Coral Cay Conservation

London, United Kingdom

Coral Cay Conservation

London, United Kingdom

Time filter

Source Type

News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

Ocean Trash removal company plans to make Earth Day one to remember. Boca Raton, FL, April 20, 2017 --( Since 1970, Earth Day has been celebrated worldwide as a day to bring awareness to growing environmental issues and demonstrate support for environmental protection. 4Ocean knows the importance of preserving the ocean’s beauty and wants to remind everyone that we should all be helping to make a difference not just on Earth Day, but every day. Exclusively for Earth Day, 4Ocean will be releasing their 4Ocean understands the significance of utilizing existing glass and plastic that has already been produced. They have a vision to eliminate the production of any materials that may one day end up as trash in the ocean – which is why their bracelets are made from 100% recycled materials. The beads of the bracelet are created from recycled glass bottles while the cord is made from post-consumer recycled water bottles. For every single bracelet purchased, the 4Ocean team pledges to remove one pound of trash from the ocean. Through the sales of their bracelets, 4Ocean is able to obtain the tools, equipment, and vehicles needed to fund both onshore and offshore cleanups that would otherwise not be possible. As of April 2017, 4Ocean has been able to actively carry out their mission and has removed over 46,000 pounds of trash thanks to the support they have received. The 4Ocean team encourages everyone to help do their part to save our oceans. Co-founder Andrew Cooper says, “The age we live in, it is easy to wait for a machine to come and clean the ocean of 1 million pounds of trash at a time, however it is more pragmatic to convince 1 million people to clean only 1 pound of trash at a time.” To learn more about their efforts and how you can make a difference please visit 4Ocean.com this Earth Day or watch the Boca Raton, FL, April 20, 2017 --( PR.com )-- 4Ocean, an Ocean Conservation Company whose mission is to create a sustainable future for the ocean, just announced their plans for Earth Day – and you’re not going to want to miss this. Founded in January 2017, 4Ocean co-founder Andrew Cooper proudly stated, “After already successfully removing over 46,000 pounds of marine debris in just 3 months of launching, I am positive that this Earth Day will be our biggest success to date.” On April 22, 2017, 4Ocean will be hosting multiple international cleanups to remove as much trash as possible from the oceans and coastlines. Their efforts will be seen in Boca Raton, Florida, with corresponding cleanups in the Philippines, and Montserrat where they have partnered with the Coral Cay Conservation Since 1970, Earth Day has been celebrated worldwide as a day to bring awareness to growing environmental issues and demonstrate support for environmental protection. 4Ocean knows the importance of preserving the ocean’s beauty and wants to remind everyone that we should all be helping to make a difference not just on Earth Day, but every day. Exclusively for Earth Day, 4Ocean will be releasing their 4Ocean Earth Day bracelets which will feature a green cord, instead of their signature blue cord. The 4Ocean bracelet is a reminder to the person wearing the bracelet that because of their support, the ocean is becoming a cleaner place for us and marine life to live.4Ocean understands the significance of utilizing existing glass and plastic that has already been produced. They have a vision to eliminate the production of any materials that may one day end up as trash in the ocean – which is why their bracelets are made from 100% recycled materials. The beads of the bracelet are created from recycled glass bottles while the cord is made from post-consumer recycled water bottles. For every single bracelet purchased, the 4Ocean team pledges to remove one pound of trash from the ocean. Through the sales of their bracelets, 4Ocean is able to obtain the tools, equipment, and vehicles needed to fund both onshore and offshore cleanups that would otherwise not be possible.As of April 2017, 4Ocean has been able to actively carry out their mission and has removed over 46,000 pounds of trash thanks to the support they have received.The 4Ocean team encourages everyone to help do their part to save our oceans. Co-founder Andrew Cooper says, “The age we live in, it is easy to wait for a machine to come and clean the ocean of 1 million pounds of trash at a time, however it is more pragmatic to convince 1 million people to clean only 1 pound of trash at a time.”To learn more about their efforts and how you can make a difference please visit 4Ocean.com this Earth Day or watch the Ocean Cleanup Video 4Ocean Earth Day Bracelet Make a difference this Earth Day and remove one pound of trash from the ocean by purchasing 4Ocean's exclusive Earth Day Bracelet. Filename: earthdaypr.jpg Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from 4Ocean


Sheppard C.R.C.,University of Warwick | Ateweberhan M.,University of Warwick | Bowen B.W.,Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology | Carr P.,BF BIOT | And 37 more authors.
Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems | Year: 2012

