Copenhagen, Denmark
Copenhagen, Denmark

The University of Copenhagen is the oldest university and research institution in Denmark. Founded in 1479 as a studium generale, it is the second oldest institution for higher education in Scandinavia after Uppsala University . The university has 23,473 undergraduate students, 17,398 postgraduate students, 2,968 doctoral students and more than 9,000 employees. The university has four campuses located in and around Copenhagen, with the headquarters located in central Copenhagen. Most courses are taught in Danish; however, many courses are also offered in English and a few in German. The university has several thousands of foreign students, of whom about half come from Nordic countries.The university is a member of the prestigious International Alliance of Research Universities , along with University of Cambridge, University of Oxford, Yale University, The Australian National University, and UC Berkeley, amongst others. The Academic Ranking of World Universities, compiled by Shanghai Jiao Tong University, saw the University of Copenhagen as the leading university in Scandinavia and ranked 39th best university in the world in 2014. It is ranked 45th in the 2014 QS World University Rankings and 13th in Europe. Moreover, in 2013, according to the University Ranking by Academic Performance, the University of Copenhagen is the best university in Denmark and the 25th university in the world. The university has had 8 alumni become Nobel laureates and has produced one Turing Award recipient. Wikipedia.


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Sorensen C.S.,Copenhagen University | Syljuasen R.G.,University of Oslo
Nucleic Acids Research | Year: 2012

Mechanisms that preserve genome integrity are highly important during the normal life cycle of human cells. Loss of genome protective mechanisms can lead to the development of diseases such as cancer. Checkpoint kinases function in the cellular surveillance pathways that help cells to cope with DNA damage. Importantly, the checkpoint kinases ATR, CHK1 and WEE1 are not only activated in response to exogenous DNA damaging agents, but are active during normal S phase progression. Here, we review recent evidence that these checkpoint kinases are critical to avoid deleterious DNA breakage during DNA replication in normal, unperturbed cell cycle. Possible mechanisms how loss of these checkpoint kinases may cause DNA damage in S phase are discussed. We propose that the majority of DNA damage is induced as a consequence of deregulated CDK activity that forces unscheduled initiation of DNA replication. This could generate structures that are cleaved by DNA endonucleases leading to the formation of DNA double-strand breaks. Finally, we discuss how these S phase effects may impact on our understanding of cancer development following disruption of these checkpoint kinases, as well as on the potential of these kinases as targets for cancer treatment. © The Author(s) 2011. Published by Oxford University Press.


Piani C.,The American University of Paris | Haerter J.O.,Copenhagen University
Geophysical Research Letters | Year: 2012

In common climate model bias-correction procedures, temperature and precipitation are corrected separately, thereby degrading the dynamical link represented within the model. We propose a methodology that advances the state-of-the-art by correcting not just the 1D intensity distributions separately but the full two-dimensional statistical distribution. To assess the effectiveness of the proposed method, it is applied to the REMO regional climate model output using point measurements of hourly temperature and precipitation from 6 weather stations over Germany as observations. A standard cross-validation is performed by dividing the data into two nonoverlapping 15 year periods. Results show that the methodology effectively improves the temperature-precipitation copula in the validation period, unlike separate 1D temperature and precipitation corrections which, by construction, leave the copula unchanged. An unexpected result is that a relatively small number (<5) of temperature bins are required to achieve significant improvements in the copula. Results are similar for all stations. © 2012. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.


Kliebenstein D.J.,University of California at Davis | Kliebenstein D.J.,Copenhagen University
Current Opinion in Plant Biology | Year: 2014

A goal of metabolic engineering is to take a plant and introduce new or modify existing pathways in a directed and predictable fashion. However, existing data does not provide the necessary level of information to allow for predictive models to be generated. One avenue to reverse engineer the necessary information is to study the genetic control of natural variation in plant primary and secondary metabolism. These studies are showing that any engineering model will have to incorporate information about 1000s of genes in both the nuclear and organellar genome to optimize the function of the introduced pathway. Further, these genes may interact in an unpredictable fashion complicating any engineering approach as it moves from the one or two gene manipulation to higher order stacking efforts. Finally, metabolic engineering may be influenced by a previously unrecognized potential for a plant to measure the metabolites within it. In combination, these observations from natural variation provide a beginning to help improve current efforts at metabolic engineering. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Bergersen L.H.,University of Oslo | Bergersen L.H.,Copenhagen University
Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism | Year: 2015

Lactate acts as a 'buffer' between glycolysis and oxidative metabolism. In addition to being exchanged as a fuel by the monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) between cells and tissues with different glycolytic and oxidative rates, lactate may be a 'volume transmitter' of brain signals. According to some, lactate is a preferred fuel for brain metabolism. Immediately after brain activation, the rate of glycolysis exceeds oxidation, leading to net production of lactate. At physical rest, there is a net efflux of lactate from the brain into the blood stream. But when blood lactate levels rise, such as in physical exercise, there is net influx of lactate from blood to brain, where the lactate is used for energy production and myelin formation. Lactate binds to the lactate receptor GPR81 aka hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor (HCAR1) on brain cells and cerebral blood vessels, and regulates the levels of cAMP. The localization and function of HCAR1 and the three MCTs (MCT1, MCT2, and MCT4) expressed in brain constitute the focus of this review. They are possible targets for new therapeutic drugs and interventions. The author proposes that lactate actions in the brain through MCTs and the lactate receptor underlie part of the favorable effects on the brain resulting from physical exercise. © 2015 ISCBFM All rights reserved.


Zahl P.-H.,Norwegian Institute of Public Health | Gotzsche P.C.,Copenhagen University | Maehlen J.,University of Oslo
The Lancet Oncology | Year: 2011

Background: The natural history of screen-detected breast cancers is not well understood. A previous analysis of the incidence change during the introduction of the Norwegian screening programme in the late 1990s suggested that the natural history of many screen-detected invasive breast cancers is to regress spontaneously but the study was possibly confounded by use of hormone replacement therapy in the population. We did a similar analysis of data collected during an earlier period when few women were exposed to hormone replacement therapy. Methods: We compared cumulative breast cancer incidence in age-matched cohorts of women living in seven Swedish counties before and after the initiation of public mammography screening between 1986 and 1990. Women aged 40-49 years were invited to screening every year and women aged 50-74 years were invited every 2 years. A screened group including all women aged 40-69 years (n=328 927) was followed-up for 6 years after the first invitation to the programme. A control group including all women in the same age range (n=317 404) was also followed-up for 6 years-4 years without screening and 2 years when they entered the screening programme. Screening attendance was much the same in both groups (close to 80%). Counts of incident invasive breast cancers were obtained from the Swedish Cancer Registry (in-situ cancers were excluded). Findings: Before the age-matched controls were invited to be screened at the end of their follow-up period, the 4-year cumulative incidence of invasive breast cancer was significantly higher in the screened group (982 per 100 000) than it was in the control group (658 per 100 000) (relative risk [RR] 1·49, 95% CI 1·41-1·58). Even after prevalence screening in the control group, the screened group had higher 6-year cumulative incidence of invasive breast cancer (1443 per 100 000 vs 1269 per 100 000; RR 1·14, 1·10-1·18). Interpretation: Because the cumulative incidence among controls did not reach that of the screened group, we believe that many invasive breast cancers detected by repeated mammography screening do not persist to be detected by screening at the end of 6 years, suggesting that the natural course of many of the screen-detected invasive breast cancers is to spontaneously regress. Funding: None. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Grinsted A.,Beijing Normal University | Grinsted A.,Copenhagen University
Cryosphere | Year: 2013

I assess the feasibility of using multivariate scaling relationships to estimate glacier volume from glacier inventory data. Scaling laws are calibrated against volume observations optimized for the specific purpose of estimating total global glacier ice volume. I find that adjustments for continentality and elevation range improve skill of area-volume scaling. These scaling relationships are applied to each record in the Randolph Glacier Inventory, which is the first globally complete inventory of glaciers and ice caps. I estimate that the total volume of all glaciers in the world is 0.35 ± 0.07 m sea level equivalent, including ice sheet peripheral glaciers. This is substantially less than a recent state-of-the-art estimate. Area-volume scaling bias issues for large ice masses, and incomplete inventory data are offered as explanations for the difference. © 2013 Author(s).


Field J.K.,University of Liverpool | Oudkerk M.,University of Groningen | Pedersen J.H.,Copenhagen University | Duffy S.W.,Queen Mary, University of London
The Lancet | Year: 2013

Deaths from lung cancer exceed those from any other type of malignancy, with 1·5 million deaths in 2010. Prevention and smoking cessation are still the main methods to reduce the death toll. The US National Lung Screening Trial, which compared CT screening with chest radiograph, yielded a mortality advantage of 20% to participants in the CT group. International debate is ongoing about whether sufficient evidence exists to implement CT screening programmes. When questions about effectiveness and cost-effectiveness have been answered, which will await publication of the largest European trial, NELSON, and pooled analysis of European CT screening trials, we discuss the main topics that will need consideration. These unresolved issues are risk prediction models to identify patients for CT screening; radiological protocols that use volumetric analysis for indeterminate nodules; options for surgical resection of CT-identified nodules; screening interval; and duration of screening. We suggest that a demonstration project of biennial screening over a 4-year period should be undertaken. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Sandvig K.,University of Oslo | Pust S.,University of Oslo | Skotland T.,University of Oslo | van Deurs B.,Copenhagen University
Current Opinion in Cell Biology | Year: 2011

It is now about 20 years since we first wrote reviews about clathrin-independent endocytosis. The challenge at the time was to convince the reader about its existence. Then the suggestion came up that caveolae might be responsible for the uptake. However, clearly this could not be the case since a large fraction of the clathrin-independent uptake is dynamin-independent. Today, two decades later, the field has developed considerably. New techniques have enabled a detailed analysis of several clathrin-independent endocytic mechanisms, and caveolae have been found to be mostly stable structures having several functions of their own. This article aims at providing a brief update on the importance of clathrin-independent endocytic mechanisms, how the processes are regulated differentially, for instance on the poles of polarized cells, and the challenges in studying them. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Rogers J.H.,University of California at Davis | Franzen O.,Copenhagen University
European Heart Journal | Year: 2011

MitraClip therapy consists of percutaneous edge-to-edge coaptation of the mitral leaflets that is analogous to the surgical Alfieri technique. The safety profile of the MitraClip device is favourable, and survival outcomes in high-surgical-risk patients are superior to historical controls. However, questions remain regarding long-term efficacy and durability. In the USA, the MitraClip device has been studied in a safety and feasibility trial, a randomized pivotal trial against surgical mitral valve repair, and a non-randomized high-risk registry. In addition, the MitraClip now has over 2 years of CE-mark approval and a rapidly expanding clinical experience in Europe, primarily in patients at high risk for surgery. A dedicated multidisciplinary team is necessary, as well as thoughtful patient selection, familiarity with the technical aspects of the procedure including transesophageal ultrasound imaging and post-procedure monitoring. Currently available clinical data are herein reviewed, with emphasis on the current role of MitraClip therapy in relation to existing surgical techniques. Since the MitraClip procedure is still relatively new, continued investigation is required to further define patient populations that will benefit most. © 2011 The Author.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: KBBE.2013.3.1-02 | Award Amount: 1.25M | Year: 2013

LATINCROP objectives are to reinforce agrobiodiversity conservation in the Andean region; to identify promising underutilized species for commercial initiatives and improved food security; and to integrate activities into a strong network between relevant stakeholders in Latin America and the EU. The project will identify attractive species for marginal lands involving novel crop combinations thus establishing robust cropping systems. The underutilized species of the Andes are regarded as extremely nutritious and stress tolerant, hence significant components of human culture at present and in the future, with a vital role in the upkeep of sustainable livelihoods and ecosystem stability. Yet, the loss of species, cultivars and wild relatives, and associated traditional knowledge at the farm level, has a noticeable impact on food security of small hold farming communities and their ability to cope with adverse climates. LATINCROP will address the following themes: (A) Environmental - Conservation of agro-biodiversity, (B) Economic - Sustainable development of bio-economy, (C) Social - Improved food security, and (D) Network - Supporting existing activities into network. The project duration is 48 months to be implemented by a team from Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, Denmark, UK and Spain. The project takes stock of related past and on-going projects and will complement them in an integrative approach to obtain long-term results leading to increased food security, on the selected crops among seed, roots and tubers. The principal expected outcome is the strengthening of the conservation of the Andean agrobiodiversity for food security and global bioeconomy. We will improve sustainable use of agrobiodiversity by developing underutilized crops, supporting economic development in Latin America while ensuring mutual interest and benefit with the EU, and creating a network to facilitate transfer of knowledge and technology related to the promotion of underutilized Andean species.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-33-2015 | Award Amount: 30.12M | Year: 2016

The vision of EU-ToxRisk is to drive a paradigm shift in toxicology towards an animal-free, mechanism-based integrated approach to chemical safety assessment. The project will unite all relevant disciplines and stakeholders to establish: i) pragmatic, solid read-across procedures incorporating mechanistic and toxicokinetic knowledge; and ii) ab initio hazard and risk assessment strategies of chemicals with little background information. The project will focus on repeated dose systemic toxicity (liver, kidney, lung and nervous system) as well as developmental/reproduction toxicity. Different human tiered test systems are integrated to balance speed, cost and biological complexity. EU-ToxRisk extensively integrates the adverse outcome pathway (AOP)-based toxicity testing concept. Therefore, advanced technologies, including high throughput transcriptomics, RNA interference, and high throughput microscopy, will provide quantitative and mechanistic underpinning of AOPs and key events (KE). The project combines in silico tools and in vitro assays by computational modelling approaches to provide quantitative data on the activation of KE of AOP. This information, together with detailed toxicokinetics data, and in vitro-in vivo extrapolation algorithms forms the basis for improved hazard and risk assessment. The EU-ToxRisk work plan is structured along a broad spectrum of case studies, driven by the cosmetics, (agro)-chemical, pharma industry together with regulators. The approach involves iterative training, testing, optimization and validation phases to establish fit-for-purpose integrated approaches to testing and assessment with key EU-ToxRisk methodologies. The test systems will be combined to a flexible service package for exploitation and continued impact across industry sectors and regulatory application. The proof-of-concept for the new mechanism-based testing strategy will make EU-ToxRisk the flagship in Europe for animal-free chemical safety assessment.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-04-2015 | Award Amount: 6.83M | Year: 2016

Environmental heating is a growing challenge for our community and problems are already experienced by millions of Europeans during the summertime and aggravated during heat waves or occupational settings. In addition to the well-known health risks related to severe heat stress, a number of studies have confirmed significant loss of productivity due to hyperthermia. Even if countries adopt the EU proposal for limiting global CO2 emissions, climate change and its associated threat to public health will continue for many decades. Thus, it is crucial to develop strategies to mitigate the detrimental health and societal effects of these environmental changes. Stakeholders such as policy makers and the private sector usually lack the technical capabilities or facilities to conduct R&D activities at the level of excellence required for such development. European research institutes have the capacity to conduct the R&D necessary to develop solutions. However, they often lack the capacity to transform these solutions into policies and assess their health, economic and social benefits. The HEAT-SHIELD project will create a sustainable inter-sector framework that will promote health as well as productivity for European citizens in the context of global warming. The project will produce a series of state-of-the-art innovative outcomes including: (i) appropriate technical and biophysical research-based solutions to be implemented when the ambient temperature poses a health threat or impairs productivity (ii) a weather-based warning system with online open access service that anticipates the events that may pose a threat to workers health; (iii) scenario-specific policies and solutions aimed at health promotion and preventing loss of productivity (iv) implementation of the formulated policies and evaluation of their health, economic and social benefits. Consequently, the HEAT-SHIELD project provides a multi-sector approach to address the serious environmental challenge.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP-2007-2.2-1 | Award Amount: 27.17M | Year: 2009

The call 4.2.2-1 organic materials for electronics and photonics is based on the observation that the limited availability of high-performance multi-functional materials is a roadblock to further industrial progress. To address the wide scope of the call, we have identified specific materials bottlenecks to the fields of electronics and photonics. They constitute the focal points of our project. One-P main objective is: to invent, design, synthesize, characterize, process, and to supply the missing materials in the fields of organic electronics and photonics and to develop appropriate patterning methods for micro- and nano-structuring of these materials that can be up-scaled to roll-to-roll technologies. The work plan is composed of five technical workpackages, each one addressing current materials challenges: 1) charge transport and injection, 2) detection and sensing, 3) light emission, 4) functional self-assembled monolayers, 5) continuous processing and technology. Computer-aided design of materials and the use of advanced characterization tools are transversal activities that are integrated in technical workpackages. The sixth workpackage is devoted to dissemination, exploitation, and management of intellectual properties that are essential for the project success. To carry out this multi-disciplinary project, a cross-sectorial consortium has been formed at the European level. It is composed of strong academic and industrial teams with necessary and complementary expertises to cover all scientific, technological and exploitation aspects. The project will generate fundamental knowledge and help to develop unprecedented technologies. They will have a positive impact on competitiveness of European industries, environment, job creation, health, security, safety, and welfare of European citizens


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: NERC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 1.82M | Year: 2015

The impacts of climate change, and warming in particular, on natural ecosystems remain poorly understood, and research to date has focused on individual species (e.g. range shifts of polar bears). Multispecies systems (food webs, ecosystems), however, can possess emergent properties that can only be understood using a system-level perspective. Within a given food web, the microbial world is the engine that drives key ecosystem processes, biogeochemical cycles (e.g. the carbon-cycle) and network properties, but has been hidden from view due to difficulties with identifying which microbes are present and what they are doing. The recent revolution in Next Generation Sequencing has removed this bottleneck and we can now open the microbial black box to characterise the metagenome (who is there?) and metatranscriptome (what are they doing?) of the community for the first time. These advances will allow us to address a key overarching question: should we expect a global response to global warming? There are bodies of theory that suggest this might be the case, including the Metabolic Theory of Ecology and the Everything is Everywhere hypothesis of global microbial biogeography, yet these ideas have yet to be tested rigorously at appropriate scales and in appropriate experimental contexts that allow us to identify patterns and causal relationships in real multispecies systems. We will assess the impacts of warming across multiple levels of biological organisation, from genes to food webs and whole ecosystems, using geothermally warmed freshwaters in 5 high-latitude regions (Svalbard, Iceland, Greenland, Alaska, Kamchatka), where warming is predicted to be especially rapid,. Our study will be the first to characterise the impacts of climate change on multispecies systems at such an unprecedented scale. Surveys of these sentinel systems will be complemented with modelling and experiments conducted in these field sites, as well as in 100s of large-scale mesocosms (artificial streams and ponds) in the field and 1,000s of microcosms of robotically-assembled microbial communities in the laboratory. Our novel genes-to-ecosystems approach will allow us to integrate measures of biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. For instance, we will quantify key functional genes as well as quantifying which genes are switched on (the metatranscriptome) in addition to measuring ecosystem functioning (e.g. processes related to the carbon cycle). We will also measure the impacts of climate change on the complex networks of interacting species we find in nature - what Darwin called the entangled bank - because food webs and other types of networks can produce counterintuitive responses that cannot be predicted from studying species in isolation. One general objective is to assess the scope for biodiversity insurance and resilience of natural systems in the face of climate change. We will combine our intercontinental surveys with natural experiments, bioassays, manipulations and mathematical models to do this. For instance, we will characterise how temperature-mediated losses to biodiversity can compromise key functional attributes of the gene pool and of the ecosystem as a whole. There is an assumption in the academic literature and in policy that freshwater ecosystems are relatively resilient because the apparently huge scope for functional redundancy could allow for compensation for species loss in the face of climate change. However, this has not been quantified empirically in natural systems, and errors in estimating the magnitude of functional redundancy could have substantial environmental and economic repercussions. The research will address a set of key specific questions and hypotheses within our 5 themed Workpackages, of broad significance to both pure and applied ecology, and which also combine to provide a more holistic perspective than has ever been attempted previously.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 4.16M | Year: 2013

The FlowTrans Initial Training Network is a unique environment for career development, built on joint challenges of Industry and University partners in a newly emerging supra-disciplinary field, spanning from Physics to Earth Sciences and aiming to understand Flow in Transforming Porous Media. Training will be hosted by 8 Universities in synergy with 2 full and 4 associated industry partners with the objective of delivering highly-trained mobile researchers to the European market. The objective of FlowTrans is the creation of a unique research training environment and a new inter-sectoral supra-interdisciplinary field to de-fragment European knowledge and combine industry and universities to harness understanding of basic scientific questions for tackling future challenges in Exploration of Geological Resources. Our research training objectives focus on teaching ESRs and ERs the necessary interdisciplinary skills needed to study Flow in Transforming Porous Media. The characterization and the understanding of flow of fluids within rocks and granular media has become an ever-increasing problem in Earth Sciences, Physics, and in many industrial applications, including CO2 sequestration, hydrocarbon migration, ore deposit development, and radioactive waste disposal. One of the main problems is the understanding of flows in transforming porous media (PM), where the rocks and fluid pathways evolve spatially and temporally, for example due to chemical interactions with the flow, or due to compaction of the solid matrix. We propose to study the feedback mechanisms and their impact on the porous media through an interdisciplinary approach between Earth Scientists and Physicists. State of the art analytical and experimental methods will be used on natural systems and rock analogues, and will be complemented by multi-scale dynamical simulations, to develop new basic understanding and new methods that can be directly used in industrial applications.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENV.2011.3.1.9-1 | Award Amount: 6.39M | Year: 2012

INBIOSOIL is a timely project that proposes novel eco-efficient environmentally friendly technologies substantially contributing to the reduced input of conventional chemical pesticides for the control of subterranean crop pests of global economic importance. This would be accomplished through the generation of new formulations of biological control agents (BCAs) based on entomopathogenic fungi and nematodes within integrated pest management strategies. The strategies exploit synergies between BCAs which result in higher pest mortality. The proposed strategies: (1) contribute to reduced pesticide inputs in sustainable agricultural-horticultural systems, (2) offer potential savings for growers, (3) promote biodiversity and (4) offer solutions for both organic and conventional growers, thus ensuring the competitiveness of European growers. INBIOSOIL also includes risk assessment studies which should accelerate registration of new BCA products. The goals will be accomplished through 5 complementary work packages carried out by 15 European partners. The experienced, multidisciplinary team includes researchers from academia and SMEs. The project meets the challenges of globalization, climate change, and new plant protection policies leading to the production of high-quality and safer crops; it is in accordance with the scope of the Eco-Innovation call FP7-ENV-2011-3.1.9.-1. INBIOSOIL contributes to implementation of EC regulation 1107/2009 and Directive 2009/128/EC which make it obligatory for EU Member States to implement principles of IPM with priority being given to non-chemical methods of integrated pest management. INBIOSOIL addresses direct and indirect impacts, as well as primary and secondary effects, and clearly demonstrates a substantial improvement of the sustainability performance of BCAs along the entire life cycle of the proposed solutions and considers rebound effects with respect to currently available state-of-the-art technologies or solutions.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2014 | Award Amount: 499.50K | Year: 2015

Compared to meals prepared at home, meals eaten out tend to contain more calories, total fat and saturated fat and it is here where the consumer has very little control or knowledge of the nutrient profile of the food they are eating (Bohm and Quartuccio, 2008). The positive association between the rise in consumption of food prepared outside the home and the increasing prevalence of obesity has been described as a major health and wellbeing societal challenge. Attempts to increase public awareness of appropriate ways to eat more healthily unfortunately do not seem to have led to significant changes in patterns of food purchase and consumption especially from an eating out-of-home situation. It has become obvious that the development of effective measures for improvement requires further systematic research and a radical approach. The aim of FoodSMART is to develop an innovative technical (ICT) menu solution that enables informed consumer choice when eating out that takes into account individual characteristics (such as culture, dietary requirements and age group) as well as product (specification) and environmental cues (choice architecture and consumption setting). This aim will be achieved through the evaluation of consumer orientated intelligence (what information consumers require/trust i.e. information quality); the assessment of industry orientated intelligence (impact of customisation) and the subsequent development of data analytics and Quick Recognition (QR) coding for personalised food recommendation; thereby, facilitating the consumption of healthy and appropriate dishes. Results will be gathered and modelled to provide strategic intelligence for menu design and decision-making (by Industry) and for policy purposes (by the EU); further, this translational research will be disseminated both at scientific and consumer levels. Increasing the pace and scale of innovation within out-of-home eating is fundamental to this proposal.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE-2009-1-2-04 | Award Amount: 7.82M | Year: 2010

SOLIBAM will develop specific and novel breeding approaches integrated with management practices to improve the performance, quality, sustainability and stability of crops adapted to organic and low-input systems, in their diversity in Europe and taking into account small-scale farms in Africa. SOLIBAM will: 1. Identify traits specific for adaptation to low-input/organic conditions over a wide range of agro-climatic conditions in Europe 2. Develop efficient phenotyping, genotyping and molecular tools to monitor heritable variation during selection. Molecular analysis of functional polymorphisms will increase accuracy in breeding methodologies and improve monitoring of genetic diversity and adaptation along generations. It will also increase the understanding of adaptive phenomena 3. Develop the use of within-crop diversity to stabilise yield and quality in the face of current and increasing variation in organic and low-input agriculture 4. Design, develop and test innovative arable and vegetable cropping systems based on integration of a high level of diversification in crop management with the use of genetically diverse populations or varieties 5. Compare the effectiveness of different breeding strategies under conventional, low input and certified organic farming to set up optimal strategies for the production of varieties suitable for organic and low input farming taking into account the traits which are avoided in conventional breeding 6. Develop methodologies for farmers participatory research that exploit SOLIBAMs advances in low-input and organic farming 7. Quantify the effects and interactions of breeding and management innovations on crop nutritional, organoleptic and end-use quality 8. Evaluate socio-economic and environmental impacts of SOLIBAM breeding and management innovations in order to identify farm business, consumer preference, food supply and legislation related issues that are likely to influence their adoption


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE-2009-2-1-01 | Award Amount: 3.82M | Year: 2010

HabEat will bring together 11 European partners from 6 European countries with a multidisciplinary approach (psychology, epidemiology, behavioural science, nutrition, sensory science) to enable a key breakthrough in the understanding of how food habits are formed (and can also be changed) in infants and young children. This will be done by combining epidemiologic studies based on existing human cohorts from 4 countries and experimental work carried out in 6 countries so as to collaboratively identify: - the critical periods in the formation/breaking of food habits - the key learning mechanisms, their relative impact in the short, mid and long term and their importance according to the different critical periods - the most effective strategies for breaking habits, i.e. for changing from poor to healthy habits - Individual reactions to the learning mechanisms and individual susceptibility to changes Furthermore the project will work hand-in-hand with a board of stakeholder advisors (including industry, health professionals) to produce guidelines on the recommendations that should be communicated to childcare professionals and parents from different target groups (especially those most at risk) in different EU regions. HabEat will also propose strategies to policy makers for promoting practices to ensure healthy food habits in young infants and children as well as intervention strategies for enabling habit breaking taking into account individual differences and parental feeding strategies.


The CRYDIS exchange programme will establish and support international and inter-sectoral transfer of knowledge and expertise in pharmaceutical and instrument science between several EU research institutes and industrial companies. It will also enhance understanding of the value of inter-sectoral exchange mechanisms for taking research to market. CRYDIS undertakes innovative, collaborative research on the clinically-important topic of dissolution of drug substance particles in bio-relevant media and the undesired subsequent nucleation and re-precipitation of the drug prior to its absorption. Using innovative advances in UV imaging technology, CRYDIS investigates the utility of novel dissolution assays as key tools to obtain fundamental data on the mechanism and kinetics of undesired nucleation and re-precipitation during or following dissolution, a significant problem for the pharmaceutical industry which struggles to obtain sufficient exposure to poorly soluble drug substances to ensure an effective dose is absorbed by the patient. The key technologies in this proposal offer a step change in capability and functionality, offering the potential to undertake more detailed studies of the dissolution/re-precipitation processes relevant to pharmaceutical materials. Access to this key technology and the further development of its capability offers the potential for breakthroughs in development of process understanding and of robust and widely applicable protocols. Additional value is brought to CRYDIS through close working with synergistic European networks, leveraging a greater knowledge input and impact outreach. Running parallel with the science programme, an innovation management work-package analyses effectiveness of the exchange mechanism in building a shared culture, transferring knowledge and developing understanding of processes that drive a product to market. The outcomes of this will be used to advise and drive potential future exchange activities.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2011.1.2-09 | Award Amount: 6.51M | Year: 2012

The MSY concept was included as a principle in the 2009 Green Paper on the reform of the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) in accordance with the global imperative to manage fish stocks according to the maximum sustainable yield (MSY). This implies a commitment to direct management of fish stocks towards achieving MSY by 2015. Attaining this goal is complicated by the lack of common agreement on the interpretation of sustainability and yield and by the effects that achieving MSY for one stock may have on other stocks and broader ecosystem, economic, or social aspects. MYFISH will provide definitions of MSY variants which maximize other measures of yield than biomass and which account for the fact that single species rarely exist in isolation. Further, MYFISH will redefine the term sustainable to signify that Good Environmental Status (MSFD) is achieved and economically and socially unacceptable situations are avoided, all with acceptable levels of risk. In short, MYFISH aims at integrating the MSY concept with the overarching principals of the CFP: the precautionary and the ecosystem approach. MYFISH will achieve this objective through addressing fisheries in all RAC areas and integrating stakeholders (the fishing industry, NGOs and managers) throughout the project. Existing ecosystem and fisheries models will be modified to perform maximization of stakeholder approved yield measures while ensuring acceptable impact levels on ecosystem, economic and social aspects. Implementation plans are proposed and social aspects addressed through active involvement of stakeholders. Finally, effects of changes in environment, economy and society on MSY variants are considered, aiming at procedures rendering the MSY approach robust to such changes. The expertise of 26 partners from relevant disciplines including fisheries, ecosystem, economic and social science are involved in all aspects of the project. Global experience is engaged from North America and the South Pacific.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2011.1.2-10 | Award Amount: 3.83M | Year: 2012

SOCIOEC is an interdisciplinary, European wide project bringing together scientists from several fisheries sciences with industry partners and other key stakeholders to work in an integrated manner on solutions for future fisheries management, that can be implemented at a regional level. The central concept is to provide a mechanism for developing measures that are consistent with the overarching sustainability objectives of the EU, and that can provide consensus across all stakeholders. The first step will be to develop a coherent and consistent set of management objectives, which will address ecological; economic and social sustainability targets. The objectives should be consistent with the aims of the CFP, MSFD and other EU directives, but they should also be understandable by the wider stakeholder community and engage their support. This will then lead to the proposal of a number of potential management measures, based on existing or new approaches. The second step will be to analyze the incentives for compliance provided by these measures. In particular, we will examine fishers responses and perceptions of these measures, based on historical analysis as well as direct consultation and interviews. This project part will also examine how the governance can be changed to facilitate self- and co-management to ensure fisher buy-in to promising management measures. In particular, the project will focus on the interpretation of overarching (i.e. EU) objectives in local and regional contexts. Finally, the project will examine the impacts of the management measures that emerge from this process, particularly in terms of their economic and social impacts. The IA analysis will be integrated by evaluating the proposed measures against the criteria of effectiveness, efficiency and coherence. Special attention will be paid in evaluating the proposed management measures performance in terms of their ability to achieve the general and specific ecological objectives.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-EJD | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-EJD | Award Amount: 4.07M | Year: 2016

ArchSci2020 will provide structured state-of-the-art doctoral training to the next generation of archaeologists and biomolecular scientists forging a new generation of biomolecular archaeologists. Few other academic disciplines have been so transformed in the last decade as Archaeology. ArchSci2020 meet the need of a new generation of researchers. International, intersectoral and interdisciplinary training will equip its early-stage researchers (ESRs) with specific research-related and transferable skills, in order to provide enhanced career prospects across academia, industry and the third sector. The proposed ArchSci2020 network will bring together four leading research clusters each with complementary expertise to deliver an integrated, flexible training package that will provide a sound basis for academic independence and preparation for vocations in the archaeology, heritage and beyond. ArchSci2020 will combine (i) a common purpose, (ii) an unconditional commitment to the student experience, (iii) a pro-active stance towards international, inter-institutional research support and interdisciplinary study, (iv) a simple but effective management structure provided by a Management Team, Supervisory Committee and the Work Package leaders, (v) and an established academic infrastructure and reputation. Key features of ArchSci2020: 1. ArchSci2020 will create a multidisciplinary training environment that brings together archaeologists, biologists, mathematicians, analytical chemists, and policy experts around an archaeological hub. 2. ArchSci2020 priorities and cross-cutting training themes align closely with Grand Challenges across its themes of Health, Diet, and Environment and incorporates the important current skills and future training needs in archaeological science. 3. Each participating institution will make a unique and distinct contribution to the experience of Early Stage Researchers (ESRs) in a partnership formed from existing strong environments.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IRSES | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2010-IRSES | Award Amount: 188.80K | Year: 2012

