill International | Han X.,Dow Chemical Company | And 6 more authors.
Environmental Sciences Europe | Year: 2012

Background: The Cefic Mixtures Industry Ad-hoc Team (MIAT) has investigated how risks from combined exposures can be effectively identified and managed using concepts proposed in recent regulatory guidance, new advances in risk assessment, and lessons learned from a Cefic-sponsored case study of mixture exposures. Results: A series of tools were created that include: a decision tree, a system for grouping exposures, and a graphical tool (the MCR-HI plot). The decision tree allows the division of combined exposures into different groups, exposures where one or more individual components are a concern, exposures that are of low concern, and exposures that are a concern for combined effects but not for the effects of individual chemicals. These tools efficiently use available data, identify critical data gaps for combined assessments, and prioritize which chemicals require detailed toxicity information. The tools can be used to address multiple human health endpoints and ecological effects. Conclusion: The tools provide a useful approach for assessing risks associated with combined exposures to multiple chemicals. © 2012 Price et al.; licensee Springer. Source


Kang I.,Korea University | Choi S.,Corporate Center | Jung S.,Korea University | Lee S.,Korea University
Journal of Computer Science and Technology | Year: 2010

Hybrid Peer-to-Peer (P2P) systems that construct overlay networks structured among superpeers have great potential in that they can give the benefits such as scalability, search speed and network traffic, taking advantages of superpeer-based and the structured P2P systems. In this article, we enhance keyword search in hybrid P2P systems by constructing a tree-based index overlay among directory nodes that maintain indices, according to the load and popularity of a keyword. The mathematical analysis shows that the keyword search based on semi-structured P2P overlay can improve the search performance, reducing the message traffic and maintenance costs. © 2010 Springer. Source


Adams T.M.,Corporate Center | Nickholds S.,Corporate Center | Munson D.,EPRI | Andrasik J.,Smithers Rapra Ltd
American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Pressure Vessels and Piping Division (Publication) PVP | Year: 2014

For corroded piping in low temperature systems, such as service water systems in nuclear power plants, replacement of carbon steel piping with high density polyethylene (HDPE) is a cost-effective solution. Polyethylene pipe can be installed at much lower labor costs that carbon steel pipe and HDPE pipe has a much greater resistance to corrosion. The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III, Division 1 currently permits the use of non-metallic piping in buried safety Class 3 piping systems. Additionally, HDPE pipe has been successfully used in non-safety-related systems in nuclear power facilities and is commonly used in other industries such as water mains and natural gas pipelines. This report presents the results of updated fatigue testing of PE 4710 cell classification 445574C pipe compliant with the specific Code requirements. This information was developed to support and provide a strong technical basis for material properties of HDPE pipe for use in ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III New Construction and Section XI repair or replacement activities. The data may also be useful for applications of HDPE pipe in commercial electric power generation facilities and chemical, process and waste water plants via its possible use in the B31 series piping codes. The report provides fatigue data in the form of Code S-N curves for fusion butt joints in PE 4710 cell classification 445574C HDPE pipe. Copyright © 2014 by ASME. Source


Munson D.,EPRI | Adams T.M.,Corporate Center | Nickholds S.,Corporate Center
American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Pressure Vessels and Piping Division (Publication) PVP | Year: 2012

For corroded piping in low temperature systems, such as service water systems in nuclear power plants, replacement of carbon steel pipe with High Density Polyethylene pipe is a cost-effective solution. Polyethylene pipe can be installed at much lower labor costs than carbon steel pipe and High Density Polyethylene pipe has a much greater resistance to corrosion. Data was developed by the three testing tasks for use in the seismic design of above ground High Density Polyethylene Piping systems. This paper presents the results of testing to determine the relationship between tensile elastic modulus and strain rates commensurate with seismic loading. This is accomplished by first establishing a seismic strain rate for High Density Polyethlene using detailed finite element analysis. The results of this analysis are used to establish a test matrix tensile testing. Next, tensile tests are conducted using standard ASTM D-638 Type III tensile specimens. The tensile testing is conducted at three pull speeds to establish a basic relationship between tensile elastic modulus and strain rates. This relationship is then used to calculate the modulus at the strain rates expected under seismic loading. This paper presents the results of this testing and the suggested tensile modulus for use in seismic analysis. Copyright © 2012 by ASME. Source

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