Corning Advanced Optics

Corning, NY, United States

Corning Advanced Optics

Corning, NY, United States
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Wang J.,Corning Advanced Optics | Cangemi M.J.,Corning Advanced Optics | Oudard J.F.,Corning Advanced Optics | Trost M.,Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering | And 3 more authors.
Optics InfoBase Conference Papers | Year: 2016

Angle resolved scatter measurement was performed on uncoated and AR coated CaF2. Subsurface-damage-free CaF2 and AR coatings with smoothed capping led to 4-fold and 2-fold scatter reduction when compared to the corresponding super polished CaF2. © OSA 2016.


Wang A.Q.,Johns Hopkins University | Wang J.,Corning Advanced Optics | D'lallo M.J.,Corning Advanced Optics | Platten J.E.,Corning Advanced Optics | And 2 more authors.
Thin Solid Films | Year: 2015

Laser durable multiband high reflective optics can be attained by depositing HfO2/SiO2 stacks on diamond-turned and optically polished aluminum alloy substrates. HfO2 and SiO2 single layers were prepared using modified plasma-ion assisted deposition. Ellipsometric measurements were performed using two types of variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry with a combined spectral range of 150nm to 14μm. Optical constants were generated in the entire spectral range. Scatter loss as a function of surface roughness was calculated at 1064nm, 1572nm, and 4.1μm, representing a primary wavelength, a secondary wavelength, and a middle wave infrared band selected for a dual-wavelength laser beam expander, respectively. The surface requirement of the aluminum alloy substrates was determined. Calculated and measured spectral reflectances were compared. Laser-induced damage threshold tests were performed at 1064nm, 20ns, and 20Hz. A laser-induced damage threshold of 47J/cm2 was determined. Post-damage analysis suggests that nodule defects are the limiting factor for the laser-induced damage threshold. Surface modification of the aluminum alloy was identified as a potential technical solution that may further increase the laser damage resistance of the dielectric enhanced dual-wavelength reflective optics. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.


Wang J.,Corning Advanced Optics | Hart G.A.,Corning Advanced Optics | Oudard J.F.,Corning Advanced Optics | Wamboldt L.,Corning Advanced Optics | Roy B.P.,Corning Advanced Optics
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2016

HfO2/SiO2 multilayer based reflective optics enable threat detection in the short-wave/middle-wave infrared and high power laser targeting capability in the near infrared. On the other hand, HfO2/SiO2 multilayer based transmissive optics empower early missile warning by taking advantage of the extremely low noise light detection in the deep-ultraviolet region where solar irradiation is strongly absorbed by the ozone layer of the earth's atmosphere. The former requires high laser damage resistance, whereas the latter needs a solar-blind property, i.e., high transmission of the radiation below 290 nm and strong suppression of the solar background from 300 nm above. The technical challenges in both cases are revealed. The spectral limits associated with the HfO2 and SiO2 films are discussed and design concepts are schematically illustrated. Spectral performances are realized for potential A&D and commercial applications. © 2016 SPIE.


Cobb J.M.,Corning Advanced Optics | Michaloski P.,Corning Advanced Optics
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2011

Speckle degrades the contrast of the fringe patterns in laser interferometers that measure rough objects. In this paper, we describe a speckle reduction system that can be used with high speed cameras to increase the frame rates of the interferometer and creates less vibration in the system. © 2011 Copyright Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).


Staloff D.,Corning Advanced Optics | Comstock L.,Corning Advanced Optics | Miller W.,Corning Advanced Optics | Schreiber H.,Corning Advanced Optics
Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE | Year: 2016

Many fiber based probes used in Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) are comprised of a spacer, GRIN lens, fiber, and a microprism. This design form suffers from many material interfaces, which induce back reflections into the sample arm of the interferometer. With so many interfaces, these probes can produce artifacts in the system's imaging window. We present a design which has just two interfaces to minimize image artifacts. The two components of this design are the fiber endface and a reflective optic. With optimization, these two components can produce back reflections below -90dB which will minimize image artifacts. This will results in high fidelity imaging for medical diagnostics. Copyright © 2016 SPIE.