54 partners from 34 institutes have formed an EC-funded Network of Excellence (NoE) in basic malaria research, the European Virtual Institute for Malaria Research (EVIMalaR). Over the previous >5 years as the NoE Biomalpar these partners successfully broke down many barriers to cooperation pursuing a programme of integrated research. This was greatly assisted by the Biomalpar PhD School whose students were supervised by two partners from different member states. Evimalar represents the latest incarnation of this network and has recruited in tranches 21 students into the Evimalar PhD School. Australian malaria researchers have also realised the greater benefits of collaborative research and within the Australian Parasitology Network have exchanged personnel and expertise. Both the European and Australian networks recognised that their domestic spirit of cooperation could be mutualised and signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) in 2007 (updated in 2010) to formalise the ambition. The MoU generated greater exchange between the regions but was limited due to lack of finance. Evimalar created a legal link between the regions by incorporating an Australian malaria researcher who was then applied for funding from the Australian NHMRC to finance OzEMalaR, a mechanism for exchange of Australians to Evimalar partners. Ozmalnet seeks reciprocal funding to allow Evimalar researchers to conduct exchange visits to OzEMalaR laboratories. Both regions are world leaders in malaria research with particular local strengths that can be exploited to the mutual benefit of both regions and their early stage researchers including Evimalar PhD students who will primarily be undertaking the exchanges. The outcome will be a more globalised integration of malaria research and greater exchange of information and personnel in the future leading to collaborative grants and ultimately concerted efforts to defeat malaria one of the greatest scourges of mankind.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: FETOPEN-1-2014 | Award Amount: 3.57M | Year: 2015

CHROMAVISION aims to develop a pioneering chromosome imaging and manipulation platform that will fuel the next decades of structural chromosome research. Chromosomal abnormalities are characteristic of many disorders such as cancer, impaired fertility due to maternal aging, and neurological disorders such as fragile X syndrome. If humanity is to fully understand the wide range of diseases that are associated to errors in cell division, we must be able to further zoom in on healthy and diseased chromosomes in all their complexity. The CHROMAVISION platform will allow molecular biologists to automatically isolate individual chromosomes from small tissue or cell samples and have these delivered to a super-resolution microscope. Chromosome isolation and delivery is achieved by an opto-fluidic chip that is able to trap, visualise and lyse individual cells and separate metaphase chromosomes from cell lysate. Single chromosomes can be hand-selected and brought into focus of the Super-Resolution Correlative Tweezers Fluorescence Microscope (CTFM-SR3D) that is developed in CHROMAVISION. This instrument will for the first time enable 3D, super-resolution, real-time metaphase chromosome observation and manipulation studies under near-physiological conditions. The technique will push the boundaries of what is currently possible in microfluidics and super-resolution microscopy and combine these into a single powerful approach for chromosome studies. Furthermore, the platform will be applied in CHROMAVISION to address key challenges in clinical and fundamental chromosome research, potentially resulting in breakthrough discoveries. Better imaging and understanding of the chromosomal mechanisms will contribute to our knowledge of the etiology of human diseases and aid drug discovery. The platform will also have large clinical value, allowing identification and monitoring of e.g. cancer heterogeneity.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN | Award Amount: 4.23M | Year: 2013

The MedPlant network will train young researchers in career enhancing approaches and techniques in biodiversity driven drug lead discovery, complimentary and entrepreneurial skills relevant for work in the pharmaceutical industry, regulatory bodies, NGOs and academia. The aim is to improve the students chances of employment and to strengthen Europes research base through a collaborative training network, whose capacities greatly exceed those of each individual partner institution. MedPlant will familiarise the students with a range of state-of-the-art methodologies in biodiversity driven lead discovery, and provide cross-disciplinary and intersectorial training through network-wide training activities, collaborations and secondments. Researchers will also learn to address scientific and non-scientific audiences by dissemination and outreach activities. The scientific aim of MedPlant is to develop new approaches and technologies for selection and sustainable use of biodiversity resources for lead discovery and to develop new plant derived leads. MedPlant consists of leading European research groups, private companies, and public and non-public organisations with complimentary knowledge in this area. Collectively the partners posess critical mass of expertise needed to provide excellent training in biodiversity driven lead discovery. The number of new drugs coming to the market is declining and interest in lead discovery from natural resources is seeing a revival. However, although methods for isolation and identification of natural products have advanced explosively in recent decades, methods for selection of potential leads have hardly developed. Hence, training of a new generation of researchers in the proposed innovative field of biodiversity driven lead discovery is both timely and relevant, as it will contribute directly to the economic development and future welfare of Europe and will significantly enhance the employment prospects of the participants.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-ITN-2008 | Award Amount: 4.61M | Year: 2009

Chromatin packages a few meters of DNA into a nucleus measuring a few microns. This tight folding occurs by assembling DNA with histones into so-called nucleosomes, thus ensuring the mechanical stability of our genome. On the flipside, this makes nucleosomes a formidable obstacle to the machines that read, copy or repair its DNA message. One of the fundamental questions in biology is to understand how nucleosome structure is established, maintained and manipulated. Our Marie Curie Initial Training Network will carry out multidisciplinary, collaborative research projects focused on deciphering nucleosome structure and function in space and time (Nucleosome4D). Our main objective is to provide our young researchers with world-class research & training in nucleosome biology. We will use cutting-edge, interdisciplinary methods and collaborative projects to determine how nucleosomes are remodeled during transcription, when genes are silenced, as cell divide, as stem cells differentiate, during organismal development and in human disease. We utilize state-of-the-art approaches in structural biology, biophysics, cell biology, live-cell imaging, biochemistry, genetics, genomics and bioinformatics. We will implement a comprehensive training plan for scientific and career development using the best local approaches to research & training, by promoting exchanges, using the advise of our industrial partners and three Visiting Scientists, by sharing reagents and expertise, as well as through a structured set of scientific workshops and complementary skills training courses. Together, our effort will ensure the multidisciplinary and intersectorial training of a new cohort of young European researchers. This will allow our trainees to take the opportunities and meet the challenges of a successful career in the life science sector through excellent training, effective communication, great teamwork and proven project management skills.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 3.80M | Year: 2012

DNA is tightly wrapped around histones to form chromatin, a highly dynamic structure that can adopt different conformations with contrasting degrees of compaction. Essential processes of DNA metabolism, such as DNA repair, replication or transcription operate in the context of chromatin and higher order chromosomal organization. Understanding how modulation of chromatin structure and repair influence cell fate decisions in development and disease or how genome surveillance factors interact with the chromatin structure to safeguard the genome is an emerging question that represents a major challenge for human health. The objectives of the aDDRess ITN are: 1. to establish a European research platform of excellence in the proposed field, 2. to create a Network dedicated for the training of ESR/ERs promoting their independent careers and prospects and 3. to transform our current collaborations into a stronger intellectual and training network with links to the industry. In addressing these aims, we have put forward a multidisciplinary approach to study this central thematic area at the molecular, cellular and systems level by assembling a group of scientists with cross disciplinary expertise and capabilities. This integrated approach is likely to provide a solid groundwork on genome maintenance and chromatin dynamics driven by DNA damage.


The direct dependence of humans on ecosystem services is by far strongest in developing regions where poverty restricts access to resources. This dependency also makes people in developing countries more sensitive to climate change than their developed counterparts. Increasing human populations deteriorates natural habitat, biodiversity and ecosystems services which spiral into poverty and low human welfare. This calls for innovative solutions that encompass the entire socio-ecological-economic system, as recognized on a global scale in the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. However, innovative and practical solutions require downscaling to regional levels for identifying concrete sets of drivers of change. For Africa specifically, the interplay of human population growth, land use change, climate change and human well-being is a major challenge. This project focuses on the Serengeti-Maasai Mara Ecosystem and associated agricultural areas, a region in East Africa that encompasses parts of Kenya and Tanzania. The ecosystem is world-famous for key aspects of its biodiversity, such as the migration of 1.3 million wildebeest. This flagship ecosystem role will enhance the international interest in the project. In this project, internationally leading researchers from Norway, the Netherlands, Scotland, Denmark and Germany are teaming up with strong local partners in Tanzania and Kenya. The research will be organised in seven interlinked work packages: 1) assemble and integrate the so far separate Kenyan and Tanzanian relevant data on the region; 2) quantify the connections between human population growth, land use change, climate change and biodiversity change; 3) test how biodiversity change leads to changes in key ecosystem services; 4) quantify the dependence of human livelihoods on these ecosystem services. We will implement innovative ways for communication and dissemination of the results of continuous engagement by local stakeholders.


The EURAXESS TOP III consortium includes partners from almost all EURAXESS countries (either as beneficiaries or associated partners, from altogether 39 countries), in order to ensure the widest possible coverage as well as increased impact. The project has been divided into eight work packages. Two WPs are devoted to the development, testing and pilot introduction of new services on career development within the EURAXESS network. The remaining WPs will focus on the environment of researchers including the institutional context, the integration of third country researchers and reaching out to researchers beyond the EU; researchers within and outside academia, most notably industry; the consolidation of the ongoing services portfolio, be it personal or electronic; the further capacity building of the EURAXESS network members and meeting the challenge posed by staff turnover by trainings, twinning and study visits; networking and knowledge exchange with a wide range of other networks; implementation of a consistent quality assurance and monitoring system operating on several levels on the project, and working out a future vision for EURAXESS in light of the policy goals of the EC set for the period up to 2020. The project will significantly contribute to matching research talents with R&I needs and capacity on a European scale and it will help the circulation of researchers within Europe and among sectors. As a result of the project, members of the EURAXESS network will have better and broader knowledge and more integrated good practices regarding service provision for researchers. EURAXESS national portals throughout the EURAXESS member countries will offer tailor made information in line with Horizon 2020 objectives on making science careers attractive for researchers, especially young researchers.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: NERC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 1.47M | Year: 2015

Concerns are growing about how much melting occurs on the surface of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS), and how much this melting will contribute to sea level rise (1). It seems that the amount of melting is accelerating and that the impact on sea level rise is over 1 mm each year (2). This information is of concern to governmental policy makers around the world because of the risk to viability of populated coastal and low-lying areas. There is currently a great scientific need to predict the amount of melting that will occur on the surface of the GrIS over the coming decades (3), since the uncertainties are high. The current models which are used to predict the amount of melting in a warmer climate rely heavily on determining the albedo, the ratio of how reflective the snow cover and the ice surface are to incoming solar energy. Surfaces which are whiter are said to have higher albedo, reflect more sunlight and melt less. Surfaces which are darker adsorb more sunlight and so melt more. Just how the albedo varies over time depends on a number of factors, including how wet the snow and ice is. One important factor that has been missed to date is bio-albedo. Each drop of water in wet snow and ice contains thousands of tiny microorganisms, mostly algae and cyanobacteria, which are pigmented - they have a built in sunblock - to protect them from sunlight. These algae and cyanobacteria have a large impact on the albedo, lowering it significantly. They also glue together dust particles that are swept out of the air by the falling snow. These dust particles also contain soot from industrial activity and forest fires, and so the mix of pigmented microbes and dark dust at the surface produces a darker ice sheet. We urgently need to know more about the factors that lead to and limit the growth of the pigmented microbes. Recent work by our group in the darkest zone of the ice sheet surface in the SW of Greenland shows that the darkest areas have the highest numbers of cells. Were these algae to grow equally well in other areas of the ice sheet surface, then the rate of melting of the whole ice sheet would increase very quickly. A major concern is that there will be more wet ice surfaces for these microorganisms to grow in, and for longer, during a period of climate warming, and so the microorganisms will grow in greater numbers and over a larger area, lowering the albedo and increasing the amount of melt that occurs each year. The nutrient - plant food - that the microorganisms need comes from the ice crystals and dust on the ice sheet surface, and there are fears that increased N levels in snow and ice may contribute to the growth of the microorganisms. This project aims to be the first to examine the growth and spread of the microorganisms in a warming climate, and to incorporate biological darkening into models that predict the future melting of the GrIS. References 1. Sasgen I and 8 others. Timing and origin of recent regional ice-mass loss in Greenland. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 333-334, 293-303(2012). 2. Rignot, E., Velicogna, I., van den Broeke, M. R., Monaghan, A. & Lenaerts, J. Acceleration of the contribution of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets to sea level rise. Geophys. Res. Lett. 38, L05503, doi:10.1029/2011gl046583 (2011). 3. Milne, G. A., Gehrels, W. R., Hughes, C. W. & Tamisiea, M. E. Identifying the causes of sea-level change. Nature Geosci 2, 471-478 (2009).


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INFRADEV-3-2015 | Award Amount: 19.94M | Year: 2015

The science of materials has always been at the centre of scientific and technological progress in human development. The tools to understand materials that fashion them to meet our societal needs have been just as important. Thermal neutrons are one of the most powerful probes that look directly at the structure and dynamics of materials from the macro- to the microscopic scale and from nano-seconds to seconds. It is therefore natural that a group of 17 European Partner Countries have joined together to construct the worlds most powerful neutron source, the European Spallation Source (ESS). The importance of ESS has been recognised by ESFRI who have prioritised it as one of three Research Infrastructures (RIs) for this INFRADEV-3 call. However, simply constructing the most powerful spallation neutron source will not, by itself, ensure the maximum scientific or technological impact. What is needed is an integrated program that ensures that key challenges are met in order to build an ESS that can deliver high impact scientific and technological knowledge. With a timeline of 36 months, involving 18 Consortium Partners and a budget of 19.941.964, the BrightnESS proposal will ensure that (A) the extensive knowledge and skills of European companies, and institutes, are best deployed in the form of In-Kind Contributions to ESS for its construction and operation, (B) that technology transfer both to, and from, the ESS to European institutions and companies is optimised and, (C) that the maximum technical performance is obtained from the ESS target, moderators and detectors in order to deliver world class science and insights for materials technology and innovation.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 3.90M | Year: 2013

The CO2-REACT ITN has been created to address twin objectives: (1) to provide urgently needed training in CO2 storage preparing candidates for critical roles in the coming years and (2) to significantly advance our understanding of the fate and consequences of CO2 injection into the subsurface during carbon storage efforts. The CO2-REACT ITN addresses these objectives through a balanced combination of 6 academic and 6 industrial teams. The academic partners have been selected for their unique and diverse expertise in the reactivity of carbonate phases at scales ranging from the atomic to the field scale. The six industry partners were selected to represent a spectrum of the largest stakeholders in CO2 storage. By formally joining these teams, we are creating a training/research platform that is unique in the world in its ability to understand the fate and consequences of CO2 injected into subsurface reservoirs using an impressive array of experimental and modeling techniques. CO2-REACT aims to train 13 ESRs and 1 ER, through an integrated and coherent set of research and training activities that will significantly improve our understanding of the consequences of injecting CO2 into the subsurface. We chose this technical focus because: (1) new knowledge is essential for solving a critical societal problem, (2) the problem is interdisciplinary, requiring input from chemistry, geology, physics, chemistry, hydrology and engineering, (3) producing solutions that industry can implement will promote tight academia-industry collaboration, a true plus for the trainees and and 4) by focusing on a single theme, close interaction and collaboration among the CO2-REACT teams is fostered. An additional societal objective of CO2-REACT is help to raise public awareness to the needs, challenges and safety issues in subsurface CO2 storage through public outreach efforts.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENV.2013.6.2-5 | Award Amount: 7.21M | Year: 2013

GREEN SURGE will identify, develop and test ways of connecting green spaces, biodiversity, people and the green economy, in order to meet the major urban challenges related to land use conflicts, climate change adaptation, demographic changes, and human health and wellbeing. It will provide a sound evidence base for green infrastructure planning and implementation, exploring the innovation potential, and linking environmental, social and economic services with local communities. Working from the local to the city-regional level, the project aims to: 1) Develop urban green infrastructure as a planning concept for both integration and promotion of biodiversity and ecosystem services, and adapt it to local contexts; 2) apply an innovative biocultural diversity perspective to develop successful governance arrangements facilitating socio-ecological integration and local engagement in planning of urban green spaces; and 3) explore how valuation and real market integration of biodiversity and ecosystem services can facilitate choices in favour of the development of multifunctional green spaces in urban areas. Approaches and tools under these three interlinked objectives will be developed and implemented through an integrative, iterative and transdisciplinary process. GREEN SURGE will embrace a three-tiered approach of comparative European cases, synthesis of good practices, and establishment of five Urban Learning Labs strategically selected to represent different urban situations in Europe. GREEN SURGE will work within cooperative Learning Alliances, a specific type of multi-stakeholder involvement designed to enhance a process of shared learning and understanding in situations with a high degree of complexity and un-predictability. Two-loop learning applied combines a project-wide science-driven approach based on a common framework methodology with a bottom-up knowledge or experience-based approach at the local level.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: KBBE.2012.1.4-03 | Award Amount: 544.12K | Year: 2012

The aim of ADVANZ (Advocacy for Neglected Zoonotic Diseases) is to persuade decision makers and empower stakeholders at local, regional, and international levels towards a coordinated fight against neglected zoonotic diseases (NZD), first and foremost in Africa, where the burden from NZD are heaviest. If the battle against NZD is going to be won, a major part of the initiative must come through a behaviour change in the population at risk. A major challenge is that NZD to a large extent are silent for the humans living in communities in endemic areas. Therefore locally adapted information is required to generate awareness and alter bad practices. At the same time, the change must be approached via an informed support mechanism, veterinarian, public health and agricultural extension workers being aware of the variety of NZD and the different approaches to combat them. ADVANZ will provide evidence-based knowledge of the cost-effectiveness of controlling these diseases in a manner that can be appreciated. We will implement a new model, based on the One Health approach, which targets decision making bodies involved in disease control: relevant Ministries, district health- veterinary and vector control offices and the locally affected communities. A new Pan-African OH NZD network will be created, harnessing strengths from existing disease specific networks and providing a platform for intersectoral collaboration. An advisory board will guide ADVANZ in design and targeting of NZD information materials. Board members will be experts, primarily from Africa drawn from a range of disciplines including of anthropology, health, agriculture, economics, traditional knowledge and environmental sciences. Strategic partners from relevant EU projects, and representatives from WHO and FAO will be additional board members. An international conference, organized jointly with WHO, FAO and OIE (NZ4) will showcase successful NZ approaches and the ADVANZ model.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2010-ITN | Award Amount: 4.30M | Year: 2011

TESIS, Towards an Embodied Science of InterSubjectivity, is an integrated ITN programme to investigate the foundations of human sociality. It brings together the complementary expertise of 13 European research institutes, clinical centres and private enterprises that span the biomedical sciences and the humanities. Thus, TESIS provides critical mass in the fields of philosophy, cognitive neuroscience, developmental psychology, psychiatry and societal outreach. It will advance our understanding of human intersubjectivity based on the following research and training objectives: (1) To investigate the neural underpinnings of affective exchange with others, of shared action spaces and joint object relations, endorsing a novel interactive embodied neuroscience; (2) To investigate the development of social skills in infants in the context of the awareness of others during interaction, yielding an interactive concept of embodied social cognition; (3) To investigate the intersubjective factors affecting psychopathologies, especially schizophrenia, autism and somatoform disorders and to draw implications for treatment; (4) To investigate in toddlers and young children the understanding of toys, objects and cultural artefacts and the links between materiality and sociality; (5) To investigate cultural interactive patterns and shared practices such as group learning, playing, teamwork, distributed cognition, creating applied knowledge for education, management, and organizational development. By integrating state of the art and novel approaches to studying interactive situations, TESIS will significantly extend the individualistic and static paradigm still dominant in social cognition research. The major breakthrough to be expected from TESIS is a comprehensive framework for embodied intersubjectivity applicable in the biomedical sciences, the humanities, and society in general, showing how we become human by embodied interaction with others from the beginning.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-SICA | Phase: KBBE-2007-2-5-04 | Award Amount: 7.59M | Year: 2009

Trade in aquatic products is the largest global food sector, by value, and Asia represents the main external source of aquatic products into the EU. Current EU policy supporting international trade between Asia and Europe concentrates on issues of food safety as measures of quality, whilst market-forces drive development of standards and labels that identify social and environmental parameters. This project proposes to establish an evidence-based framework to support current stakeholder dialogues organised by a third party certifier. This will contribute to harmonising standards, helping consumers to make fully informed choices with regards to the sustainability and safety of their seafood. The Ethical Aquatic Food Index, a qualitative holistic measure of overall sustainability to support consumers purchasing decisions, will be based on detailed research centred around a Life Cycle Assessment of current processes involved in ensuring aquatic products reach consumers, aligned with analyses from the sustainable livelihoods approach and systems thinking. SMEs based in the EU will participate in this project, particularly the action research phase, enhancing their relative competitiveness. By strengthening the knowledge base surrounding EU-Asia seafood trade the project will provide the evidence required to support further expansion whilst ensuring a fair deal for producers who are meeting appropriate social and environmental goals and offering a safe and sustainable product for consumers. The sectors covered represent the main aquaculture products reaching EU markets; tilapia, catfish, shrimps and prawns. Known case study stakeholders include SMEs in Bangladesh, China, Thailand and Vietnam where sustainability is essential in the face of rapid growth. The research will secondarily improve understanding of opportunities for European exports to supply the expanding middleclass in Asia. Outputs will be promoted through workshops, websites, journal and press articles.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 3.95M | Year: 2015

A diverse, complex, and poorly characterised community of microorganisms lies at the heart of the wine an industry worth over 220 billion globally. These microorganisms play key roles at all stages of the viniculture and vinification processes, from helping plants access nutrients from the soil, driving their health through protection against pathogens, to fermentation processes that transform the must into wine with its complex array of aromas and flavours. Given this importance, an improved understanding of the microbial community and its interplay will have significant effects on the industry. In recent years, Next Generation DNA sequencing has revolutionised many areas of biology, including microbiology, through conferring the ability to characterise microbes on the deep community scale, through both shotgun and deep amplicon sequencing approaches. To exploit this power for the benefit of the wine industry, we propose MICROWINE, a 15 ESR Marie Curie Actions European Training Network. The network is constructed as a close collaboration between industry and academic partners, around the theme of the microbial communitys role in the wine production process. Through combining microbial metagenomic sequencing with powerful computation analyses, with metadata generated using techniques such as metabolomics and geochemistry, we will study the action of microbes from the plant protection and nutrition, through to wine fermentation process, using samples collected from both Europe and beyond. We will further train the ESRs across a wide range of relevant disciplines, and maximise information transfer through multiple host and academic-industry cosupervision and secondments. In this way, we anticipate contributing to the strength and scientific progress of the wine industry through training of a cohort of leading, interdisciplinary and tightly interconnected scientists at the forefront of modern microbiological, genomic, computational and related techniques.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 4.00M | Year: 2015

Metabolism is the foundation of all living organisms. While cells in a population are often phenotypically different, most of our current analytical approaches still probe metabolism only at the population level. Because strong evidence exists that metabolic cell-to-cell heterogeneity has, for instance, disease relevance, researcher from MetaRNA will overcome this severe analytical limitation through exploiting exciting opportunities emerging from the RNA field. Such synergy potential between the metabolism and RNA research fields has until today not been exploited, because they are separated from each other in Europe and worldwide. Through consequently missing research training programs we thus lack experts with combined knowledge in metabolism and RNA. The aim of the MetaRNA proposal is therefore to establish a European Training Network (ETN) that educates specialists for academia and industry - fully trained at the interface of these two fields - in the development and application of RNA-based sensors to investigate metabolism at the single-cell level, to apply these tools for novel biotechnological applications and to provide a framework for their future use in diagnostics and therapeutics. In MetaRNA, eight research groups from the metabolic and RNA fields and six partners from the private sector join forces to create a platform of mobility and training to 15 early-stage researchers (ESRs), by means of customized research projects, exchange of knowhow among researchers and partners, attendance to specialized courses, workshops and conferences, as well as training in complementary skills.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-02-2015 | Award Amount: 6.31M | Year: 2016

Alcohol overuse is an important societal challenge with annual healthcare costs of over 22 billion in Europe. Alcohol is the main cause of liver cirrhosis, which is the 5th and 7th most common cause of life years lost in respectively Eastern and Western Europe. Cirrhosis is considered irreversible but its precursor, liver fibrosis, is reversible when detected before disease progression. GALAXY proposes that crosstalk between the gut microbiome and the liver influences the development and progression of alcoholic liver fibrosis. Here, a dysbiotic microbiome in susceptible individuals leads to progressive liver fibrosis in combination with alcohol overuse. Therefore, interventions aiming to restore a healthy gut microbiome will reduce disease development. We will use state-of-the-art systems medicine tools to improve understanding of the complex interplay present during alcoholic liver fibrosis, to identify at-risk individuals in time and to develop personalised healthcare strategies for alcohol over-users (20% of the EU population >15 years old). GALAXY brings together partners with unique research competences in clinical hepatology, microbiome, multi-omics, biomarkers and bioinformatics. Our aim is to develop novel systems medicine tools which integrate clinical, multi-omics and lifestyle information from alcohol over-users at various stages of the disease and healthy individuals in order to: 1) identify signatures of host-microbial cross-talk during disease development and progression, 2) translate this into biomarkers for diagnosis, stratification and treatment monitoring in alcohol over users, and 3) evaluate new interventions to modulate gut microbiota towards prevention and mitigation of the disease in at-risk individuals. We will also study societal and economic impact of GALAXY biomarkers and treatments to accelerate future development. The GALAXY consortium includes strong SME partners who will enable the results to be exploited commercially.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: SC5-10a-2014 | Award Amount: 3.13M | Year: 2015

Mapping and assessment of ecosystems and their services (ES) are core to the EU Biodiversity (BD) Strategy. They are essential if we are to make informed decisions. Action 5 sets the requirement for an EU-wide knowledge base designed to be: a primary data source for developing Europes green infrastructure; resource to identify areas for ecosystem restoration; and, a baseline against which the goal of no net loss of BD and ES can be evaluated. In response to these requirements, ESMERALDA aims to deliver a flexible methodology to provide the building blocks for pan-European and regional assessments. The work will ensure the timely delivery to EU member states in relation to Action 5 of the BD Strategy, supporting the needs of assessments in relation to the requirements for planning, agriculture, climate, water and nature policy. This methodology will build on existing ES projects and databases (e.g. MAES, OpenNESS, OPERAs, national studies), the Millennium Assessment (MA) and TEEB. ESMERALDA will identify relevant stakeholders and take stock of their requirements at EU, national and regional levels. The objective of ESMERALDA is to share experience through an active process of dialogue and knowledge co-creation that will enable participants to achieve the Action 5 aims. The mapping approach proposed will integrate biophysical, social and economic assessment techniques. Flexibility will be achieved by the creation of a tiered methodology that will encompass both simple (Tier 1) and more complex (Tier 3) approaches. The work will exploit expert- and land cover-based methods, existing ES indicator data and more complex ES models. As a result the outcomes will be applicable in different contexts. The strength of the ESMERALDA consortium lies in its ability to make solutions for mapping and assessment problems available to stakeholders from the start of the project, because our expertise allows us to build on existing research projects and data sharing systems.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: WASTE-6b-2015 | Award Amount: 4.25M | Year: 2016

Europes cities are some of the worlds greatest tourism destinations. The socio-economic impact of tourism is extraordinary and urban tourism, but it brings at the same time a range of negative externalities, including high levels of unsustainable resource consumption and waste production. In comparison with other cities, tourist cities have to face additional challenges related to waste prevention and management due to their geographical and climatic conditions, the seasonality of tourism flow and the specificity of tourism industry and of tourists as waste producers. UrBAN-WASTE will support policy makers in answering these challenges and in developing strategies that aim at reducing the amount of municipal waste production and at further support the re-use, recycle, collection and disposal of waste in tourist cities. In doing so UrBAN-WASTE will adopt and apply the urban metabolism approach to support the switch to a circular model where waste is considered as resource and reintegrated in the urban flow. UrBAN-WASTE will perform a metabolic analysis of the state of art of urban metabolism in 11 pilot cities. In parallel a participatory process involving all the relevant stakeholders will be set up through a mobilization and mutual learning action plan. These inputs will be integrated in the strategies along with a review of the most innovative existing technologies and practices in the field of waste management and prevention. The strategies will then be implemented in the 11 cities and the results will be monitored and disseminated facilitating the transfer and adaptation of the project outcomes in other cases.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: HCO-06-2015 | Award Amount: 2.99M | Year: 2015

FRESH AIR is a 3 year project which addresses the urgent need to prevent, diagnose and treat lung diseases in LMICs and other low-resource settings where the greatest burden of disease is experienced. Our Consortium brings together leading international respiratory researchers, clinicians and policy experts from EU member states and the US who have expertise and experience of the challenges of implementation in LMICs and healthcare providers, policy makers and implementers from four countries that represent very different low-resource settings. Members will work together to adapt and test innovation and evidence-based practice in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of lung disease in four low-resource settings in Uganda, Kyrgyz Republic, Vietnam and Greece with high levels of tobacco consumption and exposure to Household Air Pollution (HAP). In so doing, the Consortium will transfer skills and technology from EU member states and the US to new contexts and explore a range of implementation science research questions. The new knowledge this generates will be widely disseminated nationally, regionally and internationally, ensuring the scale-up of interventions tested by the project and global impact of research findings. The project will also provide new perspectives on policy issues of concern to EU members, increase the international profile of EU funded research on key health challenges and open up markets for healthcare innovations. The project has 7 specific objectives focused on the following: 1. Identifying factors influencing the implementation of evidenced-based interventions 2. Exploring which awareness-raising approaches are most effective in achieving behaviour change 3. Adapting interventions that provide smoking cessation support 4. Testing innovative diagnostic methods for COPD 5. Promoting pulmonary rehabilitation as a low cost treatment 6. Reducing childrens risk of lung damage 7. Generating new knowledge, innovation and scalable models.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INFRADEV-3-2015 | Award Amount: 31.03M | Year: 2015

The nations of Europe are distributed around some of the most complex and dynamic geological systems on the planet and understanding these is essential to the security of livelihoods and economic power of Europeans. Many of the solutions to the grand challenges in the geosciences have been led by European scientists the understanding of stratigraphy (the timing and distribution of layers of sediment on Earth) and the discovery of the concept of plate tectonics being among the most significant. Our ability to monitor the Earth is rapidly evolving through development of new sensor technology, both on- and below-ground and from outer space; we are able to deliver this information with increasing rapidity, integrate it, provide solutions to geological understanding and furnish essential information for decision makers. Earth science monitoring systems are distributed across Europe and the globe and measure the physico-chemical characteristics of the planet under different geological regimes. EPOS will bring together 24 European nations and combine national Earth science facilities, the associated data and models together with the scientific expertise into one integrated delivery system for the solid Earth. This infrastructure will allow the Earth sciences to achieve a step change in our understanding of the planet; it will enable us to prepare for geo-hazards and to responsibly manage the subsurface for infrastructure development, waste storage and the use of Earths resources. With a European Research Infrastructure Consortium (ERIC) to be located in Rome (Italy), EPOS will provide an opportunity for Europe to maintain world-leading European Earth sciences and will represent a model for pan-European federated infrastructure.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.2.1.2-2 | Award Amount: 23.12M | Year: 2012

METACARDIS applies a systems medicine multilevel approach to identify biological relationships between gut microbiota, assessed by metagenomics, and host genome expression regulation, which will improve understanding and innovative care of cardiometabolic diseases (CMD) and their comorbidities. CMD comprise metabolic (obesity, diabetes) and heart diseases characterized by a chronic evolution in ageing populations and costly treatments. Therapies require novel integrated approaches taking into account CMD natural evolution. METACARDIS associates European leaders in metagenomics, who have been successful in establishing the structure of the human microbiome as part of the EU FP7 MetaHIT consortium, clinical and fundamental researchers, SME, patients associations and food companies to improve the understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms, prognosis and diagnosis of CMD. We will use next-generation sequencing technologies and high throughput metabolomic platforms to identify gut microbiota- and metabolomic-derived biomarkers and targets associated with CMD risks. The pathophysiological role of these markers will be tested in both preclinical models and replication cohorts allowing the study of CMD progression in patients collected in three European clinical centres of excellence. Their impact on host gene transcription will be characterised in patients selected for typical features of CMD evolution. Application of computational models and visualisation tools to complex datasets combining clinical information, environmental patterns and gut microbiome, metabolome and transcriptome data is a central integrating component in the research, which will be driven by world leaders in metagenomic and functional genomic data analysis. These studies will identify novel molecular targets, biomarkers and predictors of CMD progression, paving the way for personalized medicine in CMD.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2008-1.1.1 | Award Amount: 6.49M | Year: 2009

The fundamental objective of the project is the further integration of existing European research facilities to a grid of reaction chambers in a continuation of the EUROCHAMP project. These facilities were created to study the impact of atmospheric processes e.g. on regional photochemistry, global change, as well as cultural heritage and human health effects under as realistic conditions as possible. Although initial advances in the application of large chambers occurred in the United States and Japan, Europe now leads the world in the use of large, highly instrumented chambers for atmospheric model development and evaluation. Smaller chambers that were designed for specific purposes and are operated by experts in their fields excellently supplement the larger chambers. The integration of all these environmental chamber facilities within the framework of the EUROCHAMP-2 project promotes the retention of Europes international position of excellence in this area and is unique in its kind worldwide. The mobilisation of a large number of stakeholders dealing with environmental chamber techniques provides an infrastructure to the research community at an European level that offers maximum support for a broad community of researchers from different disciplines. The EUROCHAMP-2 project will foster the structuring effect of atmospheric chemistry activities performed in European environmental chambers within EUROCHAMP, since it offers the full availability of corresponding facilities for the whole European scientific community. With respect to the project objectives mentioned above, three network activities, two joint research activities and a transnational access activity are formulated and cross-linked in the EUROCHAMP-2 project.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: SwafS-25-2016 | Award Amount: 642.36K | Year: 2016