The Chagos Archipelago was designated a no-take marine protected area (MPA) in 2010; it covers 550 000km2, with more than 60 000km2 shallow limestone platform and reefs. This has doubled the global cover of such MPAs. It contains 25-50% of the Indian Ocean reef area remaining in excellent condition, as well as the world's largest contiguous undamaged reef area. It has suffered from warming episodes, but after the most severe mortality event of 1998, coral cover was restored after 10years. Coral reef fishes are orders of magnitude more abundant than in other Indian Ocean locations, regardless of whether the latter are fished or protected. Coral diseases are extremely low, and no invasive marine species are known. Genetically, Chagos marine species are part of the Western Indian Ocean, and Chagos serves as a 'stepping-stone' in the ocean. The no-take MPA extends to the 200nm boundary, and. includes 86 unfished seamounts and 243 deep knolls as well as encompassing important pelagic species. On the larger islands, native plants, coconut crabs, bird and turtle colonies were largely destroyed in plantation times, but several smaller islands are in relatively undamaged state. There are now 10 'important bird areas', coconut crab density is high and numbers of green and hawksbill turtles are recovering. Diego Garcia atoll contains a military facility; this atoll contains one Ramsar site and several 'strict nature reserves'. Pollutant monitoring shows it to be the least polluted inhabited atoll in the world. Today, strict environmental regulations are enforced. Shoreline erosion is significant in many places. Its economic cost in the inhabited part of Diego Garcia is very high, but all islands are vulnerable. Chagos is ideally situated for several monitoring programmes, and use is increasingly being made of the archipelago for this purpose. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


PubMed | Zoological Society of London, James Cook University, University of Florida, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology and 21 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Aquatic conservation : marine and freshwater ecosystems | Year: 2014

The Chagos Archipelago was designated a no-take marine protected area (MPA) in 2010; it covers 550 000 km


Cummings K.,University of Florida | Zuke A.,Coral Cay Conservation | De Stasio B.,Lawrence University | Krumholz J.,National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Ecological Restoration | Year: 2015

Anthropogenic pressure on coral reef ecosystems has increased the need for effective restoration and rehabilitation as a management tool. However, quantifying the success of restoration projects can be difficult, and adequate monitoring data are scarce. This study compared growth rates over a six-year period of three Caribbean coral species, staghorn coral (Acropora cervicornis), elkhorn coral (Acropora palmata), and thick finger coral (Porites porites), transplanted on an artificial reef off Maiden Island, Antigua, to literature values for the same species growing on naturally formed reefs in the Caribbean region. The average growth rate of staghorn coral was considerably lower than growth rates reported in the literature, while elkhorn and finger corals showed growth rates similar to literature values. The observed inter-and intraspecific differences may be caused by species-specific growth requirements and/or restoration site conditions, factors that should be taken into account when planning future projects involving coral transplant or rescue. This study also determined the analytical precision of a 'low tech' monitoring method using a basic underwater digital camera and the software program ImageJ to measure growth rates of corals. Measurement error between volunteer analysts receiving only minimal training was shown to be very small, ranging from 0.37-1.40% depending on the coral species. This confirms the validity of this basic technique, particularly in cases where data are sparse and resources for monitoring are extremely limited. © 2015 by the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System.


Dawson J.,Coral Cay Conservation | Turner C.,Jaquelin Fisher Associates | Pileng O.,Coral Cay Conservation | Pileng O.,Walindi Nature Center | And 5 more authors.
Tropical Conservation Science | Year: 2011

From June, 2007, to February, 2009, the Waria Valley Community Conservation and Sustainable Livelihoods Project (WVCP) completed an inventory survey of the birds of the lower Waria Valley, Morobe Province, Papua New Guinea. Four land use types -- agricultural, secondary forest edge, primary forest edge and primary forest -- were surveyed using Mackinnon list surveys. In total, 125 species representing 43 families were identified, of which 54 (43.2%) are endemic to the islands of New Guinea and the Bismark Archipelago. The avifauna of primary forest edge and primary forest was more species rich and diverse than that of agricultural habitats. Agricultural habitats also differed significantly in both overall community composition and some aspects of guild composition compared to all three forested habitats. Nectarivores and insectivore-frugivores formed a significantly larger proportion of species in agricultural habitats, whereas obligate frugivores formed a significantly greater proportion in forested habitats. We propose further survey and management initiatives that could help contribute to the conservation and sustainable use of the area's important biological resources. © Jeff Dawson, Craig Turner, Oscar Pileng, Andrew Farmer, Cara McGary, Chris Walsh, Alexia Tamblyn and Cossey Yosi.


Dawson J.,Coral Cay Conservation | Turner C.,Jaquelin Fisher Associates | Pileng O.,Coral Cay Conservation | Pileng O.,Walindi Nature Center | And 5 more authors.
Australian Mammalogy | Year: 2012

From June 2007 to February 2009 the Waria Valley Community Conservation and Sustainable Livelihoods Project completed a mist net survey of bats in the lower Waria Valley, Morobe Province, Papua New Guinea. The Waria Valley is located on the north coast of the Morobe Province ∼190km south-east of Lae, and still has large tracts of intact lowland hill and plain rainforest. Four broad habitats (agricultural, secondary forest edge, primary forest edge and primary forest) were surveyed using mist nets. A total of 596 individuals representing 11 species were caught, measured and identified over 8824 net-m h-1 across 99 nights. Within the limitations of this method, primary forest edge sites in general showed the highest degree of species richness and diversity and along with secondary forest edge sites were more even in species composition. Primary forest and agricultural sites were each dominated by a single species, Syconycteris australis and Macroglossus minimus respectively. Most captures were megachiropterans and microchiropterans were underrepresented, presumably in part because of the survey method employed. Journal compilation © Australian Mammal Society 2012.

Loading Coral Cay Conservation collaborators
Loading Coral Cay Conservation collaborators