Staloff D.,Corning Advanced Optics | Hartkorn K.,Corning Inc.
Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE | Year: 2015

Many fiber based probes used in Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) are comprised of a spacer, GRadient INdex (GRIN) lens, and a microprism. This design has the benefit of being relatively simple given the need for only three optical components. However, because of constraints to optical performance specifications, such as the probe working distance and spot size, the spacer and GRIN lens will have demanding and difficult tolerances for component length. These tolerances are a detriment to high volume manufacturing. In this paper we present an alternative monolithic, single component design form which is more robust and eliminates the manufacturing constraints of the present design form, thereby making it ideally suited for high volume manufacturing. © 2015 SPIE.


Ziph-Schatzberg L.,Corning Advanced Optics | Woodman P.,Corning Advanced Optics | Nakanishi K.,Corning Advanced Optics | Cornell J.,Corning Advanced Optics | And 2 more authors.
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2015

Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is a technology that is rapidly transitioning from laboratory research and field demonstration to real-world deployment for a variety of applications. These applications include precision agriculture, manufacturing process monitoring, mineral and petroleum exploration, environmental management, disaster mitigation, defense intelligence/surveillance/reconnaissance for threat detection and identification, as well as a host of applications within the bio-medical field. Application-specific algorithms are continuously being developed to support the world-wide expanding use of HSI. Corning Incorporated has been developing and manufacturing HSI sensors, sensor systems, and sensor optical engines, as well as HSI sensor components such as gratings and slits for over a decade and a half. Corning's gratings include UV to IR spectral coverage, multiple glass, metallic, and non-metallic substrates, substrate figures from plane to spherical, to biconic aspheres, application optimized groove profiles from triangular to dual blaze to phase stepped, and groove periods from regular to chirped to aberration correcting. This depth of experience and technological breadth has allowed Corning to design and develop unique HSI spectrographs with an unprecedented combination of high performance, low cost and low Size, Weight, and Power (SWaP). These sensors and sensor systems are offered with wavelength coverage ranges from the visible to the Long Wave Infrared (LWIR). The extremely low SWaP of Corning HSI sensors and sensor systems enables their deployment using limited payload platforms such as small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) or human hands. Mobile applications are also facilitated by Corning's built-in miniature scanner that works seamlessly with a compact push-broom HSI sensor using Corning proprietary software to collect complete data cubes. This paper discusses proprietary designs of Corning HSI sensors and systems, as well as the inhouse manufacturing capabilities that enable the cost-effective fabrication of these sensors. Specific designs of Corning HSI visNIR, SWIR and uncooled LWIR systems are presented along with salient performance characteristics. We also discuss the use of Corning HSI sensor systems for real-world applications. © 2015 SPIE.


Wang A.Q.,Johns Hopkins University | Wang J.,Corning Advanced Optics | D'Lallo M.J.,Corning Advanced Optics | Platten J.E.,Corning Advanced Optics | And 2 more authors.
Thin Solid Films | Year: 2015

Laser durable multiband high reflective optics can be attained by depositing HfO2/SiO2 stacks on diamond-turned and optically polished aluminum alloy substrates. HfO2 and SiO2 single layers were prepared using modified plasma-ion assisted deposition. Ellipsometric measurements were performed using two types of variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry with a combined spectral range of 150 nm to 14 μm. Optical constants were generated in the entire spectral range. Scatter loss as a function of surface roughness was calculated at 1064 nm, 1572 nm, and 4.1 μm, representing a primary wavelength, a secondary wavelength, and a middle wave infrared band selected for a dual-wavelength laser beam expander, respectively. The surface requirement of the aluminum alloy substrates was determined. Calculated and measured spectral reflectances were compared. Laser-induced damage threshold tests were performed at 1064 nm, 20 ns, and 20 Hz. A laser-induced damage threshold of 47 J/cm2 was determined. Post-damage analysis suggests that nodule defects are the limiting factor for the laser-induced damage threshold. Surface modification of the aluminum alloy was identified as a potential technical solution that may further increase the laser damage resistance of the dielectric enhanced dual-wavelength reflective optics. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

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