The proposed European Academy for Biomedical Science (ENABLE) consortium will connect aspiring European researchers of tomorrow with prominent scientists of today, in particular to inspire and to give them the necessary tools to follow in their footsteps. ENABLE will organize peer-reviewed symposia celebrating European life science achievements from molecule to man/patient. These symposia will have a strong element of public outreach and engagement thereby giving all stakeholders a voice on medical scientific discovery. A new and unique brand of conferences aimed at accelerating life science discovery and personalized medicine. ENABLE scientific symposia: ENABLE will organize an annual scientific symposium, across one of the thematic areas of the partner institutes with the intention of exploring the newest research and pioneering developments. These ENABLE symposia will be organized entirely by a committee of PhD students and postdocs i.e. by and for young researchers, including basic, applied and clinical scientists (in training). ENABLE outreach: ENABLE symposia will actively seek public engagement via outreach activities to the European adult public as well as primary- and high-school children. From rejoicing scientific achievements to public understanding of scientific research, open discussions regarding challenging and ethical topics are paramount, e.g. hype versus hope. These topics will be addressed in specially designed events for the target groups, providing a first European platform for such consultations and knowledge exchange. ENABLing careers: Coupled to the scientific symposium, ENABLE will organize specific career workshops covering essential skills and job opportunities. ENABLing careers will become a hub for promoting open positions for undergraduates and young researchers in European institutions undertaking biomedical and life sciences research.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2011.1.4-1 | Award Amount: 7.81M | Year: 2012

Neurodegenerative disorders such as, Alzheimers disease (AD), Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), stroke, Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and chronic stress create a major economic burden to society and a substantial reduction in quality of life for patients and families. The development of neuroregenerative therapies is notoriously difficult and requires significant investment. NeuroFGL will contribute to decrease these barriers through: (1) the clinical advancement of a promising novel regenerative therapy (FGLs) for neurological disorders, (2) hedging the clinical development by developing tests that enable early clinical assessments to be made, thereby maximising the chance that FGL and other neurogenerative therapies actually become developed to the benefit of patients and society; and (3) Selecting a target patient population with less variability and thereby easier to study reducing and time resources needed, and increase predictability . FGLs is a promising and novel regenerative therapy being the clinical lead development candidate selected from a group of allosteric FGF-receptor modulators (referred to as FGL) mimicking NCAM. FGL has demonstrated positive effects in a number of in vivo models of neurodegeneration, e.g. beta-amyloid induced toxicity, global ischemia and chronic stress. The in vivo effects of FGL suggest a disease-modifying activity in several neurodegenerative disorders, such as neurogenesis. A phase I clinical study has demonstrated a FGL peptide to be well tolerated and safe. NeuroFGL will refine existing and develop new tests and techniques, that will at an early stage of the clinical development: (1) provide better information on the mechanisms of action (NCAM mimicking allosteric FGF recoter modulation) in man, (2) deliver translational effects seen between animal and man, (3) provide results earlier and cheaper, increasing the iteratiation and (4) select patients with conditions associated with less variability, e.g. patients with AD with a specific EEG or patients progressing to AD identified in patients with MCI. These developments will together provide a more robust basis for the development of FGLs, other drugs with a similar mechanism of action and other therapies for neurodegenerative disorders.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 3.46M | Year: 2017

Quantum Information Access and Retrieval Theory We aim to establish an European Training Network (ETN) on QUantum information Access and Retrieval Theory (QUARTZ). Towards a new approach to Information Access and Retrieval (IAR) addressing the challenges of the dynamic and multimodal nature of the data and user interaction context, QUARTZ aims to educate its Early Stage Researchers (ESRs) to adopt a novel theoretically and empirically motivated approach to IAR based on the quantum mechanical framework that gives up the notions of unimodal features and classical ranking models disconnected from context. Each ESR will be aware that the current state of the art of IAR is not sufficient to address the challenges of a dynamic, adaptive and context-aware user-machine interaction and to make a major breakthrough in the overall effectiveness of retrieval systems, and that a genuine theoretical breakthrough is on the contrary necessary. We believe that this breakthrough can be provided by quantum theory which can integrate abstract vector spaces, probability spaces and logic in a single theoretical framework which extend and generalize the classical vector, probability and logic spaces utilised in IAR. QUARTZ will consist of training activities and ESR research projects which investigate theoretical issues and evaluate methods and prototypes for adaptive IAR systems managing large data collections and meeting the end users information needs in a dynamic context.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 2.98M | Year: 2016

The overall objective of BioCapture is to develop novel robust assays for proteinaceous biomarkers associated with cancer and to develop innovative tools for assaying elusive cancer related posttranslational modifications in proteins. This will be achieved by exploiting robust glycan, peptide and protein binders in the form of Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIPs) or plastic antibodies alongside generic enrichment combined with selected reaction monitoring-based mass spectrometry assays. In addition, sequence specific MIPs for multiple proteotypic peptides will be developed for use as capture phases in array format followed by MS or fluorescence based readout as well as a coupling of both detection techniques. The artificial receptors will be developed by various Molecular Imprinting techniques. The research results will lead to technological advances having a major impact on 1) health care since it will profit from methods for earlier, more reliable diagnosis of diseases, 2) drug discovery allowing a faster target or biomarker identification; and 3) biochemistry research laboratories in resulting in improved protein fractionation tools for revealing low abundant post translational modifications. The training of researchers will be performed by a consortium consisting of in total 15 partners whereof 6 polymer/materials research groups, 5 protein/glycan chemistry/analysis groups, 1 separation technology companies, 2 expert groups on platforms for multiplex analysis and one diagnostic company. This forms the basis for a very exciting interdisciplinary training program. Thus 11 early stage researchers (ESRs) working on specific tasks within five work packages will follow a rich training program providing a well-balanced spectrum of scientific, business and entrepreneurial skills.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: ENERGY.2012.8.8.1 | Award Amount: 4.49M | Year: 2013

Today climate change causes serious problems to the societies worldwide and Europe starts to feel its consequences. At the same time European community is facing economical problems. One of the main producers of greenhouse gases is the non sustainable energy production and use. Therefore there is an urgent need to reduce energy use in most cost effective way. PLEEC will gather cities with innovative planning and ambitious energy saving goals. It will identify technology, citizens behaviors and structure driven efficiency potentials within urban planning and key city aspects. PLEEC will assess the status of energy efficiency and energy flows in the participating European middle size cities. It will improve understanding of basic conditions for energy efficiency in the cities through joint activities between city planners and researchers on technology, citizens behavior and structures. By finding the optimal mix of all energy efficiency measures the model for strategic sustainable planning will be created together with the action plans for implementation and management. The model and the action plans will address key aspects relevant for the whole city. They will be supported by the public authorities on the highest political levels. Analysis of time line, the costs and pay-back periods will be done based on different regulatory and market conditions of the participating cities. The model will guide the cities to find the most cost effective implementation of the EU SET-Plan goals to reduce energy use in EU by 20% till 2020.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE-2007-3-3-04;KBBE-2007-3-3-05 | Award Amount: 8.07M | Year: 2009

This proposal will (further) develop and apply metagenomics tools to access the enzymatic potential borne in the cryptic biota of selected natural habitats, in particular target soil-related and aquatic ones. In the light of the environmental relevance of chitins and lignins (as natural compounds recalcitrant to degradation) and halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds (anthropogenic recalcitrant compounds), the enzymatic activities that we will target are functions able to degrade these compounds. A database of gene functions will be established and maintained. Next to its great relevance to environmental biotechnology including bioremediation, a spin-off of the work will be the discovery of novel biocatalytic functions of industrial relevance. We will in particular address the catabolic potential that is encoded by the mobilome, the collective pool of mobile genetic elements in the microbiota. We will further apply high-throughput (454-based) sequencing to rapidly unravel the metabolic complement in this mobile gene pool. The project brings together a suite of 15 contractors across Europe, encompassing 21 laboratories spread over 11 copuntries and including 4 SMEs. Most of the partners are renowned laboratories which have vast experience in metagenomics of environmental samples, biotechnology, enzymology, bioinformatics, the mobilome, waste management and bioremediation and enzyme production.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE-2007-2-4-05 | Award Amount: 6.75M | Year: 2009

Food Safety Objectives (FSO) and Performance Objectives (PO) are new criteria complementing the existing concepts of microbiological criteria and MRL for many chemical contaminants. However, to achieve these objectives it is critically important a harmonisation of food safety control procedures. BASELINE project intends to obtain the following objectives: 1) To review the sampling schemes currently available for food authorities and food producers to perform food safety quantitative risk assessment in a European level; 2) To assess the relevance and suitable limit values of POs and FSOs for biological and chemical risks; 3) To evaluate the need for new or adapted methods for sampling and testing of the risk factors identified. The selected protocols and methods should be able to produce suitable data for risk analysis; 4) To develop predictive mathematical models for biological risks and investigate and model sources and pathways of chemical contaminants to improve sampling schemes; 5) To validate and harmonise the sampling schemes developed in the project and alternative detection methods; 6) To share and disseminate the scientific knowledge deriving from the project to stakeholders. The BASELINE work plan has been divided in 9 work packages: WP1- management, WP2-WP6 sampling protocols for specific food matrixes, WP7-risk modelling, WP8-validation and harmonisation of sampling protocols, WP9-dissemination and training. The major output of the project is to generate new knowledge on sampling schemes for risk assessment by using a mathematical approach for different groups of food products as seafood, eggs and egg products, fresh meats, milk and dairy products and plant products. The project results will be translated in clear recommendations to the EC and end users and they will have a significant impact on protecting human and veterinary health.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2011.1.2-04 | Award Amount: 4.89M | Year: 2012

ADAPTAWHEAT will show how flowering time variation can be exploited for the genetic improvement of the European wheat crop to optimise adaptation and performance in the light of predicted climate change. It will test current hypotheses that postulate specific changes in ear emergence and the timing and duration of developmental phases, which are thought of as components of ear emergence, will improve wheat productivity. Precise genetic stocks varying in specific flowering time elements and subjected to genotyping and characterisation with diagnostic markers for key flowering time genes will be used to test these hypotheses. They will be phenotyped at the molecular (transcript abundance), physiological (growth stage dissection) and agronomic (yield components) levels in multiple field trials located at sites in Europe that represent regional agricultural diversity and at non European locations that have mega environments of relevance. Controlled environment experiments will investigate specific environmental interactions including day length, ambient temperature, and heat stress. Data analysis will aid the construction of new wheat flowering models that can be used to refine existing hypotheses. They will allow standing genetic variation for flowering time in European germplasm to be deployed more efficiently in wheat breeding programmes. This knowledge will be used to inform searches for specific phenotypic and molecular variants in diverse and non adapted wheat germplasm panels provided by consortium members. Vital novel genetic variation will be efficiently imported into the germplasm of European wheat breeders. The project will deliver new diagnostic markers for genotyping, molecular reporters for novel breeding selection strategies and the tools and knowledge necessary for a combined physiology and genomics led predictive wheat breeding programme. A conduit for these outcomes will be three SMEs, who will exploit the tools developed to deliver these outcomes.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2011.1.2-02;KBBE.2011.1.4-06 | Award Amount: 3.88M | Year: 2012

This proposal, INEMAD will concentrate on innovative strategies to reconnect livestock and crop production farming systems. New flows of energy and materials within the agricultural sector (or linked to the agricultural sector) will be analysed and will create opportunities for re-thinking the relation between crop and livestock production. Various options to cope with recycling, greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation, and bio-based economy will need an integral assessment on energy and nutrient flows and will cause new arrangements between firms, land use and land management. INEMAD will address the question of what new methods and how new arrangements should be developed to restore the recycling within the specialisation context. To realize these ambitions, the leading principle of INEMAD is a triangular enlargement of the traditional farming systems with a processing system. Processing is proposed as a third system, to be linked with crop and the livestock production, in order to increase agricultural productivity while reducing external energy input and closing nutrient cycle. Nutrient recycling can be done by biogas production and the use of digestate as fertilizer. Digestate can not only replace the manure but also chemical fertiliser because of its comparable properties. INEMAD will analyse improvements options for biogas plants, valorisation options for the digestate, improve the management by the use of optimisation models and compare organisational structures.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP-2008-4.0-1 | Award Amount: 10.56M | Year: 2009

Currently, around 30 million people in the enlarged Europe suffer from diabetes, with a prevalence of 7.5% in member states. In recent years the emergence of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents is a new and serious health challenge to the youth of Europe, their families and society. By 2025, the number of people with diabetes is expected to rise to around 50 million in Europe, thus increasing prevalence to 10.9%. This devastating disease is ranked among the leading causes of fatal cardiovascular diseases, kidney failure, neuropathy, lower limb amputation and blindness. Estimates of annual direct cost of diabetes care in Europe are currently EUR 50 billion. The indirect costs of diabetes i.e. the cost of lost production are as high as direct costs or even higher. Diabetes results from an absolute or relative decline in pancreatic -cell function and/or mass. Although of ultimate importance for diabetes management and the development of new therapies, hitherto, no clinically established methodology for non-invasive in vivo imaging and quantification of -cell mass (BCM) exists. VIBRANT proposes superparamagnetic fluorous phase nanocontainers (FPNC), which are functionalized with -cell specific ligands for in vivo MRI. This combines -cell specific targeting with the unrivalled MRI sensitivity of supermagnetic particles and the high resolution power of 19F-containing contrast agents, and hence will outperform existing MRI technology. Furthermore, target specific drug-loaded nanocontainers will offer high potential for -cell directed therapies. VIBRANT will offer theranostic solutions to the utmost urgent problems in the health care management of diabetes, substantially improving the early diagnosis, thus preventing distressful and costly complications, contributing to the development of new therapies for the regeneration of -cell mass, and thus directly impacting health status and life quality of patients, health care budgets and economies within the EU.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2011.1.2-03 | Award Amount: 3.91M | Year: 2012

There is a need to improve sustainability in farming systems particularly through soil care and improvement, but not at the expense of productivity. One approach is to focus on a comprehensive advance in conservation tillage. This will be developed from improved ways of integrating subsidiary crops (SC) as living or dead mulches or cover crops with the main crops in rotations so as to simultaneously improve crop nutrition, health, and productivity. The SC will deliver multiple ecological services by increasing the duration of soil cover in the rotation overall while increasing species diversity, minimising the use of tillage and agrochemicals, enhancing biological N fixation and soil C content, and both reducing water demand in dry climates and improving soil workability in wetter climates. The research will draw on a wide range of previous and ongoing EU and related projects and will be based on 11 coordinated field experiments in different climatic regions together with three long-term experiments in Europe and Brazil. These experiments will all be assessed for economic and ecological impact including the often neglected issue of legume root health. Breeding companies and manufacturers of agricultural equipment from all regions of interest will be involved in finding adapted solutions for the different environments by extending the range of potentially useful plant species and by developing appropriate machinery to promote adoption in practical agriculture. The potential for useful chemical extraction from the existing and novel SCs will also be investigated. A central deliverable will be a database supported Cover Crop and Living Mulch Toolbox and Decision Support Tool which will encourage multilingual stakeholder exchange and dissemination during and beyond the lifetime of the project so as to capture farmer experience. The results of the project as a whole will be of use for and improve sustainability in low-input, organic, and conventional farming systems.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: BBI-RIA | Phase: BBI.VC2.R5-2015 | Award Amount: 5.26M | Year: 2016

The project focuses on increasing access to wood resources through more efficient silviculture and a better understanding of the business models governing the procurement of forest operations services. The project further considers increasing efficiency in forest harvesting and collection, and the reduction of soil impact from forest operations, and puts forward ways of making this a measurable and integrated part of operational efficiency. TECH4EFFECT offers the potential to revolutionize forest operations with a state-of-the-art knowledge-based efficiency development system, providing easily accessible decision support exploiting the large amount of data available in modern industrial forest management. The ambition of TECH4EFFECT is to implement such as management tool, enhanced through 4 years of intensive R&D in close cooperation with the end-users of the Efficiency Portal in 5 participating countries. It is the projects hope that implementation will result in such obvious benefits amongst the industrial partners that its application will become widespread within the European forest sector.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN | Award Amount: 4.99M | Year: 2012

The TRAINBIODIVERSE ITN will provide professional skills and training for young scientists covering multi-disciplinary aspects of soil biodiversity, ecosystem services, their economic significance and practical implications and implementation. The researchers will gain access to European educational and network facilities and training aimed at ensuring the wellbeing of human populations and the continued availability of sustainable recourses underpinned by soil microbiology. Practical and theoretical training related to monitoring, evaluating and improving the quality of biodiversity in European soils, in combination with training professionals to ensure enhanced intersectorial skills and communications will help to secure the future of European ecosystem services and agricultural production. TRAINBIODIVERSE will fill the gap between specialists in different institutions and administrative bodies providing information and policy on biodiversity and ecosystem services in Europe. The consortium encompasses different academic, non-academic industrial economic and political professions in different sectors. An understanding of the interrelationships and communications between the different sectors involved will be made available to European researchers for the first time. This will coincide with increases in related governmental policy and actions. The training will cover the process for applying scientific rational to political implementation. Initial training will commence with field and laboratory work then proceeding through interpretation of results to economic evaluation for managerial administrative and decision making processes and application of the information.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2013.3.1-01 | Award Amount: 9.55M | Year: 2013

Plants synthesize a staggering variety of secondary metabolites, and this chemodiversity is a poorly used pool of natural molecules with bioactive properties of importance for applications in the pharma and food industries. BacHBerry focusses on phenolic compounds, a large and diverse class of plant metabolites, which are currently in the spotlight due to their claimed beneficial effects in prevention and treatment of chronic diseases, but that also have applications as cosmetics, flavours and food colorants etc. Berries are soft and colourful fruits, with great diversity, high content and unique profiles in phenolic compounds, making them a major source of these high-value metabolites. The BacHBerry project aims to develop a portfolio of sustainable methodologies to mine the potential of the untapped biodiversity of the bioactive phenolic compounds in an extensive collection of berry species. Full exploitation of this unrivalled natural resource requires an integrated and comprehensive effort from bioprospecting in berries using SMART high-throughput screens for the valorisation of phenolic bioactivities aligned with their identification using cutting edge analytics and subsequent elucidation of their biosynthetic pathways. This knowledge will facilitate metabolic engineering of suitable bacterial hosts for high-value phenolics production in scalable fermentation bioprocesses, ultimately serving as commercial production platforms. The consortium comprises a full chain of research and innovation, with 12 research groups, 5 SMEs and a large enterprise, representing 10 countries including partners from ICPC countries Russia, Chile and China, with the capacity to exploit novel bioactivities from berry fruits diversity. BacHBerry develops a pipeline of sustainable and cost-effective processes to facilitate production of added-value berry phenolics with immediate potential for commercialization and consequent socio-economic benefits for the European community and beyond.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN | Award Amount: 3.80M | Year: 2012

The MINSC Initial Training Network (ITN) is comprised of partners from first-rate universities and high-level industrial partners located in the United Kingdom, France, Denmark, Iceland, Germany, Norway, and Italy. The prime aims of this network is to provide research and training opportunities to a new generation of young fellows in fundamental and collaborative research projects related to the nucleation and growth of a series of relevant scale mineral systems in the absence or presence of inhibitors agents. The training will combine molecular level research with studies linked to clear industrial processes at the field-level. The ultimate goal is to better understand one of the highly relevant problems in oil, geothermal and food industrial processes: pipe clogging and surface corrosion by mineral scale precipitates during production. To achieve this, the network will combine training of early stage and experienced researchers in state-of-the-art techniques of mineral formation and characterization both in laboratory and industrial settings with research objectives that aim at quantifying the nucleation and growth of several mineral systems: carbonates, sulphates/sulphides, oxalates and silicates. Scaling can often be retarded via inhibitors but their role in affecting rates of formation of these minerals in solution, on surfaces as well as in real-world industrial settings (i.e., pipes, cores etc.) are unknown. We will determine these rates in laboratory experiments and implement and test these novel findings directly in industrial power plant systems. The prime industrially-driven science goal is twofold (a) to better understand what leads to the precipitation of a series of mineral scales causing a massive decrease in efficiency and increased cost for industrial processes (i.e., oil and gas production, geothermal energy, beer) and (b) to develop processes/inhibitors that can help mitigate and / or prevent scale formation in such environments.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2010-1.1.14 | Award Amount: 9.90M | Year: 2011

Genome sequencing initiated a new age in biology. Now, the emphasis is on the biological interpretation of the genome: zooming on the biological functioning of the gene-products, i.e. the proteins, emerging into a filed termed proteomics. Protein levels depend not only on mRNA levels, but also on translational controls & regulated degradation, making the measurement of expression at the protein level a prerequisite. The expression levels of all proteins, their modifications, localization and interactions, provide the most relevant single data set characterizing a biological system. The PRIME-XS consortium aims to provide state-of-the-art proteomics technologies to the European biological and biomedical research community. Its twelve partners, all leading in the field of proteomics, will provide access to their technology at six access facilities, distributed over Europe, will develop new technologies to better aid the research community in answering current day scientific questions, and will organize a wide range of meetings, courses and training events to disseminate their knowledge and expertise. Special emphasis will be placed on extending this knowledge to new member states of the European Union and other regions of Europe with less privileged availability of proteomics facilities. Access to the facilities will be advertised widely and will be open to all researchers in Europe, via an open, independently reviewed, online application system. Research proposals will be evaluated and, if selected, linked to an appropriate access facility. Many of the partners will be involved in research projects aiming at the development of new methods and tools to aid the access facilities and users. Results obtained will be communicated to both facility operators as well as user via publications, meetings and courses. Together with an industrial platform, users as well as other stakeholders, the consortium will also aim to provide the basis for a sustainable, Europe wide, proteomics community to maintain the high level of proteomics access and research, also beyond the duration of this project.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: NMP-2010-1.2-2 | Award Amount: 3.22M | Year: 2011

The overall aim of the NanoCelluComp project is to develop a technology to utilise the high mechanical performance of cellulose nanofibres, obtained from food processing waste streams, combined with bioderived matrix materials, for the manufacture of high performance composite materials that will replace glass and carbon fibre reinforced plastics in many applications including transportation, wind turbines, biomedical, sport and consumer goods. The technology will include two key stages: 1) liberation of cellulose nanofibres from vegetable food waste and combining the nanofibres with polysaccharides in a single process free of organic solvents to form a 100% bio-composite comprising up to 75 wt% of cellulose nanofibres and 2) orientation of cellulose nanofibres and compaunding the composite in a form easily usable for established technologies, e.g. in the form of bio-prepregs or as composite fibres suitable for bonding with a bioresin. The development of the technology components will be based on the principals of green chemistry and green engineering and aimed to achieve the Technology Readiness Level 6 (a prototype demonstration in a relevant environment) by the end of the project. The project directly addresses all key objectives of the NMP.2010.1.2.1-2 topic. In particular, the new process and materials will significantly contribute to increase in the sustainability of high performance composites by using vegetable food processing waste; reduction on the demand of scarce or non-environmentally friendly raw materials by replacing synthetic materials with bioderived nanocellulose and polysaccharides; elimination of use of volatile solvents in polymer composite production processes by using only water as solvent; reduction in the energy consumption in composite manufacture. The substitution potential of the new materials shall be investigated in a systematic way during the project.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: SiS-2010-3.0.3.1 | Award Amount: 1.65M | Year: 2011

Inspired by the merging of the artists studio with the research lab to create a hybrid creative space, STUDIOLAB proposes the creation of a new European platform for creative interactions between art and science. STUDIOLAB brings together major players in scientific research with centres of excellence in the arts and experimental design and leverages the existence of a new network of hybrid spaces to pilot a series of projects at the interface between art and science including Le Laboratoire (Paris), Science Gallery (Trinity College Dublin), Royal College of Art (London), Ars Electronica (Linz) and MediaLab Prado (Madrid) and STUDIOLAB will involve activities along three key dimensions: incubation of art-science projects, education and public engagement.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SC1-PM-04-2016 | Award Amount: 10.41M | Year: 2017

Early life is an important window of opportunity to improve health across the full lifecycle. European pregnancy and child cohort studies together offer an unique opportunity to identify a wide range of early life stressors linked with individual biological, developmental and health trajectory variations, and to the onset and evolution of non-communicable diseases. LIFECYCLE will establish the EuroCHILD Cohort Network, which brings together existing, successful pregnancy and child cohorts and biobanks, by developing a governance structure taking account of national and European ethical, legal and societal implications, a shared data-management platform and data-harmonization strategies. LIFECYCLE will enrich this EuroCHILD Cohort Network by generating new integrated data on early life stressors related to socio-economic, migration, urban environment and life-style determinants, and will capitalize on these data by performing hypothesis-driven research on early life stressors influencing cardio-metabolic, respiratory and mental health trajectories during the full lifecycle, and the underlying epigenetic mechanisms. LIFECYCLE will translate these results into recommendations for targeted strategies and personalized prediction models to improve health trajectories for current and future Europeans generations by optimizing their earliest phase of life. To strengthen this long-term collaboration, LIFECYCLE will organize yearly international meetings open to pregnancy and child cohort researchers, introduce a Fellowship Training Programme for exchange of junior researchers between European pregnancy or child cohorts, and develop e-learning modules for researchers performing life-course health studies. Ultimately, LIFECYCLE will lead to a unique sustainable EuroCHILD Cohort Network, and provide recommendations for targeted prevention strategies by identification of novel markers of early life stressors related to health trajectories throughout the lifecycle.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE-2009-1-2-13 | Award Amount: 5.09M | Year: 2010

The recent decline of European eel (Anguilla anguilla) and no signs of recovery has brought attention to the biologically unsustainable exploitation of the stock. In September 2007, the EU has adopted the Council Regulation 1100/2007 establishing measures for the recovery of the European eel stock. However, eel are still fished intensively for human consumption while aquaculture and restocking rely exclusively on the supply of glass eels caught each year. A controlled production of eel larvae is ever more urgent. The objective of PRO-EEL is to develop standardised protocols for production of high quality gametes, viable eggs and feeding larvae. The approach is to expand knowledge about the intricate hormonal control and physiology of eels which complicates artificial reproduction. This knowledge will be applied in the development of suitable methods to induce maturation considering different rearing conditions. Knowledge about the gametogenesis and maturation pattern will be developed in small scale tests and applied to establish standardised fertilisation procedures. New knowledge about functional anatomy of embryos and yolksac larvae will be applied to develop suitable feed. Protocols for larval production will be tested in full scale experimental facilities managed in collaboration with a qualified SME. The integrated protocols and technology development will be evaluated relative to the output of healthy embryos and yolksac larvae. Larval feeds will be developed towards pioneering first-feeding in European eel larvae, which will be a major breakthrough and promising step towards a self-sustained aquaculture. The strength of the project is its interdisciplinary approach and the unique expertise of the consortium. PRO-EEL brings together leading institutes in eel reproduction complemented by excellence in disciplines filling gaps in knowledge and technology. A tight collaboration with the aquaculture industry promotes the applicability of developed technology.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: KBBE.2011.2.6-02 | Award Amount: 2.33M | Year: 2011

The goal of SUSFOOD is to reinforce the scientific cooperation between EU member and associated states in order to maximise the contribution of research to the development of more sustainable food systems: responding to the increasing demand for food to be met by increasing production sustainably and reducing losses and waste mitigating the impact on the environment combating obesity, malnutrition, and under-nutrition reducing inequalities between rich and poor individuals and populations improving the European agribusinesss competitiveness. The scope of SUSFOOD encompasses the entire food supply chain with main focus on food chain sustainability beyond the farm gate, taking account of work pre-farm gate developed in other initiatives. It will cover processing, packaging, transport, retailing, food services, storage and consumer activities. It promotes a multi-disciplinary approach, from biology to food engineering, and social sciences. SUSFOOD will fulfil the following objectives: Enhance synergies between research programmes on sustainable food production and consumption Increase cooperation between the organisations in order to carry out ambitious research projects Maximise assets exploitation by pooling material and intellectual resources in the partners states Promote outputs of the network via dissemination and knowledge transfer activities to the wider community Support competitiveness and economic growth, with focus on small and medium enterprises. The concept of the project is to foster the coordination between the participants programmes through a need-driven four-step approach: Information exchange and mapping to improve mutual acquaintance and share of best practices Strategic orientation of research programmes to eliminate overlapping and tackle unaddressed and novel issues Joint activities to consolidate and harmonise partnership and outline common vision and agenda Calls for proposals to support joint strategic research activities.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE.2011.2.2-03 | Award Amount: 11.56M | Year: 2012

Nutrition during early development has an important impact on later health, particularly through greater obesity risk, as demonstrated by FP6 EARNEST. EarlyNutrition explores the current key hypotheses on likely causes and pathways to prevention of early life origins of obesity (specifically adiposity) and associated disorders. We bring extraordinary expertise and study populations of 470,000 individuals to investigate: The fuel mediated in utero hypothesis The accelerated postnatal weight gain hypothesis The mismatch hypothesis. Scientific and technical expertise in placental biology, epigenetics and metabolomics will provide understanding at the cellular and molecular level, and refined strategies for intervention in pregnancy and early post natal life to prevent obesity. Using existing cohort studies, ongoing and novel intervention studies and a basic science programme, we will provide the scientific foundations for evidence based recommendations for optimal EarlyNutrition that incorporate long-term health outcomes, focusing on 4 Target Groups: women before pregnancy; pregnant women; infants (incl. breastfeeding); young children. Evidence is produced from animal and placental studies (Theme 1; T1), prospective cohort studies (T2), and randomised controlled trials in pregnant women and infants (T3). T4 covers scientific strategic integration, recommendation development and dissemination, including systematic reviews and behaviour change approaches. A strong multi-disciplinary team of international leaders in the field including collaborators from USA and Australia achieves balance and complementarity. The projects impact comprises definitive evidence on early nutrition effects on health, enhanced EU and global policies, major economic benefits through obesity prevention and value-added nutritional products, and practical recommendations on optimal nutrition in Target Groups. Wide dissemination will be achieved through active engagement with stakeholders.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: HEALTH-2009-4.3.1-1 | Award Amount: 5.16M | Year: 2010

The aim of this project is to develop a new generation vaccine for schistosomiasis. The vaccine will be based on exposed proteins and/or glycans of the vulnerable skin stage schistosomula, making it safe and effective. The life stage-specific vaccine target selection strategy is based on state-of-the-art schistosomal transcriptomics and glycomics technologies and data, and unique serum and sample libraries from endemic areas will be the key to identifying protective immune responses and effective targets. Preclinical in vitro (cellular and whole parasite) and in vivo (rat model) testing of protective antigens with respect to cellular responses and effective parasite killing are part of the development pipeline. Analysis of human T- and B-cell responsiveness is an integral part of the approach. A unique SME-led approach to potentiate the effect of immunisation by use of engineering engineered antibodies will also be part of the project. The project involves strong participation of researchers from four schistosomiasis-endemic countries, and several European groups all with a long history of successful collaboration.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN | Award Amount: 4.10M | Year: 2012

Europe must face the Grand Challenges of climate change and global warming, which will seriously affect the production of foods, including animal feeds. Tightening supplies of energy, foods and feeds will further impact on food security. Feeding animals in Europe with large quantities of imported soyabeans is not sustainable. Home-grown protein sources, such as forage legumes, offer a valuable alternative, but ruminant animals make inefficient use of protein from most forage legumes. LegumePlus proposes to investigate alternative forage legumes, which increase feed use efficiency through their bioactive polyphenols. In addition to tackling such sustainability issues, they will also contribute to livestock health, welfare and reduce environmental emissions. LegumePlus will study the efficacy of bioactive legumes to i) optimise ruminant nutrition, ii) reduce greenhouse gas emissions and iii) improve milk, cheese and meat quality. It will also investigate how bioactive legumes can control parasitic worms in animals. This network will enable integrated multidisciplinary and intersectoral research training. New tools for comparative genomics in plant breeding will be harnessed and exploited to benefit ruminants and the environment. A new generation of agricultural biotechnologists will be trained to work across disciplines and solve sustainability and bioresource issues. Young researchers will acquire a thorough understanding of ruminant nutrition and parasitology, analytical chemistry and plant breeding and excellent training in state-of-the-art and industrially relevant scientific skills. Close collaboration between participants from the public and private sectors will ensure that the training programme will enhance the employability of young researchers and meet employers requirements for interdisciplinary and transferrable skills. This will contribute to the EU policy aim of transforming Europe into an eco-efficient, knowledge based bio-economy.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN | Award Amount: 3.66M | Year: 2012

The aim of this ITN is to promote research and training in the field of epigenetics associated with human disease. Expression of imprinted genes is mono-allelic and gamete of origin-dependent. This is due to different epigenetic modifications present on the maternal and paternal chromosomes. Failure in normal establishment, maintenance or erasure of these marks results in gene dosage dysregulation and Imprinting Disorders (IDs). This ITN brings together different expertise from both public and private sectors with the aim of investigating the physiology and pathology of Genomic Imprinting. We propose to define mechanisms, molecular factors and pathways regulating DNA-methylation and chromatin dynamics involved in gene expression control in human health and disease. This concerted approach has the potential to identify new and more effective diagnostic, preventive and therapeutic strategies for IDs, and more generally to elucidate roles and origin of epigenetic mutations in human pathologies, including common diseases. Early stage (ESRs) and experienced researchers (ERs) will have access to a range of cutting-edge methodologies to enable the application of integrated multidisciplinary strategies to analyse epigenetic phenomena. The excellent scientific and educational environment and the intense public-private sector collaboration will promote high-level training of the young researchers. The ESRs and ERs will acquire experience and expertise in a variety of disciplines, including molecular, cellular and developmental biology, genomics, bioinformatics, chromatin dynamics and epigenetics and phenotypic analysis, and state-of-the-art methodologies such as gene targeting, stem cell culture, epigenetic and chromatin technologies, and massively parallel sequencing. Hence, this ITN will generate a new cohort of scientists trained in contemporary post-genomic biology and able to apply advanced technological tools to investigate human disease in both academia and industry.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH.2011.2.1.1-2 | Award Amount: 16.07M | Year: 2011

Embryonic stem (ES) cells have the potential to differentiate into any type of cell as well as to renew indefinitely in culture. They hold great potential for the development of personalized medicines. However, the molecular mechanisms underpinning cell fate decisions by individual cells are poorly understood. There is compelling evidence that two large multi-protein machines, the Nucleosome Remodelling and Deacetylation (NuRD) complex and the Polycomb Repressive Complexes (PRCs), modulate chromatin structure to control stem cell renewal, lineage commitment and differentiation. Moreover, they are clearly implicated in cancer. The goal of 4DCellFate is to understand how the PRC/NuRD complexes and their plethora of interactions (protein/protein, protein/nucleosome, protein/nucleic acids) regulate cell fate. To obtain this global, quantitative and dynamic 4D understanding of the structure/functions of these two multi-protein machines during ES cell differentiation and in different disease states, we propose a large scale multi-disciplinary data-gathering approach combining European excellence in interactomics (affinity purification, quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics, ChIP-seq analysis, light microscopy), structural biology (X-ray crystallography, NMR, native-state mass spectrometry, Electron Microscopy, biochemistry/biophysics), cellular, tumour, and computational biology. We expect to significantly advance the technology, mainly in the fields of proteomics, structural biology, and small molecule screening, and to make our knowledge, reagents and data publicly available to the scientific community. The ultimate outcome of 4DCellFate will be to lay the foundations for understanding the role of the PRC/NuRD complexes in ES cell differentiation and cancer, specifically in leukaemogenesis. Three SMEs and one large multi-national pharma will be actively involved ensuring that our findings can be translated into new ways to control complex diseases.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2013.1.3-03 | Award Amount: 12.00M | Year: 2013

Production diseases compromise health and welfare, generating inefficiencies which impact adversely on profitability, environmental footprint, antibiotic use and product quality. The PROHEALTH project will develop understanding of the multi-factorial dimension of animal pa-thologies linked to the intensification of production and use this to develop, evaluate and disseminate ef-fective control strategies to reduce impact. It will address production diseases of pigs and poultry raised in a wide range of EU intensive systems, using both epidemiological and experimental approaches to consider the extent of, and the risk factors associated with diseases, the influence of genotype and its modification by early life experience, and the dynamic influences of the environment on disease. The mechanisms underlying differences in disease susceptibility will be explored at different levels. Improvement strategies for diseases including neo-natal mortality, gut and respiratory disorders, leg and metabolic disorders will be evaluated in farm scale tests, and data from diverse systems used to model whole-chain socioeconomic implications of disease states and their alleviation. The consortium has expertise in veterinary science and epidemiology, physiology and immunology, ge-netics, nutrition, socioeconomics, welfare and production science of pigs and poultry. The 10 academic, 1 association 4 industry and 7 SME partners cover the full European geographic range to derive meaningful epidemiological data and test interventions across diverse production circumstances. Dissemination activities will encompass all stakeholders in the food chain and establish new e-learning tools. PROHEALTH will deliver novel diagnostics for the propensity to develop production diseases and their occurrence, and multifactorial improvement strategies that can be applied to produce better quality products in a welfare friendly manner and improve competitiveness and sustainability of EU pig & poultry systems


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: HEALTH-2009-3.3-4 | Award Amount: 1.67M | Year: 2010

Mother-child cohorts are currently collecting a wealth of information on childhood diseases and their determinants across Europe, but these data are often of fragmented nature and there is little coordination to structure and consolidate scattered research. Although cohort research carries large potential policy implications, messages are not always filtering through to policy at the national, let alone the European, level. CHICOS aims to improve child health across Europe by developing an integrated strategy for mother-child cohort research. This will be achieved through the coordination of the most important European cohorts. The project will 1) make an overview of all mother-child cohorts in Europe; 2) evaluate existing information on outcomes and determinants from these cohorts, evaluate links between cohorts and routine registers, identify gaps in knowledge, and develop recommendations for research action at European level for the next 15 years focusing on key areas of policy concern; 3) review the extent to which mother-child cohorts and registries have contributed to current European child health policies and make recommendations to improve the contribution of mother-child cohort research to policy at the European level; and 4) disseminate results of the project to stakeholders and evaluate new technologies for cohort research dissemination. CHICOS is structured along key child health outcome themes (perinatal outcomes, asthma, obesity, cognitive and behavioural development, injuries, infections, childhood cancer) and key determinant themes (social inequalities, nutrition and exercise, lifestyle exposures, environmental toxin exposures, genetic factors and biobanks, multiple risk factors) where European cohorts can and should work together towards a more solid evidence base, which can be used by policy makers. CHICOS will work closely with policy makers to ensure that guidelines across Europe in these areas are based on the best available evidence.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: NoE | Phase: HEALTH.2010.2.3.2-3 | Award Amount: 15.96M | Year: 2011

Over the past 15 years, EU-funded cohorts and collaborations (EuroSIDA, CASCADE and PENTA), have played a central role in developing our understanding of HIV progression and the effects of ART, enabling European expertise to contribute directly to the advances in patient diagnosis and management worldwide, and providing a continued surveillance mechanism for detection of emerging problems at a European level. Furthermore, we also established COHERE (Collaboration Of HIV Epidemiologic Research in Europe), a new European-wide cohort collaboration encompassing virtually all European HIV cohorts which were not included in the EU-funded networks. COHERE provides us with sufficient statistical power to address questions that cannot be addressed by existing cohorts and networks alone. Together, these collaborations form the foundation of a proposed Network of Excellence, which we have named EuroCoord. EuroCoord currently has access to data from over 250,000 HIV-infected individuals across the European continent, and beyond, both male and female, from neonates to geriatric populations, infected through sex between men, sex between men and women, injecting drug use, nosocomially and from mother to child, with and without co-infection with hepatitis viruses, of different ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds, from indigenous and migrant populations, in settings with varying levels of access to care and laboratory techniques. Our multidisciplinary research will thus allow us to address key areas of HIV research aimed at improving the management and life of HIV-infected individuals, whilst allowing us to explore differences within sub-groups. EuroCoord is in a position to mobilise European HIV cohort research, bringing it within one truly pan-European network of cohort studies with a strong and increasing presence in the Central- and Eastern European region. The structure of our network, maintaining autonomy within each individual network but within one common research platform, ensures that the most competitive science is performed whilst allowing us to pool our expertise and resources to undertake new initiatives within an integrated collaborative structure.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2012.1.2-10 | Award Amount: 8.06M | Year: 2012

European aquaculture production provides direct employment to 65.000 people with a turnover of 3 billion . However, the lack of authorised veterinary medicinal products and the consequent disease outbreaks in farmed fish species costs the sector 20% of the production value. The most appropriate method for disease control, both on economical and ethical grounds, is disease prevention by vaccination. TargetFish will advance the development of existing (but not sufficient) and new prototype vaccines against socio-economically important viral or bacterial pathogens of Atlantic salmon, rainbow trout, common carp, sea bass, sea bream and turbot. The project will develop targeted vaccination strategies for currently sub-optimal and for novel vaccines. Improved vaccines will be brought closer to industrial application by addressing practical issues such as efficacy, safety and delivery route. TargetFish will also establish a knowledge- and technology-base for rational development of next generation fish vaccines. To achieve these challenging tasks, we brought together 29 partners from 11 EU member states, 2 associated countries and 1 International Cooperation Partner Country (ICPC). In this large multidisciplinary consortium an approximate equal number of RTD and SME partners will cooperate closely while keeping an intensive communication with the large vaccine and nutrition industries via an Industry Forum. Specifically, TargetFish will 1) generate knowledge by studying antigens and adjuvants for mucosal routes of administration while analyzing the underpinning protective immune mechanisms; 2) validate this knowledge with response assays for monitoring vaccine efficacy and study safety aspects, including those associated with DNA vaccines; 3) approach implementation of prototype vaccines by optimizing vaccination strategies thus 4) shortening the route to exploitation. Thereby, this project will greatly enhance targeted disease prophylaxis in European fish farming.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN | Award Amount: 4.17M | Year: 2012

The objective of the P4FIFTY project is to deliver a trans-European network of industrially oriented white biotechnologists fully trained in the application of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) for application in the chemical manufacturing and pharmaceutical industries. This will involve academic groups investigating P450 diversity exploration from the wild type enzymes and their genes, genome mining for novel P450s, the expression of these in suitable hosts, the enzymology and molecular biological manipulation of these (including directed evolution and high throughput screening [HTS] methods), the chemical application and finally the chemical and biochemical engineering aspects of application. These inputs are supported by two industrial partners one from the pharmaceutical industries (drug metabolism and synthesis) and one from the large scale chemical manufacturing industry.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-SICA | Phase: KBBE-2007-1-3-09 | Award Amount: 7.62M | Year: 2009

This project aims at Improving Human Health and Animal Production in developing countries through Integrated Control of Neglected Zoonoses in animals, based on Scientific Innovation and Public Engagement. Neglected zoonoses, such as anthrax, rabies, brucellosis, bovine TB, zoonotic trypanosomiasis, echinococcosis, cysticercosis and leishmaniasis, are major causes of ill-health in developing countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America. Production animals and companion animals of significant societal value act as reservoirs for transmission to man, and the burden of these diseases on affected communities is compounded by the adverse effects many diseases have on the productivity of livestock and hence the livelihoods of the poor. Control of these diseases in animals represents an opportunity to address the constraints they pose to both human health and animal productivity, thereby contributing to poverty reduction and the MDGs. Effective control in animals will require scientific innovation to identify and (where necessary) develop tools for diagnosis, for quantification of disease burdens, and for control. Public engagement at all stakeholder levels will be needed to ensure that strategies are appropriate for use in affected communities and are adopted within the policy framework of affected countries. The project will: (i) map and review research activities at a global level, (ii) survey and assess the burden of zoonoses in communities, (iii) improve or develop disease control tools as appropriate for conditions in affected countries, with private sector inputs where appropriate, (iv) develop cost-effective control and prevention strategies taking into account economic, sociological and cultural factors as well as traditional knowledge, (v) build capacity in ICPCs through technology transfer and training and (vi) empower communities and policy makers to utilise control and prevention strategies appropriately and effectively.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE.2012.2.1-01 | Award Amount: 3.83M | Year: 2012

Health-related symbols and claims may be potentially influential in supporting informed choice, furthering healthier consumer food choices, and strengthening competitiveness of the European food industry in bringing about food products that support a healthier lifestyle. However, current insights into how health symbols and claims are understood and used in real-world shopping situations are limited, making it difficult to derive recommendations on the wording and design of health claims and symbols, including the context in which these appear on the food label. The objectives of this project are to determine how health-related symbols and claims, in their context, are understood by consumers, and how they affect purchasing and consumption, taking into account both individual differences in needs and wants and country-specific differences with regard to use of health claims and symbols. Guidelines will be developed for EU policy directed towards health-related symbols and claims, and a set of methods will be developed that can be used by policy-makers and industry to assess the effects of health claims and symbols as these appear on the market. The project will draw heavily on the involvement of stakeholders from the whole food sector to ensure results with high practical relevance.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.66M | Year: 2016

The calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) is a class C Gprotein-coupled receptor that plays a pivotal role in systemic calcium metabolism by regulating parathyroid hormone secretion and urinary Ca excretion. Abnormal CaSR function is implicated in calciotropic disorders, and in non-calciotropic disorders such as Alzheimers disease (AD), cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes (DM), sarcopenia and cancer, which account for >25% of the global disease burden. The CaSR is a unique GPCR whose principal physiological ligand is the Ca2\ ion; it is expressed almost ubiquitously; interacts with multiple G subtypes regulating highly divergent downstream signalling pathways, depending on the cellular context. The CaSR Biomedicine is a fully translational project that utilises the concept of a single molecule, the CaSR, influencing a range of physiological and disease processes, to develop a unique, strong multidisciplinary and intersectoral scientific training programme preparing 14 young scientists to become specialists in GPCR biology and signalling. The objectives of CaSR Biomedicine are: 1. Educate and train Early Stage Researchers to become highly innovative scientists to enhance their career perspective. 2. Elucidate ligand- and tissue-dependent differences in CaSR physiology by examining its functions at cellular level and thus to contribute to the understanding of GPCR signalling in general. 3. Assess how CaSR function is altered in AD, CVD, DM, sarcopenia, and cancer, and to find innovative CaSR-based therapeutic approaches for these major, age-related disorders. 4. Establish long-lasting interdisciplinary and intersectoral cooperation among researchers and between researchers and industry, to strengthen the European Research Area. Therefore the CaSR Biomedicine will investigate the complexity of CaSR signalling and function to identify CaSR-based therapeutic approaches to diseases linked to changes in CaSR expression or function (AD, CVD, DM, sarcopenia, and cancer).


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH.2011.2.1.1-1 | Award Amount: 39.64M | Year: 2011

In response to the call for a high impact initiative on the human epigenome, the BLUEPRINT Consortium has been formed with the aim of generating at least 100 reference epigenomes and studying them to advance and exploit knowledge of the underlying biological processes and mechanisms in health and disease. BLUEPRINT will focus on distinct types of haematopoietic cells from healthy individuals and on their malignant leukaemic counterparts. Reference epigenomes will be generated by state-of-the-art technologies from highly purified cells for a comprehensive set of epigenetic marks in accordance with quality standards set by IHEC. This resource-generating activity will be conducted at dedicated centres to be complemented by confederated hypothesis-driven research into blood-based diseases, including common leukaemias and autoimmune disease (T1D), by epigenetic targets and compound identification, and by discovery and validation of epigenetic markers for diagnostic use. By focussing on 100 samples of known genetic variation BLUEPRINT will complete an epigenome-wide association study, maximizing the biomedical relevance of the reference epigenomes. Key to the success of BLUEPRINT will be the integration with other data sources (i.e. ICGC, 1000 genomes and ENCODE), comprehensive bioinformatic analysis, and user-friendly dissemination to the wider scientific community. The involvement of innovative companies will energize epigenomic research in the private sector by creating new targets for compounds and the development of smart technologies for better diagnostic tests. BLUEPRINT will outreach through a network of associated members and form critical alliances with leading networks in genomics and epigenomics within Europe and worldwide. Through its interdisciplinarity and scientific excellence combined with its strong commitment to networking, training and communication BLUEPRINT strives to become the cornerstone of the EU contribution to IHEC.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: NMP.2012.1.1-1 | Award Amount: 3.07M | Year: 2013

The main general goal of DECORE is to achieve the fundamental knowledge needed for the development of a fuel cell (FC) electrode, which can operate efficiently (both in terms of activity and selectivity) as the anode of a direct ethanol (EOH) FC (DEFC) in the temperature range between 150-200 C (intermediate-T). Such a technology is still lacking in the market. The choice for EOH as an alternative energy source is well founded on the abundance of bioethanol, and on the relatively simpler storage and use with respect to other energy carriers. The intermediate-T is required for an efficient and selective total conversion of EOH to CO2, so exploiting the maximum number of electrons in the DEFC. DECORE will explore the use of fully innovative supports (based on titanium oxycarbide, TiOxCy) and nano-catalysts (based on group 6 metal carbides, MCx, M=Mo,W), which have never been tested in literature as anodes for DEFCs. The new support is expected to be more durable than standard carbon supports at the targeted temperature. The innovative nano-catalysts would be noble-metal free, so reducing Europes reliance on imported precious metals. To tailor the needed materials, the active role of the support and nano-catalyst will be studied at atomic level. Demonstrating an activity of such nano-catalyst/support assembly at intermediate-T would open a novel route where DEFCs with strongly reduced production costs would have an impact on a fast industrialisation. The power range for the envisioned application is of the order of hundreds of Watts, i.e. the so called distributed generation, having an impact for devices such as weather stations, medical devices, signal units, auxiliary power units, gas sensors and security cameras. By the end of the project, a bench-top single DEFC operating at intermediate-T will be built and tested.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE.2013.2.4-01 | Award Amount: 11.53M | Year: 2014

Food Integrity the state of being whole, entire, or undiminished or in perfect condition. Providing assurance to consumers and other stakeholders about the safety, authenticity and quality of European food (integrity) is of prime importance in adding value to the European Agri-food economy. The integrity of European foods is under constant threat from fraudulently labelled imitations that try to exploit that added value. The FOODINTEGRITY project will directly address this issue and will be an international focal point for harmonisation and exploitation of research and technology for insuring the integrity of European food. Comprising an inner core of project participants from industry, academia, research institutes, technology providers and a global network of stakeholders, FOODINTEGRITY will rationalise and harmonise capability to provide a coherent structure and process for assuring the food supply. FOODINTEGRITY will: facilitate the sharing of information between stakeholder groups regarding European food integrity; establish processes for harmonising & exploiting existing databases; establish fit for purpose methodology to address stakeholder needs; identify and address research gaps by procuring and delivering 3M of commissioned projects; establish a self-sustaining Food-fraud early warning system for identifying emerging fraud risks; establish a self-sustaining worldwide network of stakeholders to ensure maximum uptake of the project legacy. Improved verification procedures will be developed for food control and industry stakeholders using 3 key commodities as exemplars: olive oil, spirit drinks & seafood. In addition a consumer study in China will assess their consumer attitudes in the face of substantial counterfeiting of European food. Finally it will establish expert food authenticity platforms that will supply independent expert opinion on food authenticity/food fraud to the European Commission, Codex and other national/international bodies


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IRSES | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-IRSES | Award Amount: 924.00K | Year: 2012

The proposed project aims at establishing a long-lasting collaboration and creates a network of European and Chinese research centres of excellence in the area of air quality and climate change studies. This aim will be achieved by undertaking joint research activities via collaboration facilitated by individual mobility of researchers between Europe and China. Accordingly, this network will contribute to strengthening and stimulating collaborative research between the partners, enhancing multidisciplinarity in the field of atmospheric chemistry by integrating experimental, theoretical and modelling and promoting mutual awareness for the environmental issues addressed by our scientific community. The network is also aimed at filling gaps in our knowledge in different areas which will increase our ability to further understand the atmospheric chemical processes impacting air quality and climate change. The proposal involves 14 partners from Europe and China (France:3, Germany:4, Spain:1, Denmark:1, China: 5). The research groups of this consortium bring together a fully complementary blend of field monitoring, laboratory measurement and modelling activities, which are not available in any single institution throughout the world. Hence, the training opportunities offered by the network, the built-in programmes, dedicated workshops, schools and exposure to internationally recognised research leaders will provide the early stage researches with significant career advantages. All groups are actively involved in a number of national, European or international projects. The proposed project responds to the key priorities for strengthening EU-China collaboration as identified in the S&T Agreement between the two parties.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENV.2013.6.1-1 | Award Amount: 12.17M | Year: 2013

Tropical Atlantic climate recently experienced pronounced shifts of great socio-economic importance. The oceanic changes were largest in the eastern boundary upwelling systems. African countries bordering the Atlantic strongly depend upon their ocean - societal development, fisheries, and tourism. They were strongly affected by these climatic changes and will face important adaptation challenges associated with global warming. Furthermore, these upwelling regions are also of great climatic importance, playing a key role in regulating global climate. Paradoxically, the Tropical Atlantic is a region of key uncertainty in earth-climate system: state-of-the-art climate models exhibit large systematic error, climate change projections are highly uncertain, and it is largely unknown how climate change will impact marine ecosystems. PREFACE aims to address these interconnected issues, and has the following goals: To reduce uncertainties in our knowledge of the functioning of Tropical Atlantic climate. To improve climate prediction and the quantification of climate change impacts in the region. To improve understanding of the cumulative effects of the multiple stressors of climate variability, greenhouse induced climate change, and fisheries on marine ecosystems, and ecosystem services (e.g., fisheries, coastal vulnerability). To assess the socio-economic vulnerabilities and evaluate the resilience of Atlantic African fishing communities to climate-driven ecosystem shifts and global markets. To meet these goals we bring together European and African expertise to combine regional and global scale modelling capabilities, field experiments and observation systems. Our target region includes areas more affected by climate change and by its consequences, European outermost regions, and African countries bordering the Atlantic.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: EURO-3-2014 | Award Amount: 2.85M | Year: 2015

TransSOL is committed to the systematic, interdisciplinary and praxis-oriented analysis of European solidarity in times of crisis. It has three overarching objectives: (a) it will map and analyse solidarity in Europe by means of a cross-national database that comprises three surveys addressing the general population, organized civil society, and claims-making in the media; (b) it will gather systematic data on the contextual factors and engage into political and legal analyses to ascertain the influence of the socio-economic, political, and legal context on solidarity, in particular the impact of the crisis, the EUs political responses and target-groups specific public policies; and (c) it will identify and develop best practices of transnational solidarity, draft evidence-based policy recommendations, and engage proactive dissemination and communication activities. The project comprises teams from Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Poland, Switzerland and the UK, including scientists from various disciplines and civil society practitioners, thus promising to deliver interdisciplinary and comparative analyses, knowledge-transfer and evidence-based, practicable recommendations. The project will enable us to address the three topics of the call. First, TransSOL will provide the first rigorous and comprehensive analysis of transnational solidarity in Europe, its main forms, conditioning factors (e.g., individual features as gender and social class, spatial inequalities, and contextual factors), and underlying conflicts about contending norms, identities, and interests. Secondly, the project will address the impact of Europes cultural diversity and multiple identities on European solidarity by analysing public claims-making and debates within the media. And finally, we engage into a critical reflection about adequate policy responses, in particular about the potentials of social investments balancing civic virtues of solidarity with public responsibilities.


Orlando L.,Copenhagen University | Cooper A.,University of Adelaide
Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics | Year: 2014

Ancient DNA provides a unique means to record genetic change through time and directly observe evolutionary and ecological processes. Although mostly based on mitochondrial DNA, the increasing availability of genomic sequences is leading to unprecedented levels of resolution. Temporal studies of population genetics have revealed dynamic patterns of change in many large vertebrates, featuring localized extinctions, migrations, and population bottlenecks. The pronounced climate cycles of the Late Pleistocene have played a key role, reducing the taxonomic and genetic diversity of many taxa and shaping modern populations. Importantly, the complex series of events revealed by ancient DNA data is seldom reflected in current biogeographic patterns. DNA preserved in ancient sediments and coprolites has been used to characterize a range of paleoenvironments and reconstruct functional relationships in paleoecological systems. In the near future, genome-level surveys of ancient populations will play an increasingly important role in revealing, calibrating, and testing evolutionary processes. © 2014 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: GERI-4-2014 | Award Amount: 2.46M | Year: 2015

The main goals of LIBRA are to implement innovative Gender Equality Plans (GEPs) that will empower women researchers to achieve successful careers in science, remove gender barriers and biases at an institutional level, and raise awareness of gender aspects in the experimental design of pre-clinical research projects. To achieve these goals we will: 1) conduct an initial external assessment of each partner organisation to identify gender bias at an institutional level, including a tailored version of the Gender Career-Family Implicit Association Test to analyse the current cultural and institutional attitudes towards gender issues; 2) design and implement innovative strategies to remove any identified biases or barriers, including the identification of best practices and subsequently the development of training programmes to improve the recruitment of women in science, the raising awareness of the central importance of including gender aspects in experimental design, mentoring schemes and family-friendly policies; and 3) define targets, agree on quantitative and qualitative indicators, monitor results, and ensure sustainability of the project. LIBRA will be in a position to impact gender equality and mainstreaming of sex and gender issues in research throughout Europe. It will contribute to the European Research Area objectives to boost womens careers, promoting their leadership in research and in decision-making processes. Our partners are also involved in other national and European (e.g. ERC working group on gender) initiatives, such that our results will also contribute to structural, institutional and sustainable changes well beyond the lifetime of the project.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INFRADEV-4-2014-2015 | Award Amount: 15.00M | Year: 2015

ENVRIPLUS is a cluster of research infrastructures (RIs) for Environmental and Earth System sciences, built around ESFRI roadmap and associating leading e-infrastructures and Integrating Activities together with technical specialist partners. ENVRIPLUS is driven by 3 overarching goals: 1) favoring cross-fertilization between infrastructures, 2) implementing innovative concepts and devices across RIs, and 3) facilitating research and innovation in the field of environment to an increasing number of users outside the RIs. ENVRIPLUS organizes its activities along a main strategic plan where sharing multi-disciplinary expertise will be most effective. It aims to improve Earth observation monitoring systems and strategies, including actions towards harmonization and innovation, to generate common solutions to many shared information technology and data related challenges, to harmonize policies for access and provide strategies for knowledge transfer amongst RIs. ENVRIPLUS develops guidelines to enhance trans-disciplinary use of data and data-products supported by applied use-cases involving RIs from different domains. ENVRIPLUS coordinates actions to improve communication and cooperation, addressing Environmental RIs at all levels, from management to end-users, implementing RI-staff exchange programs, generating material for RI personnel, and proposing common strategic developments and actions for enhancing services to users and evaluating the socio-economic impacts. ENVRIPLUS is expected to facilitate structuration and improve quality of services offered both within single RIs and at pan-RI level. It promotes efficient and multi-disciplinary research offering new opportunities to users, new tools to RI managers and new communication strategies for environmental RI communities. The produced solutions, services and other project results are made available to all environmental RI initiatives, thus contributing to the development of a consistent European RI ecosystem.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: EINFRA-4-2014 | Award Amount: 16.42M | Year: 2015

PRACE, the Partnership for Advanced Computing, was established in May 2010 as a permanent pan-European High Performance Computing service providing world-class systems for world-class science. Six systems at the highest performance level (Tier-0) are deployed by Germany, France, Italy and Spain providing researchers with over 9 billion core hours of compute time. HPC experts from twenty-five member states - funded in part in three implementation projects - enabled users from academia and industry to ascertain leadership and remain competitive in the Global Race. Currently PRACE is preparing for PRACE 2.0, the successor of the initial five year period. The objectives of PRACE-4IP are to build on and seamlessly continue the successes of PRACE and start new innovative and collaborative activities proposed by the consortium. These include: assisting the transition to PRACE 2.0; strengthening the internationally recognised PRACE brand; continuing advanced training which so far provided more than 15.000 person-training days to over 4700 persons, preparing strategies and best practices towards exascale computing, coordinating and enhancing the operation of the multi-tier HPC systems and services, and supporting users to exploit massively parallel systems and novel architectures. The proven project structure will be used to achieve each of the objectives in six dedicated work packages. The project will continue to be managed by Jlich. The activities are designed to increase Europes research and innovation potential especially through: seamless and efficient Tier-0 services and a pan-European HPC ecosystem including national capabilities; promoting take-up by industry and special offers to SMEs; analysing new flexible business models for PRACE 2.0; proposing strategies for deployment of leadership systems; collaborating with the ETP4HPC, the coming CoEs and other European and international organisations on future architectures, training, application support and policies.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2016 | Award Amount: 1.60M | Year: 2017

The GHaNA project aims to explore and characterize a new marine bioresource, for blue biotechnology applications in aquaculture, cosmetics and possibly food and health industry. The project will determine the biological and chemical diversity of Haslea diatoms to develop mass-scale production for viable industrial applications by maximising biomass production and associated high-value compound production, including terpenoids, marennine-like pigments, lipids and silica skeletons. The genus Haslea species type H. ostrearia, produces marennine, a water-soluble blue pigment used for greening oysters in Western France, which is also a bioactive molecule. Haslea diatoms have thus a high potential for use in (1) existing oyster farming, (2) production of pigments and bioactive compounds with natural antibacterial properties, (3) application as a colouring agent within industry, and (4) use of silica skeletons as inorganic biocharges in the formulation of new elastomeric materials. This will be achieved through fundamental and applied-oriented research to isolate fast- growing strains of Haslea, optimising their growth environment to increase marennine and other high-value compound productivity; to develop blue biotechnology specifically applied to benthic microalgae (biorefinery approach, processes); and to develop industrial exploitation of colouring and bioactive compounds through commercial activities of aquaculture, food, cosmetics and health.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: HEALTH.2010.3.4-3 | Award Amount: 1.90M | Year: 2011

The purpose of this project is to build sustainable capacity for research in blood transfusion services in Africa. There is a critical lack of individuals with research skills in Africas transfusion services; without these skills the service cannot do the research needed to improve the safety and supply of blood for their people. Blood transfusions in Africa are given predominantly for emergencies like bleeding during childbirth or severe anaemia due to malaria. In contracts, in wealthy countries demand for blood is predictable, transfusion services have centralised blood collection centres and effective distribution networks to hospitals where the blood is used. In Africa, the unpredictable blood use, severe blood shortages and difficulties in reaching remote hospitals means that research from wealthy countries may not apply to transfusion services in Africa. Therefore if African countries are to improve their blood transfusion services they need to generate their own evidence. Africas transfusion professionals have a wealth of technical expertise but almost no research experience. Several European institutions have expertise in building research capacity among health professionals in Africa. This project will coordinate EU and African collaborations to transfer research skills to the African partners. EU partners will benefit by enhancing their own blood transfusion research skills. To do this we will support three research training schemes (PhD, under/post graduates, in-service) in each of two African partner transfusion services. All partners will contribute to disseminating information about the project to both academic and non-academic audiences, promoting the uptake of research into policy and practice and in seeking long-term support for building transfusion research capacity in Africa. The AfSBT will coordinate the African partners activities and LSTM will have overall responsibility for the project.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: SiS.2011.1.0-1 | Award Amount: 4.55M | Year: 2011

Over the past decade, most EU Member States have identified food and health as key priorities. This is in response to increases in obesity and diet-related chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular diseases amongst their populations. Also an insufficient nutrient supply in subgroups of the populations and special demands in ageing societies are identified as abiding challenges. Attempts to increase public awareness of appropriate ways to eat more healthily though do not seem to have led to significant changes in patterns of food purchase and consumption. It has become obvious that the development of effective measures for improvement is a demanding task and requires further systematic research and innovative approaches. One main question that this research needs to tackle is the role that innovations in foods (e.g. improved nutrient preservation through the use of mild pathogen inactivation) and new basic research technologies (e.g. for gaining greater insight and understanding of the mechanisms underlying the effects of food intake on health) could play in counter-acting the alarming rise of food-related health problems. Advocating and promoting the production of knowledge that is close to the concerns of European citizens the European Commission has emphasized that simply inventing new technologies is not enough to overcome the pressing societal challenges in Europe (European Commission 2009). In the first place, it requires a purposeful communicative exchange between research, business, and civil society actors on the nature of the problem and the role that innovative products and technological approaches (besides or complementary with social measures) could play in tackling it.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SC5-06-2016-2017 | Award Amount: 5.88M | Year: 2016

EUCalc replies to topic a) Managing technology transition. The EUCalc project will deliver a much needed comprehensive framework for research, business, and decision making which enables an appraisal of synergies and trade-offs of feasible decarbonisation pathways on the national scale of Europe and its member countries \ Switzerland. The novel and pragmatic modelling approach is rooted between pure complex energy system and emissions models and integrated impact assessment tools, introduces an intermediate level of complexity and a multi-sector approach and is developed in a co-design process with scientific and societal actors. EUCalc explores decisions made in different sectors, like power generation, transport, industry, agriculture, energy usage and lifestyles in terms of climatological, societal, and economic consequences. For politicians at European and member state level, stakeholders and innovators EUCalc will therefore provide a Transition Pathways Explorer, which can be used as a much more concrete planning tool for the needed technological and societal challenges, associated inertia and lock-in effects. EUCalc will enable to address EU sustainability challenges in a pragmatic way without compromising on scientific rigour. It is meant to become a widely used democratic tool for policy and decision making. It will close - based on sound model components - a gap between actual climate-energy-system models and an increasing demands of decision makers for information at short notice. This will be supported by involving an extended number of decision-makers from policy and business as well as other stakeholders through expert consultations and the co-design of a Transition Pathways Explorer, a My Europe 2050 education tool and a Massive Open Online Course.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2016 | Award Amount: 549.00K | Year: 2017

This two-year project involves an international and inter-sector research and training network that focuses on the potential of makerspaces, which are specific spaces that enable creative design and the production of both digital and non-digital artefacts, to foster the digital literacy and creative skills of young children. A key aim of the project is to inform educational policy and practice in this area, enabling formal learning institutions (early years settings and primary schools) to learn from practice in non-formal learning spaces, and vice-versa, and also to foster innovation and entrepreneurship in the makerspace sector, enabling SMEs to develop robust business models and appropriate resources for future work in this area. The project involves 16 academic and non-academic beneficiaries and 10 non-academic, non-beneficiary partners across 6 EU countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Romania, UK), an Associated Country (Colombia) and 4 Third Countries (Australia, Canada, South Africa and USA). This global network of university scholars, cultural industry partners in makerspaces, early years practitioners, museum educators and librarians will engage in a collaborative research and training programme that addresses 4 objectives, which are to: 1. Conduct a comprehensive review of the role of makerspaces in the formal and non-formal educational experiences of children and young people. 2. Undertake empirical research to determine how makerspaces can foster the digital literacy and creativity skills and knowledge of young children. 3. Develop a conceptual framework for analysing young childrens engagement in makerspaces. 4. Make recommendations for policy and practice that will foster innovation and entrepreneurship in SME makerspaces and facilitate the use of makerspaces for enhancing digital literacy in early childhood educational institutions and non-formal learning spaces.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INFRAIA-01-2016-2017 | Award Amount: 10.01M | Year: 2017

Europe has become a global leader in optical-near infrared astronomy through excellence in space and ground-based experimental and theoretical research. While the major infrastructures are delivered through major national and multi-national agencies (ESO, ESA) their continuing scientific competitiveness requires a strong community of scientists and technologists distributed across Europes nations. OPTICON has a proven record supporting European astrophysical excellence through development of new technologies, through training of new people, through delivering open access to the best infrastructures, and through strategic planning for future requirements in technology, innovative research methodologies, and trans-national coordination. Europes scientific excellence depends on continuing effort developing and supporting the distributed expertise across Europe - this is essential to develop and implement new technologies and ensure instrumentation and infrastructures remain cutting edge. Excellence depends on continuing effort to strengthen and broaden the community, through networking initiatives to include and then consolidate European communities with more limited science expertise. Excellence builds on training actions to qualify scientists from European communities which lack national access to state of the art research infrastructures to compete successfully for use of the best available facilities. Excellence depends on access programmes which enable all European scientists to access the best infrastructures needs-blind, purely on competitive merit. Global competitiveness and the future of the community require early planning of long-term sustainability, awareness of potentially disruptive technologies, and new approaches to the use of national-scale infrastructures under remote or robotic control. OPTICON will continue to promote this excellence, global competitiveness and long-term strategic planning.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: EINFRA-11-2016 | Award Amount: 16.11M | Year: 2017

PRACE, the Partnership for Advanced Computing is the permanent pan-European High Performance Computing service providing world-class systems for world-class science. Systems at the highest performance level (Tier-0) are deployed by Germany, France, Italy and Spain providing researchers with over 11 billion core hours of compute time. HPC experts from 25 member states enabled users from academia and industry to ascertain leadership and remain competitive in the Global Race. Currently PRACE is in transition to PRACE 2, the successor of the initial five year period. The objectives of PRACE-5IP are to build on and seamlessly continue the successes of PRACE and start new innovative and collaborative activities proposed by the consortium. These include: assisting the transition to PRACE 2 including an analysis of Trans National Access; strengthening the internationally recognised PRACE brand; continuing and extend advanced training which so far provided more than 18 800 persontraining days; preparing strategies and best practices towards Exascale computing; coordinating and enhancing the operation of the multi-tier HPC systems and services; and supporting users to exploit massively parallel systems and novel architectures. A high level Service Catalogue is provided. The proven project structure will be used to achieve each of the objectives in 6 dedicated work packages. The activities are designed to increase Europes research and innovation potential especially through: seamless and efficient Tier-0 services and a pan-European HPC ecosystem including national capabilities; promoting take-up by industry and new communities and special offers to SMEs; implementing a new flexible business model for PRACE 2; proposing strategies for deployment of leadership systems; collaborating with the ETP4HPC, CoEs and other European and international organisations on future architectures, training, application support and policies. This will be monitored through a set of KPIs.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2010-ITN | Award Amount: 3.39M | Year: 2011

Plant cell walls constitute a highly complex and dynamic entity of extreme importance in plant growth and development. Growing cell walls can be considered as fibre composites, where cellulose microfibrils are embedded in a matrix of complex glycans. It is becoming increasingly apparent (i) that cell wall glycans are diverse in structural terms, (ii) that these structures are developmentally regulated, and (iii) that not all cell walls in an organ are comprised of the same configurations of glycans. The architecture of plant cell walls is governed by the fine structure of their constitutive polymers, this fine structure having profound effects on polymers functional properties after extraction or in planta. The immense complexity and spatial & temporal versatility of cell wall glycans render a full understanding of their structure-function relationships extremely challenging for plant biology research and for the uses of cell wall-derived materials in industrial contexts. WallTraC has thereby two major interlinked strategic objectives: (i) To develop new molecular tools & techniques for the analysis of plant cell walls & their component polymers - mainly pectin and cellulose - with direct applicability to industrial end-users in the functional food ingredients & plant fibre sectors; (ii) To provide high quality, inter-sectorial & trans-disciplinary training in plant cell wall analysis & complementary skills with the aim of enabling young scientists to respond to future demands in both academic and private sectors thereby securing the future EU expertise base. The WallTraC consortium gathers leading researchers on plant cell walls from the private sector, universities & research centres and will provide world-class infrastructures for research & training. This network of scientists, from distinct but complementary disciplines, will collectively allow the dissection of plant cell wall structures as a prelude to their industrial exploitation.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN | Award Amount: 3.94M | Year: 2012

Novel statistical methodology promises to greatly facilitate development of approaches for personalised medicine. While state-of-the-art statistical techniques have already advanced clinical trials and diagnostic/prognostic studies as the major source of evidence in clinical medicine, increasing availability of molecular techniques holds an even greater promise. However, for leveraging such information for individualised diagnosis/prognosis, and treatment, the corresponding complex structures have to be adequately modelled and results have to be aggregated by corresponding advanced meta-analytic approaches. The main goal of the project is to establish a joint research-training programme by an interdisciplinary and intersectorial network for providing early-stage researchers with deep insight into cutting-edge statistical methodology. The research area of statistical methodology for diagnostic/prognostic and therapeutic studies and systematic reviews is well suited for early-stage training purposes, as it comprises a wide range of theoretical and applied biostatistical tools that need to be mastered, further developed, and translated into clinical research and practice. Europe-wide exchanges will also be ensured to meet the need for mobility in todays globalised society. Further career relevant knowledge and skills will be provided through a structured design of education. The early-stage researchers will be trained according to an individually supervised, comprehensive and complementary programme. The structure of these activities is based on the training-through-research approach of the network. The collaboration of leading biostatistical experts will stimulate the discovery of promising statistical methodology useful for the design and analysis of clinical research. The integration of full industry partners and clinical advisors in the network enables optimal conditions for research driven by application, which will ensure tangible benefits of the programme.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP-2009-4.0-3 | Award Amount: 11.70M | Year: 2010

Medical diagnosis is currently undergoing a major revolution due to the fast discovery of molecular biomarkers, and the development of multimodal metabiomarker signatures. Progress, however, is hindered by low abundance of many biomarkers of interest in body fluids, in absolute concentration and with regard to other biomolecules. The aim of the present project is to apply these progresses in biotechnology, nanoparticle synthesis, and nano-instrumentation to the development of fully integrated lab-on chip instruments able to perform elaborate multimodal biomarker analysis on a routine basis and at the ultrasensitive level required to allow minimally invasive tests. In particular, we aim at overcoming a major bottleneck on the path to this objective, which was identified in a previous project in the HEALTH priority: no satisfactory solution currently exists to bridge the several orders of magnitude between the nanoscale volumes at which ultrasensitive new generation sensors operate, and the often millilitre volumes of samples in which the molecules of interest must be found. For this, we shall combine innovations in pre-concentration, micro and nanofluidics, self-assembly, micro-nanofabrication, and nanodetection. The project will develop a generic, multipurpose, platform of compatible enabling technologies, and integrate them into devices. In order to maximize impact and societal benefit, the project will be validated on an application of major interest for health, namely the early detection of biomarkers for neurodegenerative diseases (including Alzheimer), with special emphasis on subtyping of these diseases for improved treatment strategies. The consortium includes a multidisciplinary group of technology developers, three leading biomedical groups in clinical neuroscience for definition of specifications and end-user pre-clinical validation, and three research-oriented SMEs in biotechnology, nanosensing and microfluidics.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: SIS-2008-2.2.1.1 | Award Amount: 5.24M | Year: 2009

Helping teachers raise the quality of science teaching and its educational environment has the potential to increase student engagement, attainment, scientific literacy and science career choices. S-TEAM will achieve this by connecting existing science education research and teacher knowledge to teacher education. This task requires the power of coordinated action across a wide range of institutions and national contexts. The 26 partners and 15 nations engaged in S-TEAM have a unique opportunity to systematically integrate their knowledge of teaching, research and teacher education, and to adapt science education to the diverse needs of citizens and the economy in Europe, focusing on inquiry-based methods. These involve problem-solving, hands-on experimentation, authentic, student-led content and critical dialogue, but they require wider development of teacher skills and knowledge. Many teachers are already competent in these methods, and are thus the best source of learning for others. S-TEAM will achieve its aims by disseminating research on, and teachers' experiences of inquiry-based methods to existing and future science teachers. Its actions will involve listening to teachers, working with teacher educators and researchers, and providing support for better science education. This support will include workshops, training packages, video case-studies, teaching materials and publications. S-TEAM will involve not only teachers, but also teacher educators, researchers, students, parents and policymakers in dialogue, to ensure that this dissemination is effective. S-TEAM is sustainable since learning through teacher collaboration and education can be continually regenerated, but also necessary because science teacher education needs to be shared across Europe. By enabling teachers to deliver more efficient and efficacious learning, S-TEAM will improve the attitudes, motivation and learning of young people, including girls, in science education.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: ENV.2010.2.1.5-1 | Award Amount: 4.40M | Year: 2010

The social and economic impact of natural disasters in emerging economies and developing countries is growing. Many African countries have fragile economies unable to absorb the shocks caused by natural disasters enhanced by the increasing vulnerability of rapidly expanding urban areas. Climate change is likely to rapidly exacerbate this situation. The overall objective of CLUVA is to develop methods and knowledge to be applied to African cities to manage climate risks, to reduce vulnerabilities and to improve coping capacity and resilience towards climate changes. CLUVA will explore these issues in selected African cities (Addis Ababa, Dar es Salaam, Douala, Ougadougou, St.Louis). The project aims at improving the capacity of scientific institutions, local councils and civil society to cope with climate change. CLUVA will assess the environmental, social and economic impacts and the risks of climate change induced hazards expected to affect urban areas (floods, sea-level rise, storm surges, droughts, heat waves, desertification, storms and fires) at various time frames. The project will develop innovative climate change risk adaptation strategies based on strong interdisciplinary components. CLUVA will be conducted by a balanced partnership of European and African partners. The 7 European partners will bring together some of EUs leading experts in climate, quantitative hazard and risk assessment, risk management, urban planners and social scientists. The 6 African partners from South Africa and from the Universities of the selected cities cover a similar range of expertises, making possible an effective integrated research effort. The project is structured in 6 WorkPackages dealing with climate change and impact models (WP1), multiple vulnerability (WP2), urban planning and governance as key issues to increase the resilience (WP3), capacity building and dissemination (WP4), coordination of the activities in the selected cities (WP5) and project management (WP6).


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE.2013.2.2-03 | Award Amount: 7.95M | Year: 2013

Vitamin D deficiency has significant implications for human health and impacts on healthy growth and development and successful aging. Fundamental knowledge gaps are barriers to implementing a safe and effective public health strategy to prevent vitamin D deficiency and optimize status. ODIN will provide the evidence to prevent vitamin D deficiency in Europe and improve nutrition and public health through food. By establishing an internationally standardized analytical platform for 25OHD, ODIN will measure the distribution of circulating 25OHD and describe the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in Europe. Using available biobanks and databases from National nutrition surveys ODIN will delineate the relative contributions of sun and dietary sources of vitamin D to circulating 25OHD. In support of planned EFSA revisions of vitamin D recommendations, ODIN will carry out three RCT in pregnant women, children and teenagers and a fourth RCT in ethnic immigrant groups to provide experimental data to specify vitamin D intake requirements. Using dietary modeling, innovative food-based solutions to increase vitamin D in the food supply through a combination of bio-fortification of meats, fish, eggs, mushrooms and yeast will be developed and ODIN will test the efficacy and safety of these products in food-based RCT varying in scale from small product-specific trials to a large total diet study in vulnerable indigenous and immigrant sub-groups. ODIN has assembled the largest critical mass of prospective adult, pregnancy and birth cohort studies to date and will conduct meta-analyses and individual subject-level meta-regression analyses to integrate standardized data on vitamin D status, a priori defined clinical endpoints and genotype to examine relationships between vitamin D and human health, including beneficial and adverse effects, on perinatal outcomes, bone growth and body composition and allergic disease in children and cardiovascular disease and mortality in adults.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: KBBE.2011.2.2-04 | Award Amount: 2.33M | Year: 2012

Interventions to improve nutritional status are of critical importance to achieve Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Micronutrient deficiencies, mainly iron, zinc, vitamin A and iodine deficiencies affect billions of people worldwide, are responsible for more than one million child deaths per year and prevent a third of the worlds children from reaching their intellectual and physical potential. The SMILING project Sustainable Micronutrient Interventions to controL deficiencies and Improved Nutritional status and General health in Asia will produce a new, feasible and sustainable nutrition intervention agenda, which will be country-specific and directed to women of reproductive age (non-pregnant women, pregnant and lactating women) and young children under 2 years of age. The project focuses specifically on the South-East Asian region because of the diversity in the extent and severity of malnutrition in that region and on the diversity of political, economic, social and cultural contexts. The SMILING proposal deliberately avoids expressing pre-conceived views on which interventions should be prioritized currently or in the future as the deliverables of the Action will reflect the views and opinions of a wide range of stakeholders in the region who will be consulted during the project. The ultimate objective of the Action is to integrate priorities for appropriate, efficient, feasible and sustainable interventions to improve micronutrient status, health and development of women of reproductive age and young children primarily into the national policies of the five target countries in SE Asia and in the agenda of the civil society, private sector, international organizations and NGOs. The goal is not only protecting people from hunger but also to guaranty food and nutritional security to these most vulnerable groups, thereby contributing directly to MDG1, MDG5 and MDG4 and as well by extension to MDG2 and MDG6.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-23-2014 | Award Amount: 5.99M | Year: 2015

ADVOCATE brings together top principal investigators from prestigious universities, the public sector, and the private sector to address the most common diseases affecting humanity, as measured by the recent Global Burden of Disease Study. ADVOCATE strives to optimise delivery of oral health and wellbeing to the population in EU Member States. This requires a change in oral health care delivery towards prevention. The change will be achieved by developing a model that promotes a preventive rather than restorative oral health care system: The oral health care model 2020. As the oral health care delivery system is not as overly complex as other health care systems, the oral health care model 2020 may serve as a blueprint for other health care system reforms. The development of this model requires intensive information exchange and engagement of stakeholders to establish a set of key-indicators. These indicators will be used to benchmark health care performance on practice as well as system level. Two types of evidence-based indicators will be selected: Quantitative and qualitative indicators that allow measuring and influencing of either intrinsic motivation or extrinsic motivation incentives towards a patient centred, resilient and prevention oriented oral health care system. ADVOCATE will test this model in a natural environment, and provide evidence-informed policy measures towards its implementation, both for oral health care systems as well as other health care systems. Given the comprehensiveness of the topic, ADVOCATE uses a targeted approach that is entirely focused on the five major root-causes underlying the current suboptimal performance of oral health care systems. Moreover, ADVOCATE has confirmed access to data of eight European oral health care databases; it is well connected to existing initiatives and networks, and has ample support from preventive oriented industry, as exemplified by the financial support provided for the final conference.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: BBSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 636.76K | Year: 2014

Great advances have been made in the development of proto-cells based on giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). However, one essential functional element of all living cells still to be incorporated into such systems is a glycocalyx. This coating of complex carbohydrates extends up to 100 nm from the cell membrane and provides an adhesive layer that mediates interactions between different cell types, viruses and signalling molecules. In most cases, these interactions involve specific carbohydrate-binding proteins (lectins) which may be either soluble or membrane-bound. For example, fertilisation is initiated by a specific carbohydrate on the surface of the egg adhering to a specific lectin on the head of the sperm. Protein-carbohydrate interactions also mediate the endocytosis of many bacteria, viruses and bacterial toxins which stick to specific glycolipids on the cell membrane. Protein-carbohydrate interactions thus present a general strategy for enabling cell adhesion and cell entry. In this project we will design and create a modular toolbox of synthetic glcocalyx components and engineered lectins that will be attached to lipid membranes to enable reversible proto-cell adhesion and incorporated into virus-like particles to mediate proto-cell entry. The methodology will be exemplified through the construction of proto-cells that contain proto-organelles and the assembly and remodelling of proto-tissues in which multiple types of proto-cells are brought together in a pre-defined fashion to create more complex systems.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: KBBE.2010.2.6-01 | Award Amount: 1.17M | Year: 2011

The proposed Coordination and support actions (Coordinating, CSA) has the overall objective to disseminate state-of-the-art research results in food safety and quality topics through a series of symposia, expert working group meetings, an online platform with best practise examples and coordination of cooperation and a plan for the preparation of future activities. In addition to the aim of disseminating research results of finalised and current EC funded projects from FP6 and FP7 and other projects focusing on food safety, the consortium will develop strategies and recommendations for European policies (e.g.: food, consumers, research, health, agriculture). The secure handling of food has main impact onto the safety of food products and the European consumers. Furthermore, detailed plans and actions to foster food safety research in Europe are part of the workplan and objectives. The CSA action will pave the way for highly innovative research projects in the field of food safety. FOODSEG will connect research and policy actors in the enlarged European Union and the Candidate countries, in order to fill transitional gaps and achieve a broader network and deeper collaboration between them. The following map gives an overview of the FOODSEG consortium and the very broad network which covers nearly all regions of the enlarged European Union, Candidate countries and also third countries.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2012.1.2-03 | Award Amount: 7.69M | Year: 2012

BIOFECTOR is an integrated project that develops alternative fertilisation strategies by the use of various bio-effectors (BEs, plant growth promoting microorganisms and natural extraction products). BEs stimulate root growth, solubilise and mineralise sparingly available nutrients, or protect plants from abiotic and biotic stresses. Novel BEs will be isolated, characterized and applied in strategic combination with alternative fertilisation strategies that include organic and low-input farming, use of waste recycling fertilizers, and fertiliser-placement technologies. Bio-effectors addressed comprise fungal strains of Trichoderma, Penicillium and Sebacinales, as well as bacterial strains of Bacillus and Pseudomonades with well-characterized root growth promoting and nutrient solubilising potential. Natural extraction products of seaweed, compost and plant extracts, as well as their purified active compounds are also tested in various combinations. Maize, wheat and tomato are chosen as representative crops. Laboratory and European-wide field experiments assure product adaptation to divers geo-climatic conditions. Viable alternatives to the conventional practice of mineral fertilisation are developed, towards environmental friendly agricultural practice with reduced agrochemical input.


CosmoPHOS-nano is a multidisciplinary, translational and business-oriented project, aiming to accomplish the following objectives: 1) develop the CosmoPHOS system, which is a novel theranostic (diagnostic & therapeutic) nanotechnology-enabled portable combination system enabling endovascular in vivo near-infrared fluorescence molecular imaging, endovascular near-infrared targeted photodynamic therapy, real-time & follow-up therapy monitoring of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD), 2) nonclinically evaluate this system, 3) clinically validate the system after regulatory approval, & 4) reduce in the long-term CAD deaths and morbidity by up to 40%, resulting in a significant decrease of the European and global healthcare costs for CAD, increasing the income of the European healthcare industry from CAD market which is the global largest. The CosmoPHOS-nano consortium has a five year history of successful collaboration between the industrial and academic partners, and its funding would underpin a team devoted to delivering a novel powerful & affordable healthcare solution against the leading cause of death, without the need for heavy and expensive medical equipment. The CosmoPHOS system consists of two interacting components: a) targeted theranostic near-infrared photoactivatable biocompatible nanomedicines, and b) medical devices. After systemic administration, the nanomedicines targeted accumulate in coronary atherosclerotic plaques, followed by endocoronary photoactivation and detection by the medical devices, enabling molecular imaging, targeted therapy, real-time & follow-up therapy monitoring of CAD. Preliminary in vitro & in vivo successful experimental results, as well as parts of the CosmoPHOS system are already available from the prior five year collaboration. The project plan includes: A) nonclinical R&D (30 months); B) nonclinical validation & regulatory approval (18 months); C) first-in-man phase-I clinical trial in 20 CAD patients (12 months).


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SFS-04-2014 | Award Amount: 5.31M | Year: 2015

LANDMARK is a pan-European multi-actor consortium of leading academic and applied research institutes, chambers of agriculture and policy makers that will develop a coherent framework for soil management aimed at sustainable food production across Europe. The LANDMARK proposal builds on the concept that soils are a finite resource that provides a range of ecosystem services known as soil functions. Functions relating to agriculture include: primary productivity, water regulation & purification, carbon-sequestration & regulation, habitat for biodiversity and nutrient provision & cycling. Trade-offs between these functions may occur: for example, management aimed at maximising primary production may inadvertently affect the water purification or habitat functions. This has led to conflicting management recommendations and policy initiatives. There is now an urgent need to develop a coherent scientific and practical framework for the sustainable management of soils. LANDMARK will uniquely respond to the breadth of this challenge by delivering (through multi-actor development): 1. LOCAL SCALE: A toolkit for farmers with cost-effective, practical measures for sustainable (and context specific) soil management. 2. REGIONAL SCALE - A blueprint for a soil monitoring scheme, using harmonised indicators: this will facilitate the assessment of soil functions for different soil types and land-uses for all major EU climatic zones. 3. EU SCALE An assessment of EU policy instruments for incentivising sustainable land management. There have been many individual research initiatives that either address the management & assessment of individual soil functions, or address multiple soil functions, but only at local scales. LANDMARK will build on these existing R&D initiatives: the consortium partners bring together a wide range of significant national and EU datasets, with the ambition of developing an interdisciplinary scientific framework for sustainable soil management.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2011-2.3.2. | Award Amount: 13.73M | Year: 2012

The ESFRI infrastructures in Biological and BioMedical Sciences face substantial challenges in accessing and sharing data and resources. The BioMedBridges consortium brings together the six established ESFRI infrastructures with common goals to define, implement and deliver data interoperability across the biological and biomedical domains. The first objective is to ensure that interoperable standards are available across all data resources and services shared by two of more ESFRI infrastructure. The identified standards will be implemented to enable data interoperation between ESFRI projects in biomedical sciences. Public data in life sciences will be freely accessible through these standard interoperable services. Private data, however, is a major concern in this domain, for medical information or for data with intellectual property issues. Where projects need to share sensitive data, standards for secure and restricted access will be identified and implemented. BioMedBridges is a practical solution to the data interoperability requirements of infrastructures in the biological and biomedical domains. A suite of use cases will guide the development and deployment of standards and services with emphasis on the issues arising between specific projects. These may cover the exchange of biomedical and genetic data, linking mouse model organism data with human clinical information, and the deposition of large volumes of data from one project to another. BioMedBridges is inclusive of emerging infrastructures which can contribute additional data classes and challenges such as bioimaging, ecosystems, small molecules and infectious diseases. The ESFRI infrastructures leading BioMedBridges are ELIXIR, BBMRI, EATRIS, ECRIN, InfraFrontier and INSTRUCT.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE.2013.1.2-01 | Award Amount: 8.01M | Year: 2014

Agroforestry is the practice of deliberately integrating woody vegetation (trees or shrubs) with crop and/or animal systems to benefit from the resulting ecological and economic interactions. AGFORWARD (AGroFORestry that Will Advance Rural Development) is a four-year project, developed by 23 organisations at the forefront of agroforestry research, practice and promotion in Europe, with the goal of promoting appropriate agroforestry practices that advance sustainable rural development. The project will i) increase our understanding of existing, and new extensive and intensive agroforestry systems in Europe; ii) identify, develop and demonstrate innovations to improve the ecosystem service benefits and viability of agroforestry systems in Europe using participatory research, iii) develop better adapted designs and practices for the different soil and climatic conditions of Europe, and iv) promote the wide adoption of sustainable agroforestry systems. Successful and sustainable agroforestry practices are best developed by farmers and land owners working in partnership with researchers, extension staff, and other rural businesses. AGFORWARD will facilitate 33 participative agroforestry research and development stakeholder groups to improve the resilience of i) existing agroforestry systems of high nature and cultural value such as the dehesa and montado; and ii) olive, traditional orchard, and other high value tree systems, and the sustainability of iii) arable and iv) livestock systems with the integration of trees. Using existing bio-economic models, AGFORWARD will evaluate and adapt the innovations to improve the delivery of positive ecosystem services and business profitability at farm- and landscape-scales across Europe. By using and developing existing European fora, such as the European Agroforestry Federation, AGFORWARD will implement an informative and effective promotion programme to benefit the European economy, environment and society.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 2.84M | Year: 2015

List_MAPS is a network dedicated to the training of innovative young researchers in the field of Microbiology and Systems Biology. It focuses on Listeria monocytogenes, an ubiquitous pathogen that is in the EU the leading cause of mortality and food recalls due to foodborne pathogens, costing the EU millions of euro per annum in medical care and associated costs in the food sector. ESRs will develop scientific expertise through PhD training, mobility of researchers, summer schools, workshops and transfer-of-knowledge in the areas of Transcriptomics, Proteomics, Sequencing and Systems Biology. Working in this dynamic state-of-the-art field will provide for training of ESRs to the highest level, with co-operation and movement between academia and industry that will enhance ESR training. The overall objective of the research programme is to tackle food safety through the combination of high throughput Epigenetics, Deep sequencing of transcripts, Proteomics, Bioinformatics, Mathematics and Microbiology to decipher the transcriptional regulatory circuitry that drives adaptation and virulence of L. monocytogenes from farm to fork. This information will be exploited to understand how environmental conditions and food composition can influence GI tract adaptation/virulence and to develop an innovative transcriptome-based tool to assess in silico the virulence of large collections of isolates. This developed tool aims at replacing the currently used burdensome animal models. In addition to excellent scientific competences, competitive research requires a range of transferable skills to secure funding, optimise management of working teams and exploit research results. List_MAPS proposes an innovative approach to the training of ESRs in these transferable skills, combining socio-constructivist learning theory with Open Educational Resources to design and provide blended learning courses. This will secure world-class training for creative, entrepreneurial and innovative ESRs.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH.2011.2.3.1-2 | Award Amount: 16.04M | Year: 2011

Antibiotics are essential therapeutics in the treatment of bacterial infections. However, the indiscriminate use of antibiotics has led to the emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria that pose a major threat to human health as options for treating infections by these bacteria have become limited. The evolution, emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance genes are still only poorly understood and expanding our knowledge on these aspects will provide novel leads to combat the emergence of antibiotic resistance. The EvoTAR consortium gathers a multi-disciplinary group of leading European researchers in the fields of antibiotic resistance, microbial genomics and mathematical modelling. In addition, three research-intensive SMEs participate in EvoTAR, two of which are involved in the development of novel approaches to minimize the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance. The purpose of EvoTAR is to increase the understanding of the evolution and spread of antibiotic resistance in human pathogens. EvoTAR will characterise the human reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes (the resistome) by investigating the dynamics and evolution of the interaction between resistant and non-resistant bacteria from the human microbiome and the interrelations of the human resistome with non-human reservoirs of resistance genes. Novel methods will be used to quantify resistance transfer under controlled conditions in gene exchange communities. Mathematical modelling will be applied to predict gene flow between different reservoirs and to predict future resistance trends. Novel in vitro and in vivo models will allow the study of the efficacy of novel therapeutics aimed at reducing selection and spread of antibiotic resistance. The EvoTAR project will generate novel insights into the evolution and spread of antibiotic resistance genes and thereby create opportunities for the development of novel interventions to curb the rising tide of antibiotic resistance in human pathogens.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: ENV.2010.2.1.4-1 | Award Amount: 9.23M | Year: 2010

FunDivEUROPE (FUNctional significance of forest bioDIVersity in EUROPE) proposes to quantify the effects of forest biodiversity on ecosystem function and services in major European forest types in the main bioclimatic regions of Europe. FunDivEUROPE will be based on four scientific platforms and seven cross-cutting Work Packages. The project will combine a global network of tree diversity experiments (Experimental Platform) with a newly designed network of observational plots in six focal regions within Europe (Exploratory Platform). Additionally, the project will integrate an in-depth analysis of inventory-based datasets of existing forest monitoring networks to extend the scope to larger spatial and temporal scales (Inventory Platform). FunDivEUROPE will thus combine the strengths of various scientific approaches to explore and quantify the significance of forest biodiversity for a very large range of ecosystem processes and ecosystem services. Using modeling and state-of-the-art techniques for quantitative synthesis, the project will integrate information gained from the different platforms to assess the performance of pure and mixed species stands under changing climate. In addition to the three research platforms, FunDivEUROPE will set up a Knowledge Transfer Platform in order to foster communication, aggregation and synthesis of individual findings in the Work Packages and communication with stakeholders, policy makers and the wider public. The information gained should thus enable forest owners, forest managers and forest policy makers to adapt policies and management for sustainable use of forest ecosystems in a changing environment, capitalizing on the potential effects of biodiversity for ecosystem functioning. The experiences gained within FunDivEUROPE will finally allow contributing to the development of the European Long-Term Ecosystem Research Network, complementing existing forest observation and monitoring networks.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2008.3.2.2 | Award Amount: 16.16M | Year: 2009

The aim of this project is to bring the patented Inbicon Core technology for 2nd generation bio-ethanol production from a pre-commercial to a full commercial level, making the technology available in the market and attractive to investors in 4 5 years. The technology was developed in steps (also partly EU funded) and now a 4 t/hr biomass to ethanol plant is being built in Kalundborg in Denmark. The plant will be in operation in the fall of 2009 and will produce 5 million litres of ethanol annually. More than 10 years of development has brought about a robust process capable of producing substantial quantities of ethanol from biomass. The next necessary step is to reduce the production costs, thus making the process feasible. In this proposal we apply for funding to demonstrate the 4 t/hr at industrial scale and optimise the plant to lower the production costs for ethanol through: Improving the capacity of the plant, reducing the energy consumption and water balance, adding a fermentation step for C5 sugars and recycle the enzymes in the process. Ultimately we will improve the capacity of the plant to become a 8-10 t/hr plant by developing the process from being partly continuous to operate in a truly commercial continuous mode. We expect this to result in a significant cost-cut in ethanol production expenses. The ethanol produced will be characterized and tested in engine test-rigs and in car-fleet, thus covering the whole value chain from the straw entrance to the gate of the ethanol plant production to end-users in cars. The process will be assessed from an environmental perspective through LCA analysis and results will be published for scientific purpose and for expanding the use of the technology to use for future business partners. The team of partners in this project are those who have a relevant business role in the demonstration of this value chain, a research center and universities with competences in key areas.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE.2012.2.2-03 | Award Amount: 14.15M | Year: 2013

The primary goal of PREVIEW is to identify the most efficient lifestyle pattern for the prevention of type-2 diabetes in a population of pre-diabetic overweight or obese individuals. The project comprises two distinct lines of evidence, both embracing European and overseas countries: 1) A multicentre, clinical randomized intervention trial with a total of 2,500 pre-diabetic participants, including children and adolescents, adults and elderly. The duration will be 3 years for the adults and elderly, and 2 years for the children and adolescents. 2) Large population studies using data from all age groups. Focus in both lines of evidence will be on diet (specifically protein and glycemic index) and intensity of physical activity, as well as their interaction with the lifestyle factors, habitual stress and sleeping pattern as well as behavioural, environmental, cultural, and socioeconomic variables. PREVIEW will significantly increase our knowledge on how specific lifestyle factors can help preventing type-2 diabetes. Type-2 diabetes accounts for about 90% of all cases of diabetes, primarily caused by the worldwide obesity epidemic. Diabetes is a costly disease and according to WHO, the direct health care costs of diabetes range from 2.5% to 15% of annual national health care budgets. This worrying trend calls for action and a need for a variety of innovative approaches. PREVIEW aims to be such an innovative attempt including all necessary disciplines and stakeholders, who can contribute to developing new ways for the prevention of this wide-spread life-style related disease. The strategic impact of PREVIEW concerns the massive problems associated with the global diabesity epidemic (obesity and type-2 diabetes) and therefore includes partners from Europe (East, West, North and South) and Australia, New Zealand, and Canada. PREVIEW will thereby contribute to improving health over the life-span of the population in Europe as well as worldwide. Overall the public health and socio-economic impact of PREVIEW is expected to be very significant.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2010-1.1.19 | Award Amount: 9.36M | Year: 2011

Environmental change and particularly amplified global climate change are accelerating in the Arctic. These changes already affect local residents and feedback from the Arctics land surface to the climate system, will have global implications. However, climate change and its impacts are variable throughout the wide environmental and land use envelopes of the Arctic. Unfortunately, the Arctic is generally remote, sparsely populated and research and monitoring activities are more restricted in time and space than elsewhere. This limitation comes when there is a rapidly expanding need for knowledge as well as increasing technological opportunities to make data collection in the field and accessibility more efficient. INTERACT is a network under the auspices of SCANNET, a circumarctic network of terrestrial field bases. INTERACT specifically seeks to build capacity for research and monitoring in the European Arctic and beyond. Partnerships will be established between Station Managers and researchers within Joint Research Activities that will develop more efficient networks of sensors to measure changing environmental conditions and make data storage and accessibility more efficient through a single portal. New communities of researchers will be offered access to Arctic terrestrial infrastructures while local stakeholders as well as major international organisations will be involved in interactions with the infrastructures. This will lead to increased public awareness of environmental change and methods to adapt to them, increased access to information for education at all levels, and input to major international research and assessment programmes.The whole consortium will form a coherent and integrated unit working within a concept of a wide environmental and land use envelopes in which local conditions determine the directions and magnitudes of environmental change whereas the balance and synergies of processes integrated across the whole region have global impacts.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: ENV.2009.2.1.3.1;ENV.2009.1.1.3.1 | Award Amount: 8.93M | Year: 2010

The GHG-Europe project aims to improve our understanding and capacity for predicting the European terrestrial carbon and greenhouse gas (GHG) budget by applying a systematic, comprehensive and integrative approach. GHG-Europe quantifies the annual to decadal variability of the carbon and GHG budgets of terrestrial ecosystems in EU27 plus Switzerland and in six data-rich European regions via data-model integration, diagnostic and predictive modelling. Models are calibrated by multi-site observations. Research includes CO2, CH4 and N2O in forests, croplands, grasslands, shrublands, peatlands and soils. Via an integrated approach, GHG Europe scales up consistently from local to regional and continental scale via scale dependent error propagation and systematic quantification of uncertainties, model validation at different scales and top-down verification by atmospheric inversion models. At regional and European scale lateral C transport by land use, trade and rivers are included. Variability in C and GHG budgets is attributed to natural (climate) and anthropogenic drivers (N deposition, land use, past and present management) by synthesis of past and emerging experiments, targeted observations in hot spots and hot moments and model sensitivity analyses. For this purpose, observations are extended to under-sampled regions and ecosystems with likely high importance for the European C budget: forests and land use change in Eastern Europe and Mediterranen shrublands. The future vulnerability of carbon pools and risks of positive feedbacks in the climate-carbon system are assessed by scenario analyses with biophysical models and by integrating feedbacks with socio-economic changes and EU climate and land use policies. GHG-Europe uses a bidirectional interaction with stakeholders to provide regular and timely scientific advice targeted to the emerging needs of the UNFCCC process and for implementing post-2012 climate commitments in Europe.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ISIB-04a-2014 | Award Amount: 5.00M | Year: 2015

Europes bioeconomy is expected to foster economic growth and to tackle significant societal challenges with less harmful environmental effects through innovative, sustainable and inclusive use of European forest resources. Increasing demand for biomass and other ecosystem goods and services calls for changes in forest-related policies at different levels and across different sectors. Accordingly, the recent Forest Strategy provides clear signals towards the need for harmonised information for mapping and assessing the dynamic state of forest ecosystems and their services. Building upon scientific advances in COST E4, 39, 43, USEWOOD, FORSYS, ORCHESTRA; the networks ENFIN, EFFIS, SOSIN; the FP7 EUFODOS, S2BIOM, INTEGRAL, SIMWOOD, FIRE PARADOX the project DIABOLO aims to: i) strengthen the methodological framework towards more accurate, harmonised and timely forest information, e.g. on growing stock and stock changes, biomass, carbon, NWFP; enable the analysis of sustainable biomass supply derived from multipurpose and multisource national forest inventories; and facilitate near real-time forest disturbance monitoring, e.g. on forest fires, storm, drought, insect outbreaks; ii) support EU policy processes, international reporting obligations, forest administration and forest planning entities with new methodologies and EU-wide consistent forest information; iii) make innovative use of existing field-collected data and EC space-based applications of EO and satellite positioning systems with reference to INSPIRE and GEOSS, and global monitoring systems such as REDD\, FLEGT and UNFF. To deliver high impact, beyond state-of-the-art work within the ecological and socio-economic diversity in Europe, the trans-disciplinary DIABOLO involves experts in quantitative modelling, policy science and NFIs, from 26 European countries, committed to provide new methodologies and information for various end-uses, including EFDAC (FISE) at JRC, GLOBIOM at IIASA and work at FAO/UNECE.


Mankind is continually screening low-molecular-weight compounds from a plethora of synthetic and natural sources in the search for molecules with novel or superior pharmaceutical, agrochemical or other biological activities. In this regard, plants are a potentially rich source of bioactive molecules. Because of their extreme diversity and complex chemistry, however, plant metabolism is still underexplored. Consequently, the full potential of plant-derived, low-molecular weight, bioactive compounds is still largely untapped. The TriForC consortium will tackle this issue by establishing an integrative and innovative pipeline for the exploitation of plant triterpenes, one of the largest classes of plant bioactive compounds with an astonishing array of structural diversity and spectrum of biological activities. The TriForC partners each bring to the consortium the necessary tools, resources, methods and production systems required to assemble the pipeline and produce high value plant bioactives for commercialisation for use as e.g. new drugs or agrochemicals. The TriForC consortia will identify new bioactive triterpenes from natural resources by exploring biodiversity. To increase diversity and bioactivity, new-to-nature triterpenes will be derived by semi-synthesis and by an elaborate metabolic engineering platform in plant and microalgal bioreactor-based production systems. To unleash the potential of triterpenes for green biotechnology, structure-activity relationships for triterpenoids will be explored via high throughput screenings for novel chemical entities with potential agrochemical and pharmacological applications. TriForC will further develop and upscale plant-based bioreactors for sustainable commercial production and bio-refining of high-value triterpenes. The TriForC project will guarantee a sustainable and industrially exploitable supply of high value plant compounds with new or superior biological activities ready for commercialisation.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: SiS-2010-2.2.1.1 | Award Amount: 3.84M | Year: 2010

The PROFILES project promotes IBSE through raising the self-efficacy of science teachers and in so doing aiding a better understanding of the changing purpose of teaching science in schools and the value of stakeholder networking. The proposal innovation is in utilizing science teaching materials to support teachers, through an inspired, longitudinal training programme reflecting stakeholder views and needs, while simultaneously promoting a reflective IBSE school-based, training related, intervention to promote learning through creative, scientific problem solving and/or socio-scientific decision making procedures. The measures of success are through a) determining the self efficacy of science teachers in teaching innovative science education approaches allowing student acquisition of life skill competencies and b) in the attitudes of students toward this more context-led, student centered, IBSE-emphasised learning. Dissemination of approaches, reactions, and reflections form a further key project target. Initially PROFILES involves the development of science teachers on four fronts (teacher as learner, as teacher, as reflective practitioner and as leader) consolidating their ownership of the context-led approach and incorporating use-inspired research, evaluative methods and stakeholder networking. The project enhances its dissemination approaches with lead teachers spearheading training of further teachers at pre- and in-service levels and initiating workshops for key stakeholders nationwide. The project focuses on the secondary level so that open inquiry approaches are a major teaching target. PROFILE pays much attention to student motivation for the learning of science both in terms of intrinsic motivation (relevance, meaningful, as considered by the students) and extrinsic motivation (teacher encouragement and reinforcement) and attempts to make school science teaching more meaningful by paying attention to cultural differences, esp. at the gender level


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SFS-10a-2014 | Award Amount: 8.10M | Year: 2015

European aquaculture production provides direct employment to 80,000 people and a 3-billion annual turnover. Parasites cause severe disease outbreaks and high economic losses in finfish aquaculture. The overarching goal of ParaFishControl is to increase the sustainability and competitiveness of European Aquaculture by improving understanding of fish-parasite interactions and by developing innovative solutions and tools for the prevention, control and mitigation of the major parasites affecting Atlantic salmon, rainbow trout, common carp, European sea bass, gilthead sea bream and turbot. To achieve these objectives, ParaFishControl brings together a multidisciplinary consortium comprising 30 partners possessing world-leading, complementary, cross-cutting expertise and drawn from public and private research organisations, and the aquaculture industry. The consortium has access to excellent research facilities, diverse biological resources including host-parasite models, and state-of-the-art vaccinology, genomic, proteomic and transcriptomic technologies. The project will: 1) generate new scientific knowledge on key fish parasites, including genomics, life-cycle, invasion strategy and host-parasite interaction data, with special emphasis on host immunity, pathogen virulence and immunomodulation, providing a scientific basis for improved prophylaxis; 2) determine the transfer of parasites between farmed and wild host populations; 3) develop a wide range of novel prophylactic measures, including vaccines and functional feeds; 4) provide a range of advanced or alternative treatments for parasitic diseases; 5) develop cost-effective, specific and sensitive diagnostic tools for key parasitic diseases; 6) assess the risk factors involved in the emergence, transmission and pathogenesis of parasitic diseases; 7) map the zoonotic risks due to fish helminths and; 8) provide a catalogue of good husbandry practices to obtain safe and high-quality fish products.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: SSH.2012.5.1-1 | Award Amount: 8.43M | Year: 2013

The European Court of Justice expects European citizenship to become the fundamental status of nationals of the Member States. It lies at the heart of the European integration process. The treaties, legislation, and case law have given Europeans an increasing number of rights. Yet the European Commission complains that these remain underused. Therefore, it has included in FP7 a call for a large-scale IP, identifying and analyzing barriers to exercising such European citizenship rights. Utrecht University is initiating a response to this call. In its project proposal it identifies research questions and several categories of potential hindrances as answers to some of them: contradictions between different rights, multilevel rights, and differences in priorities Member States accord these rights; differences in political, administrative, and legal institutions; financial restraints; lack of sufficient solidarity; administrative and bureaucratic hurdles; language problems; and other practical barriers to claiming and exercising rights - and related duties. Furthermore we distinguish citizenship rights by the types of rights - economic, social, political, and civil - and by the ascribed characteristics of the subjects of these rights: male and female, young and old, native and immigrant. We believe multidisciplinarity will help in identifying and analyzing barriers to the exercise of European citizenship. We can learn from other times and places; therefore we add a historical and comparative dimension to the analysis. And we aim to combine insights from the historical, legal, and social sciences. Overall we want to investigate the options for a multilayered citizenship true to the EUs motto In Varietate Concordia. The research questions and theoretically identified barriers will be investigated in 12 different work packages, each containing specific research objectives, tasks, roles of the participants, and deliverables


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: MG-4.2-2014 | Award Amount: 11.46M | Year: 2015

The trend in navigational accidents no longer appears to decrease. In a Formal Safety Assessment (IMO NAV59-6, Annex 1) 5.544 navigational and 7.275 other accidents resulted in the loss of 6.264 lives (2001-2010). The coincide of EU policies on safer and more efficient waterborne operations and in particular the e-maritime initiative with IMOs strategy for e-navigation opens a unique window of opportunity to influence the maritime sector and make substantial impact. Funding of EfficienSea 2 will enable the consortium to exploit this window of opportunity, supporting EU policies and marine traffic management through services to: 1. Improve navigational safety and efficiency 2. Improve Arctic navigation and emergency response 3. Decrease administrative burdens 4. Improve environmental monitoring & enforcement Lasting impact will be ensured by five enabling actions: 1. Development of the Maritime Cloud a communication framework for both e-maritime and e-navigation - enabling efficient sharing of information between all maritime stakeholders 2. Maturing emerging communication technologies, improving ships connectivity 3. Proactive facilitation of standardisation to maximize adoption and impact 4. Showcasing solutions in two very different geographic areas. Web-based initial implementation of the services will be done in the Arctic and the Baltic 5. Ensure an ambitious upgrade of international maritime safety regimes through a strong participation in regulatory bodies including EU and IMO EfficienSea 2 has gathered a unique level of competence in a consortium of 32 partners from 10 countries representing authorities, academia, international organisations as well as equipment manufacturers combining all the right capacities for effectively achieving these ambitious objectives.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: NoE | Phase: HEALTH-2009-2.3.2-1 | Award Amount: 16.97M | Year: 2009

This is a proposal from 55 partners from 36 institutes to form a NoE that will seek to integrate European malaria research that is directed towards a better understanding of the basic biology of the parasite, its vector and of the biology of the interactions between the parasite and both its mammalian host and vectors. All the member institutes and researchers have demonstrated both their excellence and their ability to contribute to a successful network. The structure of the proposed network significantly evolves prior concepts of network structure introducing new modes of research that have recently emerged. Comprising of 4 research clusters the core activities will include molecular cell biology of the parasite, host immunity, vector biology, population biology and systems biology. One arm of the network activities will be concerned with the timely and effective translation of research respecting the IP rights of partner institutes. The network will also contribute significantly to the production of the next generation of malaria researchers through the operation of an expanded European PhD School for malaria research based at EMBL, students enjoying two supervisors based in different member states. Bespoke training courses for PhD students and network personnel will be offered throughout the duration of the network to maximise individual potential. To create a long term benefit from network activities a limited programme of post-doctoral fellowships within the network will be established. Furthermore, individual career mentoring facilities and an alumni association will continue to guide and engage network graduates. New members will be affiliated annually on a competitive basis with an emphasis on young, emerging Principle Investigators. Through the establishment of an umbrella Foundation and active lobbying of government and non-government funding agencies as well as the establishment of a charitable profile the network will strive to become self-determining.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-SICA | Phase: KBBE-2008-3-2-01 | Award Amount: 5.19M | Year: 2009

IRENE project aims at overcoming existing bottlenecks for a broader diffusion of biocatalysis and at accelerating the sustainable innovation of chemical industry by developing computational methods and strategies that will enable to rationally design and produce the next generation of biocatalysts for industrial applications. The consortium is funded on the combination of robust multidisciplinary expertise from EU, Russia and Uzbekistan. Due to the interaction between theoretical groups and experimentalists all computational tools used in this project will be validated by experiments. Failures and successes will be used for methods evaluation and tuning, in an iterative process that will lead to new methods but also to the definition of practical guidelines, for any specific enzyme design issue. The convergence of different expertise will face 4 main tasks: 1) fast rational design of efficient biocatalysts; 2) fast and efficient in silico screening of available enzymes/mutants to exploit catalytic potential of existing biocatalyst and providing quantitative parameters describing enzymes efficiency; 3) fast substrate-screening and rational substrate engineering; 4) understanding molecular basis of biocatalyst action and properties. IRENE will pursue these objectives by taking advantage of computational strategies used in different disciplines and integrate them in an unified concept for studying enzyme catalysis. The four main families of computational methods, Quantum Mechanics, Molecular Mechanics, Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships and Bioinformatics, will used in an integrated approach. The project will have three major design subjects: 1) introduction of new activities in specific enzyme scaffolds (reaction promiscuity); 2) improvement of catalytic activity towards specific targets (substrate promiscuity); 3) the redesign of enantioselectivity. For each subject the work will focus on different specific enzymatic activities of industrial relevance.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 3.31M | Year: 2012

Aim of the CAFFEIN network is to provide 10 early stage researchers (ESRs) and 2 exprerienced researchers (ERs) with excellent training in an industry relevant area of cancer research, complementary skills required for pharmaceutical industry, and knowledge in setting up biomedical start-up companies. To this end, the network comprises two full industrial partners: the established pharmaceutical company Medimmune, a global leader in immunopharmaceuticals, and the small biotech company Gimmune, which used breakthrough results in nanotechnology to establish a new enterprise. The research focus of CAFFEIN, which stands for Cancer Associated Fibroblasts (CAF) Function in Tumor Expansion and Invasion, is to understand the mechanisms, how fibroblastoid cells support tumor progression and metastasis formation. CAF biology is therefore rather complex, but the research groups of the CAFFEIN network cover many different aspects of it, thus having a critical mass to provide relevant training in this area. Training in complementary skills important for work in the pharmaceutical industry is provided by the industrial partner MedImmune, where communication with management, industrial project planning, IPR, etc. will be taught. Entrepreneurial skills, business plans, funding by venture capitalists, and patentability of research findings are highlights of the training provided by the industrial partner Gimmune. All this training is transmitted to the ESRs/ERs by networkwide events, secondments and tight research collaboration. Taken together, the CAFFEIN research training network combines the acquisition of excellent scientific knowledge in an area highly attractive for pharmaceutical industry with special education in relevant complementary skills that increase employment chances of the trained researchers in industry and that encourage them to translate their scientific results into products, thus improving health and economic welfare of European citizens.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: BIOTEC-1-2014 | Award Amount: 8.06M | Year: 2015

Mycoplasmas are the smallest cell wall less, free-living microorganisms. The lack of a cell wall makes them resistant to many of the common antibiotics. Every year, infections caused by Mycoplasmas in poultry, cows, and pigs, result in multimillion euros losses in USA and Europe. Currently, there are vaccines against M hyopneumoniae in pigs and M gallisepticum and M synoviae in poultry. However, there is no vaccination against many Mycoplasma species infecting pets, humans and farm animals (ie M bovis cow infection). Mycoplasma species in many cases are difficult to grown in axenic culture and those that grow need a complex media with animal serum. In large scale production of Mycoplasma species for vaccination aside from the high cost of animal serum, more important is the high irreproducibility in the production process and the possible contamination with animal viruses. All this together highlights what European industry needs:i) a defined cheap reproducible medium that is animal serum free and ii) an universal Mycoplasma chassis that could be used in a pipeline to vaccinate against Mycoplasma species, as well as any pathogen. M pneumoniae is an ideal starting point for designing such a vaccine chassis. It has a small genome (860 kb) and it is probably the organism with the most comprehensive systems biology data acquired so far. By genome comparison, metabolic modeling and rationally engineering its genome, we will create a vaccine chassis that will be introduced into an industrial pipeline. The process will be guided by the second world largest industry on animal vaccination (MSD), as well as a SME specialized on peptide display and screening. This will ensure the exploitation and commercialization of our work contributing to maintain Europe privileged position in this field. Our ultimate goal is to meet the needs of the livestock industry,taking care of ethical issues, foreseeable risks, and prepare effective dissemination and training material for the public.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH-2009-3.3.1. | Award Amount: 1.72M | Year: 2010

Tolerance has been increasingly invoked as the inspiring ideal of a number of social policies in European democracies. Appeals to tolerance have animated especially the political debates on those policies addressed to accommodate minorities requests. Among such requests those for the allocation of public spaces have recently acquired pride of place in the political agendas of many European and extra-European countries (e.g. the allocation of space for Roma sites; Muslims requests to build places of worship and housing policies for migrants). Despite such a generalized political and societal relevance of the notion of tolerance, some problems may occur when policies inspired by it are implemented. In particular, the implementation of tolerance-inspired spatial policies may result in the marginalisation of differences and thus risk undermining social cohesion. What conception of tolerance may be invoked to limit such a risk? To answer this question, we shall test the hypothesis that grounding tolerance on equal respect for persons may contribute to the development of spatial policies capable of resolving the tensions between tolerance and social cohesion in culturally diverse societies. In particular, the project pursues 4 objectives:1.to develop a conceptual taxonomy to clarify the liaisons between tolerance, respect and spatial issues;2.to study the ways in which appeals to tolerance have informed the development of spatial policies;3.to investigate the influence of cultural diversities on the interpretations of tolerance in different national contexts;4.to extrapolate from the above studies an overall view of the connections between tolerance and equal respect. Our findings will be of interests to national and international Civil Society Organisations (CSOs), policy makers at a European, national, regional and municipal level and international academics engaged in the study of urban integration in different social, religious, cultural, and political contexts.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SFS-15-2014 | Award Amount: 8.82M | Year: 2015

PROTEIN2FOODs aim is to develop innovative, cost-effective and resource-efficient plant proteins rich food sources with positive impact on human health, the environment and biodiversity. The quality and quantity of protein from selected highly nutritious seed crops (quinoa, amaranth and buckwheat), and legumes with high protein quantity (lupin, faba beans, pea, chickpea, lentil) will be significantly enhanced by using a multi-disciplinary approach that will include genetic, agronomic, food process engineering, sensory, socio-economic, and environmental assessment. Research is expected to improve the quality of plant proteins, produced in Europe, and of the sustainability of their production and processing. Through a better understanding of the: i) genetic mechanisms driving the protein formation and accumulation in the seed, ii) plant performance towards biotic and abiotic stresses, and iii) protein interactions with other components in the food matrix and its sensory repercussions in the final food products, this research should lead to the development of adapted plant protein sources with positive impact on environment and biodiversity as well as human health. Expected results in the project are: i) enhance the protein production by 25% through new effective breeding techniques and optimised crop management with an increase by 10% of the EUs arable land destined to protein-crop production, using also marginal soils, ii) accelerate protein transition from animal-based protein to plant based protein in Europe with clear impact on reduction of carbon footprint, iii) increase EU agro-biodiversity by introducing promising high quality crops and legumes. Further, activities will support the prototypes of new protein-rich-protein food with exceptional market potential. Finally, we will improve the EUs visibility in the area of food processing and technology through high impact factors scientific publications.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: ENV.2008.2.1.6.1. | Award Amount: 9.07M | Year: 2009

The project MOdels for AdapTIVE forest Management (MOTIVE) will evaluate the consequences of the intensified competition for forest resources given climate and land use change. The project focuses on a wide range of European forest types under different intensities of forest management. In particular, MOTIVE examines impacts with respect to the disturbance regimes determining forest dynamics. MOTIVE seeks to develop and evaluate strategies that can adapt forest management practices to balance multiple objectives under changing environmental conditions. The evaluation of different adaptive management systems will take place within a scenario analysis and a regional landscape framework. A wide range of possible scenarios will be taken into account on different time scales. The main forest types in Europe for the most important bioclimatic regions will be covered and the most important goods and services delivered by Eurpean forests will be assessed using the most up to date models. The ultimate objective of the MOTIVE project is to provide insights, data and tools to improve policymaking and adaptive forest resource management in the face of rapidly changing climatic and land-use conditions. In order to reach its objectives, MOTIVE is organized into six scientific work packages in addition to a management-oriented work package : Baseline trends and possible futures for the EU. Development of improved models for Adaptive Forest Management. Testing and evaluating management options and risks. Evaluating and selecting good adaptive forest management strategies. Improved decision support in adaptive forest management. Stakeholder/Decision maker interaction and Dissemination. One of the main deliverables of MOTIVE will be an Adaptive Forest Management toolbox. The toolbox will provide up-to-date methods for planning and decision making in AFM to the decision maker (forest resource manager, policy maker) for actual use in strategic and tactical forest management planning


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: BG-03-2014 | Award Amount: 7.65M | Year: 2015

Microalgae are a source of secondary metabolites useful as new bioactive compounds. Activity of these compounds against bacterial pathogens and biofilm formation has not been determined yet. Biofilm formation is especially important in infections and tissue inflammation related to implants and catheters. These problems finally cause a release of the implant, which must be removed and replaced by a new one, entailing an increase in antibiotic consumption, together with a health costs of about 50,000-90,000 per infection episode. Taking both problems in account, the search of new antimicrobial agents that will be effective against the bacteria in their two ways of life, planktonic and biofilm stage, is a priority need in the clinical practice. For this reason, the overall objective of NOMORFILM project is to search for antibiofilm compounds isolated from microalgae that will be useful in the treatment of this kind of infections and could be incorporated in the manufacturing of medical prosthetic devices. For this purpose, 4,000 microalgae species will be deeply screened specifically for new antibacterial and antibiofilm molecules. Structural elucidation of bioactive compounds from these extracts will assure that only new chemical entities, therefore with anticipated new mechanisms of action, will arise to further project stages, those including toxicity tests and animal models. This project also addresses the biosynthesis of the targeted bioactive compounds in sustainable microalgae co-cultures, diminishing cultivation costs by mimicking natural aquatic ecosystems. Most industrially interesting antibiofilm molecules will be incorporated into nanoparticles in order to develop manufacturing methodologies able to incorporate these compounds into real prosthetic devices matrixes. Marketing of results are assured by the presence of diverse SMEs along the manufacture and distribution of prosthetic devices, and the corresponding consortium agreements with respect to IPRs


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2011-2.3.1. | Award Amount: 8.30M | Year: 2012

DASISH provides solutions to a number of common issues relevant for the five ESFRI projects in social science and humanities, being CESSDA, CLARIN, DARIAH, ESS and SHARE and therefore is supporting infrastructure construction. These five infrastructures are presently at different stages in the process of establishing ERICs. DASISH has identified four major areas namely data quality, data archiving, data access and legal and ethics. The activities in these four major areas are based on a thorough analysis of the underlying architectures. The outcome forms the basis for educational activities and for outreach to the communities that are to benefit from the work. Through DASISH the participating infrastructures will not only obtain new solutions for specific problems and a consolidation of their infrastructure building, but will work out solutions facilitating interdisciplinary cross-walks of their researchers. This will be of mutual benefit for the five infrastructures and the communities they serve.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: ENV.2008.1.1.1.1. | Award Amount: 13.64M | Year: 2009

The melting of continental ice (glaciers, ice caps and ice sheets) is a substantial source of current sea-level rise, and one that is accelerating more rapidly than was predicted even a few years ago. Indeed, the most recent report from Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change highlighted that the uncertainty in projections of future sea-level rise is dominated by uncertainty concerning continental ice, and that understanding of the key processes that will lead to loss of continental ice must be improved before reliable projections of sea-level rise can be produced. The ice2sea programme will draw together European and international partners, to reduce these uncertainties. We will undertake targeted studies of key processes in mountain glacier systems and ice caps (e.g. Svalbard), and in ice sheets in both polar regions (Greenland and Antarctica) to improve understanding of how these systems will respond to future climate change. We will improve satellite determinations of continental ice mass, and provide much-needed datasets for testing glacier-response models. Using newly developed ice-sheet/glacier models, we will generate detailed projections of the contribution of continental ice to sea-level rise over the next 200 years, and identify thresholds that commit the planet to long-term sea-level rise. We will deliver these results in forms accessible to scientists, policy-makers and the general public, which will include clear presentations of the sources of uncertainty. The ice2sea programme will directly inform the ongoing international debate on climate-change mitigation, and European debates surrounding coastal adaptation and sea-defence planning. It will leave a legacy of improved understanding of key cryospheric processes affecting development of the Earth System and the predictive tools for glacier-response modelling, and it will train a new generation of young European researchers who can use those tools for the future benefit of society.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.9.9 | Award Amount: 11.78M | Year: 2013

The overarching goal of our project is to develop systems based on direct and deterministic interactions between individual quantum entities, which by involving large-scale entanglement can outperform classical systems in a series of relevant applications.\nWe plan to achieve that by improving technologies from atomic, molecular and optical physics as well as from solid-state physics, and by developing new ones, including combinations across those different domains. We will explore a wide range of experimental platforms as enabling technologies: from cold collisions or Rydberg blockade in neutral atoms to electrostatic or spin interactions in charged systems like trapped ions and quantum dots; from photon-phonon interactions in nano-mechanics to photon-photon interactions in cavity quantum electrodynamics and to spin-photon interactions in diamond color centers.\nWe will work on two deeply interconnected lines to build experimentally working implementations of quantum simulators and of quantum interfaces. This will enable us to conceive and realize applications exploiting those devices for simulating important problems in other fields of physics, as well as for carrying out protocols outperforming classical communication and measurement systems.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2008-1.1.1 | Award Amount: 12.34M | Year: 2009

The Integrated Infrastructure Initiative for Neutron Scattering and Muon Spectroscopy (NMI3) aims at the pan-European coordination of neutron scattering and muon spectroscopy, maintaining these research infrastructures as an integral part of the European Research Area. NMI3 comprehensively includes all major facilities in the field, opening the way for a more concerted, and thus more efficient, use of the existing infrastructure. Co-ordination and networking within NMI3 will lead to a more strategic approach to future developments and thus reinforce European competitiveness in this area. NMI3 is a consortium of 22 partners from 13 countries, including 10 research infrastructures. The objective of integration will be achieved by using several tools: * Transnational ACCESS will be provided by 10 partners offering more than 4000 days of beam time. This will give European users access to all of the relevant European research infrastructures and hence the possibility to use the best adapted infrastructure for their research. * Joint Research Activities focusing on six specific R&D areas will develop techniques and methods for next generation instrumentation. They involve basically all those European facilities and academic institutions with major parts of the relevant know-how. * Dissemination and training actions will help to enhance and to structure future generations of users. * Networking and common management will help strategic decision-making from a truly European perspective.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH.2010.2.1.2-1 | Award Amount: 16.16M | Year: 2010

Cancer is hallmarked by multiple genetic aberrations that lead to a functional derangement of cellular signalling networks. Embryonal tumours (ETs) comprising neuroblastoma, medulloblastoma and Ewing sarcoma, occur early in life, and thus may reveal pathogenetically relevant lesions clearer than adulthood tumours which carry passenger mutations accumulated during life. ASSET will exploit this fact by focussing on unravelling the signalling networks and their alterations in ETs. The basic hypothesis is that ETs share common pathogenetic principles that can be captured and made accessible to rational analysis by combining high-throughput and high content analysis of the genome, transcriptome and proteome with mathematical modelling. ASSET builds on a previous FP6 consortium, the European Embryonal Tumour Pipeline (EEPT), which generated high-throughput genomic and transcriptomic data on ETs. ASSET is the next logical step to add crucial functional information that will allow us to generate (i) defined in vitro and in vivo tumour systems; (ii) combined analysis of genomic mutations, transcriptome, miRNA expression and dynamic proteome changes; (iii) systematic perturbations; (iv) mathematical modelling to elucidate pathogenetic networks and their emergent behaviour; (v) the virtuous cycle of model validation in relevant biological model systems and clinical samples towards a major goal. This goal is to identify mechanistically understood network vulnerabilities that can be exploited for new approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of major paediatric tumours. Elucidating such core mechanisms will (i) improve understanding of and therapeutic options for these devastating childhood malignancies and (ii) enable a rational approach to deal with the complexity of the pathogenesis of adulthood cancers.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE.2013.2.2-02 | Award Amount: 13.01M | Year: 2013

Emerging evidence indicates that the gut microbiome contributes to our ability to extract energy from the diet and influences development and function of the immune, endocrine and nervous systems, which regulate energy balance and behaviour. This has led to hypothesize that developing microbiome-based dietary interventions can be cost-effective measures to prevent diet-related and behavioural disorders. Yet this approach is restricted in practice by a lack of understanding of the specific species that contribute to these disorders and their interactions with host and lifestyle determinants. To progress beyond the state of the art, the MyNewGut proposal aims to: (1) shed light on the contribution of the human microbiome to nutrient metabolism and energy expenditure; (2) identify microbiome-related features that contribute to or predict obesity and associated disorders in human epidemiological studies; (3) understand how the microbiome is influenced by environmental factors and its role in brain and immune development and function in humans; and (4) provide proof-of-concept of the disease risk-reduction potential of dietary intervention with new foods/ingredients targeting the gut microbiome in humans. To this end, a translational multidisciplinary research strategy will be developed, combining experts in omic-technologies and all other scientific disciplines required. Consequently, the MyNewGut proposal will contribute to developing new approaches to prevent diet-related diseases (metabolic syndrome and obesity) and behavioural disorders through lifestyle changes, intake of pro- and prebiotics and semi-personalised and innovative food products. This will ultimately contribute to increasing the competitiveness of the European food industry and provide consumers with reliable claims on foods. Results will also help inform new strategies on public health, support EU legislation and improve the position of the EU in the field of food-related disease prevention.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: ENV.2009.1.2.3.1 | Award Amount: 5.07M | Year: 2009

This proposal has been elaborated by a consortium of 35 partners coming from 27 European countries and including scientists, government institutions and authorities, NGOs and industry. The main goal is to develop a coherent approach to HBM in Europe as requested by ACTION 3 of the EU Environment and Health Action Plan through coordination of ongoing and planned HBM activities. The project will exploit existing and planned HBM projects and programmes of work and capabilities in Europe. The consortium will investigate what is needed to advance and improve comparability of HBM data across Europe. Work prepared under DG Research and DG Environment activities dealing with development, validation and use of novel biomarkers including non-invasive markers and effect markers will be exploited. Through close collaboration with similar initiatives in the field of Health - such as the EU Health Examination Survey - appropriate economies and efficiencies will be assessed. Key issues such as Ethics and human Biobanks will be addressed. The project will deliver a number of key outputs including: 1. Tested Proofs of Concept and/or Demonstration project assessing the feasibility of a coordinated approach, including strategies for data interpretation & integration with environmental and health data. 2. A rationale and strategy for communication and dissemination of information, results and key messages to all stakeholders from the public to policy makers 3. Training and capacity building will aim to promote knowledge and experience exchange and development in the field of HBM within Europe A common understanding within all parties involved on the potential of HMB in supporting and evaluating current/future policy making (including e.g. REACH) and for environmental health awareness raising will be promoted This project aim is to significantly advance the process towards a fully operational, continuous, sustainable and scientifically sound EU HBM programme.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 4.10M | Year: 2015

Cement production for the construction industry contributes up to 5% of anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Developing more environmentally friendly concrete requires the assessment of strength for a diverse range of new cement materials. Similar issues arise during the development of biocompatible cements for medical applications. Properties of naturally cemented materials of organic origin are of key importance in the oil industry, with carbonate reservoirs prone to creep, particularly during the injection of CO2 for enhanced oil recovery or permanent storage. However, despite the importance of cement materials to our infrastructure, health and environment, we still lack the fundamental basis for understanding the strength of cemented aggregates. Granular pastes and sediments transform to strong solids through reactions at nano-confined mineral interfaces, where nucleation and growth at the adjacent solid surfaces are affected in a manner not yet understood. There is a need for improved concepts, theories and models. NanoHeal targets this issue by bringing six industrial and six academic groups together in a European Training Network (ETN), in an emerging interdisciplinary field spanning from basic sciences to the corresponding engineering disciplines. NanoHeal will deliver an outstanding environment for training and career development of young researchers. The aims of NanoHeal are to: develop innovative probes and models for nanoscale processes that open novel perspectives in design and control of organo-mineral materials. measure and improve the strength and durability of 1) new man-made cemented materials like green concrete, speciality cements in construction and oil and gas recovery, and biocompatible implants and 2) natural sedimentary rocks inside reservoirs and as construction materials educate young interdisciplinary researchers at the interface between fundamental science and European industry.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 3.56M | Year: 2015

The aim is to create an innovative European PhD training network in bone pain. Millions in Europe and beyond suffer from bone pain, a debilitating complication of many musculoskeletal disorders such as arthritis and bone metastasis. However, being a truly multidisciplinary subject spanning neuroscience, bone biology, and even cancer research, it demands a multidisciplinary approach. Despite a huge negative impact on the quality of life of the patients and on society as a whole, no specific treatment is available. To address this societal challenge and the strong innovation potential, we want to form the first European platform to promote frontline research, innovation and education within bone pain. The network encompasses 5 academic and 2 industrial beneficiaries and 1 industrial partner all committed to creating an outstanding wide-ranging yet integrated training program for early stages researchers to elucidate the mechanisms of bone pain and develop new medicines. We will use in vivo models of arthritic pain, cancer-induced bone pain and fracture pain to investigate the pathophysiology and novel treatment strategies. In vivo electrophysiology will be used for studying the physiology and pharmacology of pain transmission and its modulation. Transgenic mouse models will be used to tease out the specific neuronal receptor subtypes involved. Sophisticated behaviour tests will evaluate response to novel treatments. We will create a biobank of human cancer-infiltrated bone to identify specific patterns of neuronal receptor expression and to validate therapeutic targets in humans. In an extensive training effort covering both specific research skills and transferable skills, the students will obtain an interdisciplinary, state-of-the-art and innovative training from the participants, several of which have experience from international networks. The students will benefit from secondments with industrial partners and with some of the foremost pain researchers in Europe


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INT-04-2015 | Award Amount: 3.72M | Year: 2016

This Project aims to address an increasingly pressing global challenge: How to achieve the EUs development goals and the UNs Sustainable Development Goals, while meeting the global target of staying within two degrees global warming and avoid transgressing other planetary boundaries. EU policies must align with sustainable development goals (Article 11 TFEU). The impacts of climate change and global loss of natural habitat undermine the progress achieved by pursuing the Millennium Development Goals and threaten the realisation of EU development policy goals. Our focus is the role of EUs public and private market actors. They have a high level of interaction with actors in emerging and developing economies, and are therefore crucial to achieving the EUs development goals. However, science does not yet cater for insights in how the regulatory environment influences their decision-making, nor in how we can stimulate them to make development-friendly, environmentally and socially sustainable decisions. Comprehensive, ground-breaking research is necessary into the regulatory complexity in which EU private and public market actors operate, in particular concerning their interactions with private and public actors in developing countries. Our Consortium, leading experts in law, economics, and applied environmental and social science, is able to analyse this regulatory complexity in a transdisciplinary and comprehensive perspective, both on an overarching level and in depth, in the form of specific product life-cycles: ready-made garments and mobile phones. We bring significant new evidence-based insights into the factors that enable or hinder coherence in EU development policy; we will advance the understanding of how development concerns can be successfully integrated in non-development policies and regulations concerning market actors; and we provide tools for improved PCD impact assessment as well as for better corporate sustainability assessment.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH-2009-2.1.1-1 | Award Amount: 13.70M | Year: 2010

Genetic studies in model organisms and humans, including human genome-wide association studies, have pinpointed genomic regions that contribute susceptibility to common disease. However, to date, these data have provided limited insights into the genes, molecular pathways and mechanisms underlying disease pathophysiology. The EU FP6 Euratools consortium has been a remarkable success that established significant research collaborations, expertise and infrastructure in the EU, making a major contribution to the rat focus issue of Nature Genetics (Volume 40, May 2008), which featured six papers from the consortium. These successes underpin the current project in which we will use state-of-the-art and emerging large-scale technologies and advanced computation in an expanded multi-disciplinary approach to identify gene networks and genomic mechanisms underlying common diseases. We will use the rat as a model system to identify the major functional pathways underlying human inflammatory, cardiovascular and metabolic, and behavioral disorders. Our consortium brings together world class investigators who will use next-generation sequencing technologies to generate genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic datasets. To this, we will add cutting-edge, quantitative metabonomic and proteomic datasets to give significant depth of coverage, at multiple levels, across pathophysiological phenotypes. These datasets will be gathered, annotated and integrated in relational and dynamic models that will be used in comparative analyses to understand human gene function at the level of the molecule, cell, tissue and organism. These studies will lead to new insights into disease mechanisms, through an integrative, cross-disciplinary approach to understanding large-scale functional genomic datasets in rats and humans.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH-2007-2.3.2-7 | Award Amount: 13.02M | Year: 2009

CHAIN is a large scale integrating project aimed to effectively and durably combat new and existing anti-HIV drug resistance in clinical settings, with a special emphasis on Eastern Europe and in heavily affected resource-poor regions in Africa. This will be achieved through our pan-European network of surveillance and basic research activities, the involvement of all main actors in the field of HIV and anti-HIV drug resistance, monitoring how resistances develop and evolve, improved understanding of mechanisms of resistance development, performing molecular epidemiology studies, providing improved and new strategies to evaluate and limit the emergence and transmission of HIV drug resistance, setting up training and dissemination activities and supporting evidence-based public health policy and action. CHAIN brings together Europes leading internationally recognised scientific expertise in basic science, molecular epidemiology, bioinformatics and surveillance of HIV and HIV resistance including the WHO, strong links to Eastern Europe through the existing FP6 funded cohort network Europe HIVresistance and strategic links to relevant pan-European cohort networks and national cohort networks (PENTA/ECS, CASCADE, EuroSIDA, COHERE, ICoNa, UK-CHIC, SHCS). Our balanced programme of work is informed by optimising the synergistic skills represented by the applicants, and also through harmonising with existing initiatives, that ensures lack of duplication, but rather maximises the impact of European activities. Thus, our African and Eastern European work will be linked to WHO policy, our European surveillance studies will be guided by ECDC (through our advisory board), and our clinical research will generate questions best addressed through the NEAT clinical trial network. Finally, our partnership with the key biotechnology companies in HIV resistance will ensure maximal impact of our basis research activities.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CPCSA | Phase: INFRA-2010-1.2.1 | Award Amount: 70.14M | Year: 2010

Scientific research is no longer conducted within national boundaries and is becoming increasing dependent on the large-scale analysis of data, generated from instruments or computer simulations housed in trans-national facilities, by using e Infrastructure (distributed computing and storage resources linked by high-performance networks).\nThe 48 month EGI-InSPIRE project will continue the transition to a sustainable pan-European e-Infrastructure started in EGEE-III. It will sustain support for Grids of high-performance and high-throughput computing resources, while seeking to integrate new Distributed Computing Infrastructures (DCIs), i.e. Clouds, SuperComputing, Desktop Grids, etc., as they are required by the European user community. It will establish a central coordinating organisation, EGI.eu, and support the staff throughout Europe necessary to integrate and interoperate individual national grid infrastructures. EGI.eu will provide a coordinating hub for European DCIs, working to bring existing technologies into a single integrated persistent production infrastructure for researchers within the European Research Area.\nEGI-InSPIRE will collect requirements and provide user-support for the current and new (e.g. ESFRI) users. Support will also be given for the current heavy users as they move their critical services and tools from a central support model to ones driven by their own individual communities. The project will define, verify and integrate within the Unified Middleware Distribution, the middleware from external providers needed to access the e-Infrastructure. The operational tools will be extended by the project to support a national operational deployment model, include new DCI technologies in the production infrastructure and the associated accounting information to help define EGIs future revenue model.


The proposed integrating project LOWINPUTBREEDS aims to develop integrated LIVESTOCK BREEDING and MANAGEMENT strategies to improve ANIMAL HEALTH, product QUALITY and PERFORMANCE in European organic and low input milk, meat and egg production through research, dissemination and training activities. The consortium includes 11 academic centres of excellence and 6 genetics/breeding companies (4 SMEs) in 11 European, 2 ICPC and 2 industrialised third countries. The proposed project has 4 main Science and Technology OBJECTIVES: 1. To DEVELOP and evaluate INNOVATIVE BREEDING CONCEPTS, including (a) genome wide and (b) marker assisted selection, and (c) cross-, (d) flower- and (e) farmer participatory breeding strategies, which will deliver genotypes with robustness and quality traits required under low input conditions. The project will focus on 5 LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION SYSTEMS (dairy cows, dairy and meat sheep, pigs and laying hens) and design SPECIES-SPECIFIC BREEDING STRATEGIES for different macroclimatic regions in Europe. 2. To INTEGRATE the use of IMPROVED GENOTYPES with INNOVATIVE MANAGEMENT approaches including improved diets, feeding regimes and rearing systems. This will focus on issues (e.g. mastitis and parasite control, animal welfare problems) where breeding or management innovations alone are unlikely to provide satisfactory solutions. 3. To IDENTIFY potential ECONOMIC, ENVIRONMENTAL, GENETIC DIVERSITY and ETHICAL IMPACTS of project deliverables to ensure they conform to different societal priorities and consumer demands/expectations and are acceptable to producers. 4. To ESTABLISH an efficient TRAINING and DISSEMINATION programme aimed at rapid exploitation and application of project deliverables by the organic and low input livestock industry.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENV.2013.6.2-7 | Award Amount: 3.90M | Year: 2013

European cultural landscapes are valued as everyday living environment, countryside, heritage, scenery with aesthetic and recreational qualities and unique biodiversity, and as a source of ecosystem services that they provide to society. Cultural landscapes, however, are undergoing rapid and fundamental transformations across Europe, mainly as a result of an on-going polarization of land use, with abandonment and rural exodus on the one hand, and intensification and (peri-) urbanisation on the other. So far, substantial challenges have inhibited the design of effective responses to safeguard cultural landscape values. The proposed HERCULES project strives for the empowerment of public and private actors to protect, manage, and plan for sustainable landscapes of significant cultural, historical, and archaeological value at local, national, and pan-European scales. By applying and developing innovative technologies and tools for assessing and mapping cultural landscapes, the project will (a) synthesise existing knowledge on drivers, patterns, and outcomes of persistence and change in Europes cultural landscapes; (b) perform targeted case studies to develop in-depth insights on dynamics and values of cultural landscapes; (c) develop a typology of cultural landscapes and scale-up case study insights using observations and landscape modelling; (d) develop visions for re-coupling social and ecological components in cultural landscapes and translate them into policy and management options; and (e) design and implement a community-based Knowledge Hub for Good Landscape Practice and demonstrate it with land users, agencies, SMEs, and citizen associations. HERCULES comprises European universities, SMEs, NGOs, and a research institute that are leaders in landscape science and practice. The project follows the European Landscape Conventions call for transdisciplinary research and involves all actors with stakes in cultural landscapes of historical and archaeological value.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CPCSA | Phase: INFRA-2012-2.3.1. | Award Amount: 26.57M | Year: 2012

PRACE-3IP supports the accelerated implementation of the pan-European HPC Research Infrastructure (RI) created in April 2010. It continues, complements, and extends the work of the PRACE-1IP and -2IP projects.\nPRACE-3IP addresses the computational and simulation needs of European scientific communities and of industry to keep them at the forefront of discovery. Our vision is the formation of an integrated HPC ecosystem of facilities and services enabling researchers to realise the full potential of computational science within the supportive environment of the ERA.\nThe project will undertake a joint pre-commercial procurement (PCP) pilot to obtain a solution for a Whole System Design for Energy Efficient HPC. This pilot is the first of its kind on a Europe-wide level and the lessons learned will be invaluable for PRACE in its future procurement strategy and for Europe as a whole in using PCP as a driver for innovation.\nPRACE-3IP will deliver a broad set of services suitable for use by industry and commerce. The PRACE RI will be open for use by SMEs and large European businesses, offering Tier-0 and Tier-1 access, training, and applications support.\nApplications support and enabling will have a bias towards addressing major socio-economic challenges. New tools will be made available under Open Source. Best practises will be identified, documented and made available to the European HPC community in academia and industry.\nPRACE-3IP will have a broad training and outreach activity designed to engage more user communities, including industry, in the use of HPC. The next generation of students and researchers will be introduced to the benefits of HPC and the technologies and knowledge required applying it successfully in their discipline.\nPRACE-3IP will considerably strengthen and deepen the co-operation between HPC centres, funding bodies and research communities in a mutually beneficial partnership to enhance European scientific and industrial competitiveness.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CPCSA | Phase: INFRA-2010-1.2.1 | Award Amount: 24.95M | Year: 2010

The European Middleware Initiative is a collaboration of the three major middleware providers in Europe, ARC, gLite and UNICORE, and other consortia. EMI aims to deliver a consolidated set of middleware components for deployment in EGI, PRACE and other DCIs; extend the interoperability between grids and other computing infrastructures; strengthen the reliability of the services; and establish a sustainable model to maintain and evolve the middleware, fulfilling the requirements of the user communities.\nEuropean scientific research has benefited recently from the increasing availability of computing and data infrastructures with unprecedented capabilities for large scale distributed initiatives. These infrastructures are largely defined by enabling middleware. After the necessary initial period of research and consolidation that has taken place in the past several years, the growing usage of these resources now requires the transformation of the computing infrastructures into a professionally managed and standardized service. It is of strategic importance for the establishment of permanent, sustainable research infrastructures to lower the technological barriers still preventing resource owners from federating the resources, and potential communities of tens of thousands of researchers from using grids as a commodity tool in their daily activities.\nThe EMI project will make the realization of this vision possible by addressing a number of problems that still prevent users from easily accessing and using the whole capacity of the existing computing infrastructures. It will focus on improving the usability and accessibility for scientific users and the interoperability and manageability for service providers. The sustainability of the grid services will be directly addressed by replacing wherever possible proprietary technology with off-the-shelf components, improving their standardization and implementing industry standard quality assurance methodologies.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: Health | Award Amount: 2.25M | Year: 2015

The European Consortium for Communicating Stem Cell Research (EuroStemCell) unites 33 partner institutions, that collectively represent >400 stem cell research groupings across Europe. Our common goal is to provide trusted high quality information on stem cells accessible to citizens and stakeholders across Europe, through support and further development of the multi-lingual European Stem Cell Information Portal www.eurostemcell.org. To achieve our aims, EuroStemCell will adopt the highly structured system for coordinated information management established by the FP7 Coordination and Support Action (CSA) also called EuroStemCell. From this, we will implement an ambitious programme of online and direct stakeholder engagement with stem cell research and regenerative medicine, aimed at European citizens at all educational levels. This will include provision of resources tailored specifically for decision-making on stem cell-related questions and an extensive programme of dissemination and capacity building in science communications and public engagement. The proposed work centres on an information hub team, which will link to all project partners and to stakeholders in the stem cell and regenerative medicine arenas and wider society, working with these groupings to implement the project. All outputs will be delivered in 6 European languages, to ensure broad accessibility, and will be rigorously evaluated against measurable objectives throughout the project duration. The proposed consortium comprises leading stem cell labs across Europe, including new member states, together with experts in ethical and societal concerns and evaluating clinical outcomes. It thus provides unparalleled European expertise across the fields of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine and is uniquely placed to maintain and further develop www.eurostemcell.org as a world-leading stem cell information resource, thus meeting the challenge outlined in Topic HOA-6-2014.


Jemec G.B.E.,Roskilde Hospital | Jemec G.B.E.,Copenhagen University
New England Journal of Medicine | Year: 2012

A 36-year-old woman has recurrent boils under both arms and in the groin. They flare premenstrually, causing pain, suppuration, and an offensive odor. Scarring has developed in the groin area, and chronically draining sinus tracts are interspersed with normal skin. Treatment with short courses of antibiotics or with incision and drainage has had no apparent effect, and she has become socially isolated because of embarrassment about her condition. How would you manage this case? Copyright © 2012 Massachusetts Medical Society. All rights reserved.


Vinther J.,University of Bristol | Stein M.,Copenhagen University | Longrich N.R.,University of Bath | Harper D.A.T.,Durham University
Nature | Year: 2014

Large, actively swimming suspension feeders evolved several times in Earth's history, arising independently from groups as diverse as sharks, rays and stemteleost fishes1, and in mysticete whales2. However, animals occupying this niche have not been identified fromthe early Palaeozoic era. Anomalocarids, a group of stem arthropods that were the largest nektonic animals of the Cambrian and Ordovician periods, are generally thought to have been apex predators3-5. Here we describe new material from Tamisiocaris borealis6, an anomalocarid fromthe EarlyCambrian (Series 2) Sirius Passet Fauna of North Greenland, and propose that its frontal appendage is specialized for suspension feeding. The appendage bears long, slender and equally spaced ventral spines furnished with dense rows of long and fine auxiliary spines. This suggests that T. borealiswas a microphagous suspension feeder, using its appendages for sweep-net capture of food items down to 0.5mm, within the size range of mesozooplankton such as copepods. Our observations demonstrate that large, nektonic suspension feeders first evolvedduring theCambrian explosion, as part of an adaptive radiation of anomalocarids. The presence of nektonic suspension feeders intheEarlyCambrian, togetherwith evidence for a diverse pelagic community containing phytoplankton7,8 andmesozooplankton7,9,10, indicate the existence of a complex pelagic ecosystem11 supported by high primary productivity and nutrient flux12,13. Cambrian pelagic ecosystems seem to have been more modern than previously believed. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited.


Berchtold M.W.,Copenhagen University | Villalobo A.,Autonomous University of Madrid
Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular Cell Research | Year: 2014

Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous Ca2+ receptor protein mediating a large number of signaling processes in all eukaryotic cells. CaM plays a central role in regulating a myriad of cellular functions via interaction with multiple target proteins. This review focuses on the action of CaM and CaM-dependent signaling systems in the control of vertebrate cell proliferation, programmed cell death and autophagy. The significance of CaM and interconnected CaM-regulated systems for the physiology of cancer cells including tumor stem cells, and processes required for tumor progression such as growth, tumor-associated angiogenesis and metastasis are highlighted. Furthermore, the potential targeting of CaM-dependent signaling processes for therapeutic use is discussed. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN | Award Amount: 3.77M | Year: 2014

The BIopolymer BAsed FOOd Delivery Systems (BIBAFOODS) network will train young researchers for the advancement of food science and technology, by providing them with the complementary skills necessary to develop the future sustainable food industry and entrepreneurial skills crucial for creating biotechnological food oriented start-up companies. This collaborative training network will combine the complementary training capabilities of each individual partner institution to improve the trainees chances for employment and promote health and welfare in the EC by providing the capability to develop novel functional foods. The scientific focus of the research training is on colloidal delivery systems to protect and deliver active components via foods, resulting in novel functional foods. The development of these systems is to be based on only food-grade ingredients and upon economical feasible processes. The hypothesis is that the materials and coatings can be made responsive to the external chemical conditions and therefore suitable for controlled releases targeted at a desired stage during food processing or at a specific point during digestion of the food, e.g. in the intestinal tract. This will involve probiotic bacteria and enzymes that are liberated and allowed to be active in a controllable way. The ultimate successful materials ensure stability of the active component during long term storage prior to food production, during food production or during digestion, but at the same time liberating the active component at the right point. The behaviour and interaction of the delivery systems will be studied by simulation of gastric and intestinal conditions and by implementation in food production and formulation into probiotic products. To summarize, through the training in BIBAFOODS, 14 young researchers will achieve superior qualifications that will make them highly competitive and attractive for the European food and bio-tech industry.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2010-ITN | Award Amount: 3.50M | Year: 2011

In the understanding of the initiation and development of several diseases revolutionary changes are currently taking place. Cancer and brain diseases are examples of medical fields where new technologies are finding their way into research and applications, radically altering the way the diseases are being diagnosed and treated. Especially methods that yield information on molecular and cellular mechanisms open up the way for novel effective therapies for disease prevention and disease curing. The aim of this ITN is to conduct training and research in the field of novel bio-analytical methods and tools for cell based diseases, in specific for severe cancers and brain diseases. These methods and tools should allow faster and more reliable diagnosis, but are also of great importance for therapy research leading to novel treatment methods. This ITN combines disciplines such as engineering, biotechnology, medicine, and chip-technology and the consortium covers universities, hospitals and industry. The functionality of the devices is determined by the type of measurements that need to be performed, therefore we will focus on a few specific diseases: our cancer research will be aimed at skin cancer (melanoma) and blood cancer (leukaemia), and the part on brain diseases will focus on schizophrenia. Although we will direct our activities towards these three diseases in particular, we expect that the research (methods, devices, and technology) will also have impact on the understanding of other cancer types and other brain diseases.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 3.93M | Year: 2012

The generation of young biotechnologists is of paramount importance for Europes future. PHOTO.COMM will train primarily early stage researchers who have demonstrated high ambitions and talents in a unique platform based on emerging technology and science that would shape the forefront of future European biotechnology. PHOTO.COMM involves the utilization of microalgae for the conversion of carbon dioxide and water into chemicals and fuels, to directly replace finite fossil fuels and products. Although this is a rapidly growing industry, true societal impact cannot be expected until larger-scale production of low value end-products becomes a commercial reality. PHOTO.COMM has the primary objective of generating the next-generation scientists that will make a substantial and potentially game-changing contribution towards this global challenge. The young researchers will be trained in multidisciplinary science and innovation-based business creation to foster a new approach to microalgae based production and the use of synthetic photobiological communities. The researchers will also strengthen the core of photobiological metabolism by innovative approaches to enhance photosynthesis and carbon-assimilation and deliver new approaches to create valuable end-products. PHOTO.COMM will provide an exciting environment where the young researchers will absorb and implement state-of-the-art analytical methods, intellectual property and business principles and obtain extensive training and practical experience in close collaboration between universities and companies. Altogether, the educated next-generation scientists and their technologies are expected to make a strong contribution towards a future Europe in which both economically and environmentally sustainable photosynthetic biotechnology is a main supply of commodities and energy.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.8.7 | Award Amount: 3.48M | Year: 2011

Information technology is partly based on magnetism (memory) and partly on electricity (processors). Increasing control over individual electron charges and spins provides new device functionality. For both charges and spins, molecular devices provide ideal test beds, which have witnessed increased interest over the last decade but the understanding and control of which is still in an infant state. The aim of ELFOS is to take single-molecule electronics to the next level in which single molecule device functionality will be exploited. We will combine different experimental test beds to gain knowledge about molecular functionality with an emphasis on the spin degrees of freedom and how to exploit these in device configurations using electric fields. In information processing, spins have the general advantage over charges in that they are less sensitive to the coupling between the molecule and its environment and hence to the molecular orientation which is difficult to control at the atomic level. Furthermore, the control of molecular spins by electric fields is preferable over magnetic-field or light-driven control since it allows for the application of strong fields at a local scale and for the fast manipulation of spin states. Guided by theoretical studies of radically new concepts, we will manipulate the molecular spin either by controlling the charge states of the molecule by the gate or by the gate directly. The molecules of interest are single-molecule magnets, spin triangles, spin chains and spin-crossover compounds. The experiments should provide an answer to key questions such as: Can individual magnetic molecules be addressed electrically as bits or qubits? and How can they be used as switches? Applied aspects are long term with high risk and high potential for applications.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: ERC-AG | Phase: ERC-AG-SH6 | Award Amount: 2.49M | Year: 2011

Research problem: The 3rd and 2nd millennium was a period that saw major social and cultural transformations in Europe, from migrations and the introduction of metal (the Bronze Age) to new cultural identities and languages. As these two millennia were formative for Europes later history, these are hotly debated issues. However, they can now be resolved, at least in part, by the application of new science-based methodologies and the development of new interpretative frameworks. Aims and methodologies: The project does so by adopting an interdisciplinary methodological approach that combines science and culture. Isotope tracing in combination with recent advances in ancient DNA is employed to test human origins and movements during the two millennia, as well as the origin of wool and textiles. Lead isotope is adopted to trace the origin of copper. Based on this the project will document and explain the forging of new identities and new types of interaction during the 3rd and 2nd millennium BC in temperate northern Europe, but with implications for western Eurasia. Progress and originality: Accomplishment of front-line research results by combining archaeology with new developments in the natural sciences to produce new knowledge about the mobility of people, animals, things, ideas and technologies. This will allow a critical comparison of different types of evidence on mobility from DNA to strontium isotope analyses, and will lead to improved knowledge about the ways in which European regional cultures and identities were formed in the Bronze Age through interaction. Finally, the project will potentially change our understanding and thinking about human mobility as a key factor in cultural and social change.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 4.10M | Year: 2013

This ITN is built around the biological question of O-glycosylation in gastric cancer for training in systems glycobiology. For meeting the needs of the research goal and for training for future systems glycobiology operations, cross disciplinary international institutes have been identified with top level state-of-the-art glycobioanalytical, glycotechnological and glycobioinformatics platforms. These platforms will be utilized and adopted to address the biology. The researchers will be exposed to academia and industry working together to develop resources of common use for addressing complex biological questions. This has been shown in the area of proteomics, to be a successful way for developing bioinformatics, databases, software, bioanalysis, reagents and biomolecule synthesis/production. These resources are now in use throughout the life science environment in academia, biotech and biopharma. However, there is no individual institute to our knowledge that can prepare new systems glycobiologists for the full impact of the environment they will operate in. This ITN is addressing this deficiency in training, in order to contribute to make Europe a competitive environment for the new generation of multidisciplinary research for complex glycobiological questions. The training to address the systems glycobiology in gastric cancer will provide the researchers with biological and technological workshops and courses in project management and business operations together with bidirectional secondments between academia-industry. Two dedicated training partners have been identified in order to provide efficient on-site training and self studies promoted by E-learning. In the research process we will identify and transfer technologies and biological outcomes for commercialization. A significant part of the training will also be to provide researchers with techniques peripheral to the ones available on their home base.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2012-1.1.16. | Award Amount: 10.15M | Year: 2013

SYNTHESYS3 will create an accessible, integrated European resource for researchers in the natural sciences in Europe and globally. Building on the success of the previous SYNTHESYS IA, the NA will focus on improving collections management of new physical and virtual collections. By focusing the JRA on extracting and enhancing data from digitised collections, SYNTHESYS3 will increase the accessibility of these 390 million strong collections. A wide range of services and access both physical and digital will be provided to a broad range of scientific Users (from biological and geological related disciplines) in a consistent and accessible way. The natural history collections, held within the museums and herbaria, of Europe are World-class in terms of their magnitude and taxonomic coverage. They represent a resource unique in Europe as a model of the diversity of life on earth and are a physical dataset enabling Users to research how the human activity (including climate change) is having an increasingly negative impact on the diversity and distribution of biodiversity, which is threatening the continued provision of ecosystem services essential to human well-being.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENV.2012.6.2-2 | Award Amount: 11.59M | Year: 2012

Sustainable governance of our biological resources requires reliable scientific knowledge that meets the needs of society. Current biodiversity observation systems and environmental datasets are unbalanced in coverage and not integrated, limiting integrative analyses and implementation of environmental policies. EU BON presents an innovative approach towards integration of biodiversity information systems from on-ground to remote sensing data, for addressing policy and information needs in a timely and customized manner. EU BON will provide integration between social networks of science and policy and technological networks of interoperating IT infrastructures, resulting in a new open-access platform for sharing biodiversity data and tools, and greatly advance biodiversity knowledge in Europe. EU BONs 30 partners from 18 countries are members of networks of biodiversity data-holders, monitoring organisations, and leading scientific institutions. EU BON will build on existing components, in particular GBIF, LifeWatch infrastructures, and national biodiversity data centres. EU BON will 1) enable greater interoperability of data layers and systems through adoption of new standards; 2) advance data integration by new (modelling) technologies; 3) increase data mobilisation via scientific communities, citizen scientists, and potential data users; 4) develop strategies for future harmonizing and mainstreaming of biodiversity recording and monitoring; 5) improve analytical tools and services interpreting biodiversity data; 6) support the science-policy interface by timely information and scenario development; 7) link integrated, customized information to relevant stakeholders, and 8) strengthen overall European capacities and infrastructures for environmental information management. EU BONs deliverables include a comprehensive European Biodiversity Portal for all stakeholder communities, and strategies for a global implementation of GEO BON and supporting IPBES.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SiS.2012.2.2.3-1 | Award Amount: 5.35M | Year: 2013

ASSIST-ME is a high level research project with a societal impact that will investigate formative and summative assessment methods to support and to improve inquiry-based approaches in European science, technology and mathematics (STM) education. Based on an analysis of what is known about summative and formative assessment of knowledge, skills and attitudes related to key STM competences and an analysis of European educational systems, the project will design a range of combined assessment methods. These methods will be tested in primary and secondary schools in different educational cultures in Europe in order to analyse the conditions that support or undermine the uptake of formative assessment related to inquiry processes. The resulting synthesis of opportunities and restrictions for implementing an assessment culture using both formative and summative approaches will be evaluated and discussed in relevant forums in order to formulate guidelines and recommendations for policy makers, curriculum developers, teacher trainers and other stakeholders in the different European educational systems.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.97M | Year: 2016

This network brings together world-leading experts in nano-science and technology from 6 European countries in order to achieve breakthroughs in understanding and successful utilization of nanoscale solid-state spin systems in emerging quantum technologies. The proposed innovative science in the supra-disciplinary field of physics and applications of spin nano-systems will underpin breakthrough developments in quantum computing, quantum communications and networks, and nano-imaging. Important innovative step consolidating the joint effort of the whole consortium is the focus on crystalline solids where magnetic interactions of electron spins with lattice nuclei are negligible and well-controlled. We will develop electrically-controlled spin-quantum-bits (qubits) in Si-Ge quantum dots and nanowires; will optically manipulate spin impurities in diamond in applications for quantum computing and networks and in nano-magnetometry; will achieve new understanding of quantum phenomena due to the spin-valley coupling in atomically thin 2D semiconductors, an emerging class of materials with a promise for quantum technologies. Research training to 15 early stage researchers will be delivered by 14 academic and 7 industrial groups. Network-wide training course in transferable skills will be specially developed and delivered by the Think Ahead (Sheffield), an award winning initiative at the University of Sheffield (award by the Times Higher Education, 2014). Current proposal is designed to advance this multi-disciplinary research field significantly beyond the state-of-the-art, and train a new cohort of researchers capable of developing spin-based solid-state quantum technologies towards real-life applications in the next 5 to 10 years.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.91M | Year: 2015

We need to increase the crop yield while reducing pesticide and use of inorganic fertiliser to meet the challenges of world population growth and climate change. Plant endophytic microorganisms can improve plant yield and enhance plant tolerance to abiotic stress as well as to pathogens under experimental conditions, but these effects are often not sufficiently stable for practical application. How do we boost the stability and reliability of the positive effects of endophytes on plants? We need to understand the genetic basis of beneficial interactions between crops and endophytes and extent this basis exhibits phenotypic plasticity at all interaction levels from the cellular to the field environment. This requires increasing our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of endophytes, including intra and inter-kingdom exchange and distribution of resources (nutrients), signalling and possibly regulation between and inside the partners, the mutual induced production of secondary metabolites and the environmental cues which influence crop-endophyte interactions. The genetic variation and its plasticity in host and microbe will be exploited in to establish crop breeding and inoculum production processes for boosting the establishment and stability of plant-microbe mutualisms to benefit crop development, stress tolerance, pathogen resistance and quality. In this project we will provide fundamental biological as well as practical knowledge about interactions between endophytes and plants. This improved understanding will pave the way for increased use of endophytes to improve sustainability and plant productivity in a reliable way. The participants in this project comprise many of the key institutions and industries working with these problems and provide a uniquely strong consortium to address the key issues. Furthermore, the consortium will train a new generation of scientists who have the insight and skills to continue this task in their careers.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2012.1.2-09 | Award Amount: 7.78M | Year: 2012

Benthic ecosystems provide important goods and services, such as fisheries products and supporting, regulation and cultural services. There is serious concern about the adverse impact of fisheries on benthic ecosystem which may negatively affect the fisheries yield and integrity of the sea bed. To develop an integrated approach to the management of human activities in the marine environment, in particular fishing, there is a need to develop quantitative tools to assess the impact of fisheries on the benthic ecosystem and at the same time collaborate with the fishing industry to develop innovative technologies and new management approaches to reduce the impact on benthic ecosystems. BENTHIS will provide the knowledge to further develop the ecosystem approach to fisheries management as required in the Common Fisheries Policy and the Marine Strategy Framework Directive. It will study the diversity of benthic ecosystem in European waters and the role of benthic species in the ecosystem functioning. Fisheries impacts will be studied on benthic organisms and on the geo-chemistry. The newly acquired knowledge will be synthesized in a number of generic tools that will be combined into a fishing/seabed habitat risk assessment method that will be applied to fisheries in the Baltic, North Sea, Western waters, Mediterranean and Black Sea. Fisheries will be selected with the fishing industry based on the impact on the benthic ecosystem. BENTHIS will integrate fishing industry partners to collaborate in testing the performance of innovative technologies to reduce fishing impact. Finally, in collaboration with the fishing industry and other stakeholders, new management approaches will be developed and tested on their effects on the ecosystem and the socio-economic consequences. As such BENTHIS will the urgently needed scientific basis to integrate the role of marine benthic ecosystems in fisheries management.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE.2010.3.5-04 | Award Amount: 7.74M | Year: 2011

There is a strong need for new thermostable hydrolases with appropriate performance and/or novel functionalities that could provide huge savings in time, money and energy for industrial processes. The HotZyme project aims to identify such enzymes from hot terrestial environments, using metagenomic screening methods. New bioinfomatic tools will be developed to facilitate function prediction of genes from metagenomes that show low or no sequence homology to enzymes of known function. A range of high-throughput screening technologies will be employed to identify novel hydrolases. The consortium is composed of 13 partners from 10 European countries plus one partner from USA. The strong expertise in Microbiology, Moleculary Biology, Biochemistry, Biophysics, Geochemistry, Nanotechnology and Bioinformatics from our partners will be integrated in the project to ensure the fulfilment of the proposed tasks. Importantly, the five industrial partners, including three SMEs, will seek to commercialize the project results, thus ensuring a European wide impact, post project.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: ENV.2009.5.1.0.2 | Award Amount: 1.14M | Year: 2010

Genetic biodiversity is recognised by the Convention on Biological Diversity and the EC Biodiversity Strategy as one of three essential elements of living diversity, yet it is poorly represented at the policy level, compared to the two other components, species and ecosystems. The CONGRESS consortium aims to rectify this situation by delivering dissemination tools which policy makers and conservation managers can conveniently use to incorporate genetic biodiversity into their policy framework. The six work packages of this project fall into two components. The first component comprises WPs 1 5 which will provide a one-stop, community-enabled web portal, including the following components. WP1 concerns web portal design and construction. WP2 will provide databases on academics and professional end-users, publications and genetic data for key European species of conservation concern. WP3 will provide a simulation tool for biodiversity managers to assess the power of genetic data to reveal processes which may result in genetic erosion. WP4 will provide a decision matrix module to allow end-users to establish optimal policy and management options given the genetic data which have been produced. WP5 will provide a knowledge pack and information leaflets, translated into the main European languages, which can be assembled into a manual. The second component is WP6, which comprises a series of dissemination and exchange workshops carried out across the European Union, including a transborder workshop and hands-on demonstration meeting in Eastern Europe. CONGRESS will integrate and enhance these work packages by using the workshops as forums to discuss the contents of the portal and will be guided by an end-user advisory group, who will oversee the development of these tools and ensure their utility for the community who will benefit from them.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-15-2014 | Award Amount: 6.00M | Year: 2015

Stem Cell therapy in IschEmic Non-treatable Cardiac diseasE (SCIENCE) With more than 17 million deaths worldwide each year, ischemic heart disease (IHD) caused by coronary artery disease is the most common cause of death and a major cause of hospital admissions in industrialised countries. IHD caused over four million deaths in Europe in the year 2012 constituting 47% of all deaths. Today IHD is the main cause of death among women throughout Europe and the main cause of death among men in all but six European countries. Conventional therapies have reduced mortality of IHD significantly, but have left an increasing number of patients with chronic IHD and/or heart failure without further treatment options. An increasing morbidity rate of this nature in an ageing population is a huge burden for society. The overall aim of the SCIENCE project is to implement an effective stem cell-based therapy with allogeneic adipose derived stromal cells to improve myocardial function in patients with ischemic heart disease and heart failure. This goal will be achieved by conducting a multicentre clinical trial in a strong consortium of experienced international scientists and experts as well as significant representatives of the biomedical industry within translational medicine and a close collaboration with relevant authorities. The consortium will ensure feasibility of treatment by simplifying and rationalising cell production and distribution using state-of-the art manufacturing technology that makes cell therapy a realistic option for clinical practise. The consortium expects the SCIENCE project to pave the way for future approval of this treatment by national authorities throughout Europe as the standard form of care for patients with ischemic heart disease and heart failure. This concept will establish a new platform for growth and consolidation of innovative small and medium-size companies within stem cell research and development. Such a platform will ease implementati


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN | Award Amount: 3.31M | Year: 2011

The main objective of the international training network UPStream is the training of a novel generation of European scientist in a critical and complex field of modern biology: the understanding of the regulation of the UPS and its potential use for drug development. The importance of this process is illustrated by the imperious necessity to destroy certain proteins during several phases of the cell cycle in order to progress to the next phase. The biochemical process of ubiquitylation is an efficient way to label proteins that will be targeted to degradation by the proteasome at the right time and cellular compartment, according to the cell necessities. In addition, this post-translational modification also offers to the cell the possibility to control other processes related or not to proteolytic functions. Indeed, the attachment of ubiquitin (Ub) or ubiquitin-like (UBL) molecules such as SUMO and NEDD8 does not always result in proteolysis, but can induce conformational and/or interaction changes driving a large diversity of effects. Considering the interconnectivity among Ub and UBL molecules, we end up with an extremely complex system regulating protein activity and stability. Given the implications of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) in many essential cellular processes, the technology required to study this system is very diverse. As part of the proposed network the latest technological developments (please see implementation) will be used to explore chemical, biochemical, molecular, developmental and genetic aspects of the UPS. This research area has become an area of investigation by itself, very attractive for fundamental scientists as well as for the pharmaceutical industry aiming to identify potential targets for drug development to be used in many diseases where this system has been shown to be vital.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE-2009-1-2-14 | Award Amount: 3.88M | Year: 2010

Removal of a forage fish has consequences for both predators and prey of forage fish. As everything is connected, every management action has a price which goes beyond the apparent, direct effect on the target species. The fishery on forage fish can therefore not be seen in isolation, as the immediate gain in profit from the fishery has to be discounted by the lowered potential for production of large piscivorous fish. Management actions on other species also influences forage fish, i.e. conservation efforts on marine mammals or sea birds have direct consequences for the predation pressure on forage fish. The objective of the project is to provide insight and quantitative advice on the ecosystem wide consequences of management actions directly or indirectly related to forage fish. The two overarching questions are: 1. What are the consequences of forage fish fisheries on (a) predator growth and abundance, (b) economic output of fisheries on piscivorous species, and (c) ecosystem stability and the risk for regime shifts? 2. What are the consequences of changes in predator populations on forage fish populations and fisheries? The methods is a combination of ecosystem models, of process studies aimed at feeding into the models, of economical models, and of data-analysis of existing data sources. The project covers four ecosystems in detail; Norwegian-Barents Sea, Baltic Sea, North Sea and Bay of Biscay. FACTS bring together leading European fisheries and university institutes working on creating the tools for ecosystem based management. The active involvement of the institutes in the current management provides a means for the results of the project to feed into management. The project furthermore includes a network component which ensures a wider dissemination of methods and results within the marine scientific community.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-14-2015 | Award Amount: 7.10M | Year: 2016

Short Bowel Syndrome (SBS) is a condition that occurs when part or the entire small intestine is missing or has been removed during surgery. This condition renders the bowel incapable of fulfilling its nutritional function (intestinal failure). There is no cure for SBS. Parenteral (intravenous) nutrition (PN) and bowel transplantation are currently the preferred options for nutrition in children and adults who have lost their bowel. PN offers a low survival rate, compromised quality of life, and the economic cost for each patient is estimated to be 55,000 euro/year. Small intestinal transplant is also an option with one-year and 4-year survival rates of 90% and 60% respectively. However, because of the shortage of organs, high mortality, the severe side effects of immunosuppression and low quality of life, this is still a sub-optimal solution. The objective of this programme is to deliver a functional bowel reconstruction to patients with SBS through an autologous tissue engineering strategy, overcoming the shortage of organs, and avoiding the need for immunosuppression. It will be achieved by identifying the best autologous cell source; providing the ideal scaffold; engineering functional intestine for transplantation and engaging with patients, scientists and public. The work is designed to lead directly to a clinical trial for the application of the optimal protocol for tissue-engineered intestine. The consortium is uniquely positioned to complete this ambitious effort as we have an internationally pre-eminent, multi-disciplinary team, which possesses a combination of expertise from basic molecular biology, engineering, and surgery, combining knowledge from universities, hospitals and industry. Importantly we are one of the few groups in the world with experience, infrastructure, and track record to translate regenerative medicine solutions to patients, including true clinical translation of tissue engineered organs.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: INFRADEV-03-2016-2017 | Award Amount: 4.97M | Year: 2017

The INFRAFRONTIER RI integrates European Mouse Clinics and the European Mouse Mutant Archive with the common goal to ensure access to mouse models for basic research of human health and disease, and to translate this knowledge into therapeutic approaches for the benefit of the European society. The expanded INFRAFRONTIER2020 network, coordinated by the INFRAFRONTIER GmbH, includes 3 SMEs and is strategically responding to the INFRADEV3 call with aligned objectives to advance the long-term sustainability which are 1) development of business models and a stable legal framework; 2) raise awareness of the INFRAFRONTIER RI; 3) provide bespoke services aligned with user demands; 4) promote best practices in mouse phenogenomics; 5) enhance robustness of the INFRAFRONTIER IT infrastructure and use of the EMMA strain resource; and 6) improve business processes. Towards achieving these objectives key INFRAFRONTIER2020 project deliverables are: INFRAFRONTIER Business Plan2.0, and business models for all services Stable legal framework built on the INFRAFRONTIER legal entity INFRAFRONTIER annual stakeholder conferences Customised mouse model and secondary phenotyping pilot services INFRAFRONTIER advanced training schools in mouse phenogenomics Reengineered EMMA Database2.0 system Annotated mouse models of human diseases Quality management system for the legal entity INFRAFRONTIER2020 will 1) enhance the sustainable operation of the INFRAFRONTIER RI; 2) continue to structure the ERA, 3) foster innovation, and 4) address major societal challenges in human health by customised service pilots supporting research into common and rare diseases. A sustainable INFRAFRONTIER RI will ensure the quality of deposited mice and support the reproducibility of biological results. Outreach efforts will raise awareness of resources and services and facilitate sustainable engagement with industry and global consortia such as the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN | Award Amount: 3.52M | Year: 2012

TRAIN-ASAP addresses a very urgent public health issue. The lack of effective antibacterial drugs against resistant bacteria poses a serious threat to human health and has huge economical consequences to the healthcare system. The objective of this ITN is to fill the current gap between the burden of infections due to resistant bacteria and the strong need for alternative solutions to combat antibiotic resistance in both humans and animals. Young researchers will be trained in the scientific and complementary skills needed to implement a broad range of antibacterial approaches including discovery of new antibiotics, synthesis of antimicrobial peptides with improved pharmacological properties, improvement of the clinical efficacy of currently known drugs, and alternative strategies based on phages and bacteriocin-producing organisms. TRAIN-ASAP is a multidisciplinary and intersectorial ITN dedicated to the scientific and professional training of 14 early-stage researchers, including 2 financed by the University of Copenhagen, with the aim to develop novel antibacterial solutions for humans and animals. The consortium includes 7 academic institutions, 9 private enterprises and 2 national research centres representing 9 countries. The training programme is characterized by a unique innovative and multidisciplinary approach based on the use of front line research tools in molecular biology, combinatorial chemistry and in vivo pharmacology, an appropriate balance between scientific and generic skills training, and a strong contribution by the private partners in the form of mentoring, courses and secondments. Considering the urgent need for new drugs to combat antibiotic resistance and the growing demand for skilled scientists specialised in antibacterial drug discovery, TRAIN-ASAP is expected to have a strong impact on the careers of the trainees and result in a lasting collaboration between the partners and political, societal and economical benefits to Europe.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: NMP.2011.2.2-3 | Award Amount: 5.35M | Year: 2012

The suggested project aims at developing a nanowire (NW) technology applied to III-nitride and III-V materials to improve the present Solid State Lighting (SSL) solutions. Present white light emitting diode (LED) emitters are based on thin film III-nitride technology, and a combination of violet-blue LEDs and suitable phosphor coatings has yielded a light emission efficacy of > 100 lm/W with an operating lifetime > 50000 hrs in commercial white LEDs. The color rendering is generally unsatisfactory, however, and the cost is so far prohibitive for general market penetration. Our NW approach is based on combining three (blue-green-red) or four (blue-green-yellow-red) single NW LEDs into one white LED package, thereby avoiding the loss in the phosphor downconversion process. Using NW LEDs we also expect to increase the radiative efficiency due to a drastic reduction of the defect density in the active quantum well (QW) regions of the LEDs, and also improve the extraction efficiency of the emitted light. Our suggested employment of large size silicon or sapphire wafers as substrates is predicted to reduce the future fabrication cost by at least a factor 3. To increase the efficiency of white emitters it is necessary to drastically improve the LEDs emitting in the green-yellow part of the spectrum. We suggest to reach the green LED range by the ability to increase the In composition in the radial QWs of the presently grown nitride NW LEDs, and by using AlGaInP materials. The latter material system will also be explored for yellow and red NW LED emission. To realize yellow-red emission quantum dot media will also be employed, either by the SK growth mechanism on the m-plane facets of the NWs, or by separate application of InP/ZnS core-shell dots with red emission. To realize this work a consortium of five partners is suggested, comprising excellent expertise in growth of NWs and in sophisticated studies of structural, electronic and optical properties of the NWs, and also processing into efficient LED structures having long life-times. The safety issues in the growth and handling of NWs are secured in collaboration with the Nano-Safety project at ULUND. The materials used are favorable from the environmental point of view.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2011-1.1.17. | Award Amount: 15.90M | Year: 2012

Advanced solutions to the challenges that confront our technology-based society from energy and environment to health are crucially dependent on advanced knowledge of material properties down to the atomic scale. Neutron and Muon spectroscopy offer unique analytical tools for material investigation. They are thus an indispensible building block of the European Research Area and directly address the objectives of the Innovation Union Flagship Initiative. The knowledge creation via neutron and muon spectroscopy relies on the performance of a closely interdependent eco-system comprising large-scale facilities and academic and industrial users. The Integrated Infrastructure Initiative for Neutron and Muon Spectroscopy (NMI3) aims at a pan-European integration of the main actors within this eco-system. The NMI3 coordination effort will render public investment more efficient by harmonizing and reinforcing the services provided to the user community. It will thus directly contribute to maintaining Europes world-leading position. NMI3 is a comprehensive consortium of 18 partners from 11 different countries that includes all major providers of neutrons and muons in Europe. NMI3 exploits all tools available within I3s to realize its objectives. - Transnational Open Access will build further capacity for European users. It will foster mobility and improve the overall creation of scientific knowledge by providing the best researchers with the opportunity to use the most adapted infrastructures. - Joint Research activities will create synergies in innovative instrument development that will feed directly into improved and more efficient provision of services to the users. - Networking activities will reinforce integration by harmonizing procedures, setting standards and disseminating knowledge. Particular attention is given to train young people via the European Neutron and Muon School as well as through an e-learning platform.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2012-1.1.4. | Award Amount: 12.42M | Year: 2013

The mouse shows great similarities in development, physiology and biochemistry to humans, which makes it a key model for research into human disease. The major challenges for mouse functional genomics in the 21st century are to: Develop a series of mutant alleles for every gene in the mouse genome Determine the phenotypic consequences of each mutation Identify mouse models for the complete disease spectrum in humans To further develop and exploit the emerging mouse mutant resource, mouse models must be preserved and made available to the European biomedical research community. To this effect, the Infrafrontier-I3 project brings together the leading European centers for systemic phenotyping of mouse mutants and the European Mouse Mutant Archive network. The Infafrontier-I3 partners aim to meet the future challenges presented by phenotyping, archiving and disseminating mouse models in the ERA as follows: Contribute to resource development by archiving of 1215 new mouse mutant lines Provide free of charge Transnational Access to mouse production and 1st line phenotyping capacities Offer a specialized axenic service to produce, maintain and to distribute germ-free mice Provide user friendly accession of Infrafrontier services, extensive manual data curation and cross referencing with other mouse database Improve user services by developing novel phenotyping and cryopreservation SOPs and by refining innovative research instrumentation Engage with the user community using a wide range of PR activities, a dedicated user meeting and an industry liaison workshop Offer state of the art cryopreservation and phenotyping training courses Benchmark Infrafrontier services with other major repositories The comprehensive physical and data resources that will be generated by Infrafrontier-I3 will contribute to link basic biomedical research to medical applications and thereby drive innovation and support the Europe 2020 Strategy.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-11-2015 | Award Amount: 6.00M | Year: 2016

Companion diagnostics are crucial for drug development and disease management with regard to patient selection, therapy planning and monitoring. Nanomedicines such as antibodies have been proven to be optimal disease-targeting agents because they generally exhibit superior target uptake and retention. However, to date, nuclear imaging of nanomedicines has been limited to the use of long-lived isotopes to be compatible with the slow pharmacokinetics of these large molecules. Major drawbacks are high radiation doses, precluding routine and repeated companion imaging procedures. The Click-It consortium aims to circumvent this issue by using pretargeting approach, which centers on the administration and target binding of a tagged nanomedicine followed by administration and binding of a small, fast-clearing, short-lived radiolabeled probe to the tag of the nanomedicine. This results in lower absorbed radiation doses and in a boost in target-blood ratios, which in turn leads to a superior imaging contrast. PET scan snapshots at multiple time-points provide long-term imaging information by applying short-lived nuclides. So far, only the fastest click reaction, the tetrazine ligation, has demonstrated potential in clinically relevant conditions. Recently, we have shown in a SPECT imaging study that this click reaction can be applied for non-internalizing nanomedicines in vivo. This project aims at expanding the scope of click-pretargeted imaging to intracellular targets, because a majority of nanomedicines internalize and is thus not accessible with the current approach. Furthermore, we will expand our approach to short-lived, non-metal based, small molecule 18F-PET tracers, since PET offers a higher spatial and temporal resolution enabling quantitative decision making in disease diagnosis and management. Finally, the project aims to translate the developed click-pretargeting technology into a clinically applicable nanomedicine-based imaging approach in canine patients.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CPCSA | Phase: INFRA-2010-1.2.1 | Award Amount: 2.44M | Year: 2010

EDGIs aim is to deploy desktop grid (DG) and cloud services for EGI user communities that are heavy users of DCIs and require extremely large multi-national e-infrastructure. In order to achieve this goal software components of ARC, gLite, Unicore, BOINC, XWHEP, ADICS, 3G Bridge, OpenNebula, Eucalyptus will be integrated into SG?DG?Cloud platforms for service provision and as a result EDGI will extend ARC, gLite and Unicore grids with volunteer and institutional DG systems. EDGI will create novel QoS support for the DG systems and will explore new service provision models in order to ensure harmonised DG?Cloud interfaces to ARC, gLite, Unicore resources. EDGI will provide a workflow-oriented science gateway to enable user communities to more easily access the EDGI infrastructure. EDGI will establish the EuroCivis organization to coordinate DG-related activities in Europe both for solving technical issues as well as to attract volunteer DG resource donors by disseminating results of the EDGI and EGI projects. EuroCivis and EDGI will work in strong collaboration with EGI, EMI, NorduGrid, Unicore Forum and interested NGIs.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.8.0 | Award Amount: 3.26M | Year: 2011

SE2ND is a joint experimental and theoretical effort. SE2ND strives to develop a highly efficient and continuous solid-state source of spatially separated spin-entangled electrons. A source of this kind, integrated with other electronic elements, will be of great importance in future quantum processors, where they provide, for example, entanglement distribution required to synchronize quantum circuits, and enable secure communication. The project will exploit entangled electron pairs that naturally occur in the ground state of a superconductor. The key target device of SE2ND is an electron-pair splitter with two defining key functions: 1) it ensures that pairs are emitted one by one, and 2) the two electrons of the pair are spatially separated by directing them into two different output channels, while maintaining their entanglement. Both objectives can be realized in carefully tuned double quantum dots. Hybrid double quantum dots will be realized in high-quality low-dimensional materials (semiconducting nanowires, carbon nanotubes and graphene) and integrated together with superconducting injectors, serving as sources of the electron pairs, ferromagnetic elements and microwave cavities in order to assess the degree of pair splitting and electron entanglement. SE2ND will explore the relevant material and fabrication parameters, optimize the splitting efficiency, assess the spin relaxation rate, coherence and the degree of entanglement to provide an optimized source with near to unity efficiency. SE2ND will extensively develop hybrid nanodevices which exploit the unique properties of quantum dots in proximity to superconductors and ferromagnetic materials, thereby providing a novel toolbox for electron-based quantum information technology, helping to maintain Europe at the forefront of this rapidly evolving field.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2011.2.4.3-2 | Award Amount: 9.96M | Year: 2011

The DIABAT project will employ knowledge of the function, dysfunction and physiological regulation of brown adipocytes to develop innovative therapeutic and preventive strategies for type 2 diabetes. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is currently a worldwide recognized target to combat obesity and diabetes due to last years re-discovery of functional BAT in adult humans by several of the members of the DIABAT network (van Marken LIchtenbelt et al., N. Engl. J. Med. 360, 1500, 2009; Virtanen, Enerbck & Nuutila, N. Engl. J. Med. 360, 1518, 2009) along with sharp rise in insight in cellular, genetic, and regulatory mechanisms from animal studies. Therefore, the DIABAT project aims at recruiting and re-activating endogenous energy-dissipating BAT as a preventive and/or remedial measure for weight and blood sugar control in obesity-related type 2 diabetes (diabesity), thereby halting or preventing destruction and facilitating recovery of pancreatic beta-cells under diabetic conditions.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: ENV.2009.1.1.1.1 | Award Amount: 9.23M | Year: 2010

Past4Future will combine multidisciplinary paleoclimate records from ice cores, marine cores, speleothems, pollen and other records, concentrating on a global distribution of the records, to reconstruct climate change and variability during the present interglacial (the Holocene) and the last interglacial (known as the Eemian in northwestern Europe and as marine isotope stage 5e in the marine sediment records). The records will be combined in integrated analyses aided by proxy modeling and assimilation, to gain understanding of the climate processes involved in the dynamics of interglacial climates. Earth system models (ESM) including physical and biogeochemical processes will be applied to simulate the past and present interglacial climate, and to confront and intercompare the simulations with climate changes as observed from the palaeodata; this will both advance the models and our understanding of the dynamics and predictability of the climate system. Focus will be on the most recent two interglacial periods, as these provide the highest-resolved most comprehensive data records. Moreover the last interglacial represents a situation where the mean state was warmer than at present in large regions due to orbital forcing, thereby allowing tests of climate system sensitivity to constrain projections of potential future ice sheet, sea-level, circulation and biogeochemical changes. The data and Earth system model results will be used improve our capabilities to project future global and regional warming from a better understanding of relevant paleoclimates, especially in relation to sea level changes, sea ice changes and thermohaline circulation changes. The Past4Future program will draw together a world leading team of European and international partners in a concerted effort to advance our knowledge on the causes, processes and risks of abrupt changes in warm periods, such as those projected for the current and the next century. The program will inform the international debate on climate system stability and the dissemination of results will be targeted to both citizens and governmental and non-governmental stakeholders. It will leave a legacy of improved understanding of past drivers of sea level changes, changes of sea ice, and of greenhouse gas concentrations, and it will train a new generation of young climate researchers to further advance research and improved future predictions for the benefit of society and our capacity to mitigate and adapt to climate changes.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE.2010.2.2-01 | Award Amount: 11.79M | Year: 2011

Full4Health is a multidisciplinary European collaboration of internationally renowned laboratories investigating the mechanisms of hunger, satiety and feeding behaviour, effects of dietary components and food structure on these processes, and their possible exploitation in addressing obesity, chronic disease and under-nutrition. The proposal integrates investigation of both human volunteers (dietary/exercise intervention studies and administration of encapsulated nutrients) and laboratory animals with emphasis on neuronal, hormonal, molecular, physiological and psychological responses to food at different stages of the life course. We will apply imaging and other cutting edge technologies in both humans and rodents to answer critical research questions at different levels of the food-gut-brain axis. In human volunteers, responses to diet will be investigated from childhood through to the elderly, whereas wide-ranging cutting-edge rodent studies will investigate related issues such as early developmental programming the food-gut-brain axis, multiple feedback signalling interactions, and inflammation-induced anorexia. The project will examine the interaction of food and dietary components with the gastrointestinal tract, and will characterise the role of gut endocrine secretions, the vagus nerve, and hindbrain, hypothalamic and forebrain structures in signalling and integration of hunger and satiety. Physiological and psychological responses to food may change as we develop and age, with impact on food choices and preferences. This is a critical issue in the battle against food intake-related chronic disease, most commonly driven by over-consumption, but also in consideration of relative under-nutrition in the elderly and clinically compromised.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: ENV.2010.1.1.2-1 | Award Amount: 9.81M | Year: 2011

The Pan-European Gas-AeroSOls-climate interaction Study (PEGASOS) European large scale integrating project brings together most of the leading European research groups, with state-of the-art observational and modeling facilities to: (1) Quantify the magnitude of regional to global feedbacks between atmospheric chemistry and a changing climate and to reduce the corresponding uncertainty of the major ones. (2) Identify mitigation strategies and policies to improve air quality while limiting their impact on climate change. The project is organized into four scientific Themes designed to optimize the integration of methodologies, scales, and ultimately our understanding of air quality and climate interactions: (I) Anthropogenic and biogenic emissions and their response to climate and socio-economy (II) Atmospheric interactions among chemical and physical processes (III) Regional and global links between atmospheric chemistry and climate change (IV) Air quality in a changing climate: Integration with policy PEGASOS will bridge the spatial and temporal scales that connect local surface-air pollutant exchanges, air quality and weather with global atmospheric chemistry and climate. Our major focus for air quality will be Europe including effects of changes in pollutant emissions elsewhere and the time horizon for the study will be the next 50 years. During the project we will provide improved process understanding in areas of major uncertainty for better quantification of feedbacks between air quality and a changing climate. We will present, for the first time, a fully integrated analysis of dynamically changing emissions and deposition, their link to tropospheric chemical reactions and interactions with climate, and emerging feedbacks between chemistry-climate and surface processes. We will target both local and regional scales, taking into account chemistry and climate feedbacks on the global scale.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2008-1.1.1 | Award Amount: 9.65M | Year: 2009

SYNTHESYS IA will aid in the evolution of a European resource through the creation an accessible, integrated infrastructure for researchers in the natural sciences in Europe and globally. By focusing the JRA on DNA extraction, SYNTHESYS IA will increase the opportunities for Users to exploit a largely untapped facet of the 337 million strong collections. Users will be able to play an active role in generating new knowledge based on molecular and morphological studies. A range of new services and improved access both physical and digital will be provided to a broad range of scientific Users (from biological and geological related disciplines) in a consistent and more easily accessible way. The new tools to be developed and disseminated will give Users the chance to pursue new avenues for independent studies at the leading edge of biodiversity and environmental research.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: ERC-SyG | Phase: ERC-2013-SyG | Award Amount: 12.50M | Year: 2014

The cryosphere is in fast transition. The possibility that the ongoing rapid demise of Arctic sea ice may instigate abrupt changes on the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) is not tackled by current research. Ice cores from the GIS show clear evidence of past abrupt warm events,up to 15 degrees warming in less than a decade, possibly caused by disappearing se ice in the Nordic Seas..Arctic sea ice extent was in 2012 half of the 1979-2000 average. Satellite data document an increasing loss of GIS ice mass since 1990 and temperatures have risen markedly at the GIS summit. Strong transient changes in both Arctic cryospheric entities prompts the question: Is the dramatic decline in Arctic Sea Ice heralding a new phase of abrupt change, similar to those recorded in ocean sediments and ice cores? Such changes would have major consequences for the GIS mass balance and global climate and sea level. Ice2Ice will approach this complex problem by integrating 4 PI teams from three Nordic world class research centres comprising empiricists and dynamicists specialized in Arctic and Greenland atmospheric, oceanic and cryospheric sciences. With an innovative combination of synchronized records of GIS parameters, records of sea ice change and models ranging from global climate models to regional and process models, Ice2Ice will be the first concerted effort to tackle the question of the cause and future implications of past abrupt climate change in Greenland, the main hypothesis being that Arctic and sub-Arctic sea ice cover is key to understand past and future Greenland temperature and ice sheet variations. In Ice2Ice this will be done by:a)describing the nature, timing and extent of abrupt events across climate archives,b)resolving mechanisms behind the sudden demise of sea ice cover,c)identifying the risk that the ongoing rapid diminution of Arctic sea ice cover could give abrupt GIS changes in the future, d)determining the impacts of such changes for the GIS, Arctic and global climate.


According to 2007 Eurostat statistics, there is a robust need to better understanding the nutritional existing barriers to healthy nutrition of 79 million EU-27 citizens at-risk-of-poverty. These European subclusters and ethnic populations have in common low purchasing power, limited education and the highest risk of diet-related diseases due to sub-optimal nutrition. CHANCE project will i) define an innovative strategy based on a socio-economic study of the composition of the most significant EU populations at-risk-of-poverty and ii) verify the relative existing nutritional deficiency via a holistic approach ensured by metabonomics investigations correlating the non-healthy diet to real metabolism alterations. CHANCE intends to adopt a new multidisciplinary approach, leading to nutritional strategies for the prevention of malnutrition in population groups at risk of poverty. CHANCE aims at considering a new health value-added diet as a whole by developing food products which could act in concert. The synergic collaboration of nutritionists, food chemists, economists and technologists allow a robust strategy to by pass all barriers to healthy nutrition by the lab-scale development of affordable but nutritionally-rich food products, new packaging and portioning. The R&D activities planned in the enlarged European Union will facilitate a proactive collaboration among food research centers and food processing and packaging SMEs that will be further transferred with the generated foreground. During the processing of food products, nutrient content and stability will be assessed, then the whole technology process will get the influential support of a CEN Workshop Agreement, drafted within CEN (the European Committee for Standardization) in order to help ensuring consumers with a controlled quality. CHANCE nutritional and educational strategies will produce guidelines for European Public Health policy dealing with the prevention of malnutrition in such population groups. The European Food Information Council will ensure that the progress and results from CHANCE will be communicated and disseminated widely.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE.2011.1.2-01 | Award Amount: 3.75M | Year: 2011

Farming practices that lead to declining returns and inputs of carbon (C) to soils pose a threat to soil functions by reducing availability of organic matter for soil microbes and by affecting soil structure, and soil C stocks that are key to regulating greenhouse gas emissions. SmartSOIL focuses on arable and mixed farming systems in Europe and will develop an innovative approach using the soil C flow and stocks concept to assess the impact of C management on crop productivity, soil organic C (SOC) stocks and other ecosystem services. SmartSOIL will identify and develop options to increase C stocks and optimise C use (flows) whilst maintaining sustainable SOC stocks. The flow and stocks concept will delineate short- versus long-term management effects on vital soil functions through meta-analyses of data from European long-term experiments (LTEs), as well as new measurements within LTEs. The new understanding will be used to improve existing soil and crop simulation models and test the models against independent LTE data. The models will then be used to derive a simplified model to estimate the short- and long-term effects of management on crop productivity and SOC storage. Scenarios of future management systems in Europe for improved productivity and enhanced SOC sequestration will be evaluated under current and future climate. The cost-effectiveness of alternative policy measures and options for managing SOC flows and stocks for improved productivity and SOC storage will be assessed based on the simplified model. SmartSOIL will develop a decision support tool (DST) to enable farmers, advisors and policy makers to discuss and select the most appropriate and cost-effective practices for particular farming systems, soils and climates. SmartSOIL will engage key stakeholders in case study regions and the wider EU in the development of the DST, guidelines and policy recommendations, and will inform the scientific and user community on progress and results.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH-2009-3.3.2. | Award Amount: 3.44M | Year: 2010

RELIGARE starts from the idea of equality and how it is challenged by the increasing diversity of religions and other convictions that are transforming Europe. The EUs expansion, together with important migration fluxes, partly explains this increasing diversity. A growing number of citizens, many of whom are new EU citizens, now hold beliefs and values different from the majority. One observes that individuals and groups today are claiming recognition of their (religious) identity in their family life, their work place, the public space, and the ways States provide support to religious and other groupings. These claims sometimes question and disturb the existing models of secularism in Europe. Public authorities thus face demanding challenges, probably more than ever before, of establishing social cohesion. RELIGAREs overarching goals are: 1) to encourage a critical debate between on the one hand secular assumptions that form part of Europes legacy, including their normative frameworks (existing legal regimes), and on the other hand the practical realities (coping mechanisms and empirically grounded observations); 2) to identify, analyse and evaluate the processes which should eventually lead to adequate policy responses and, where necessary, revision of legislation. RELIGAREs research will: 1) examine the way religious diversity and pluralism are treated in Member States; 2) ascertain deficits and explore the potentials of more appropriate practices, case law, expert and target group inputs (primary sources) and academic literature; 3) advance policy recommendations to address current and future dilemmas in protecting religious diversity and pluralism, considering the role of the EU. The consortium unites academic experts from 13 research units from 9 Member States and Turkey. They are supported by an advisory board of eminent persons connected to policymaking, legislative work and the judiciary in the field of religious diversity and pluralism.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: NoE | Phase: SEC-2011.7.4-1 | Award Amount: 8.18M | Year: 2012

The EUROFORGEN-NoE proposal aims to develop a network of excellence for the creation of a European Virtual Centre of Forensic Genetic Research. Forensic genetics is a highly innovative field of applied science with a strong impact on the security of citizens. However, the genetic methods to identify offenders as well as the creation of national DNA databases have caused concerns to the possible violation of privacy rights. Furthermore, studies to assess the societal dimension of security following the implementation of even more intrusive methods such as the genetic prediction of externally visible characteristics are highly relevant for their public acceptance. The network includes some of the leading groups in European forensic genetic research. It aims to create a closer integration of existing collaborations, as well as establishing new interactions in the field of security, as all key players are addressed: scientists, stakeholders, end-users, educational centres and scientific societies. Only if a long-term collaborative network can be established it will become possible to connect all scientific groups active in the field of forensic genetics, and to initiate a sustained effort covering all aspects of research. These efforts have to be combined with identifying and selecting the most innovative ideas to meet the challenges of analyzing biological crime scene samples compromised by degradation or indentified as mixtures of traces from multiple human sources. The proposal integrates five working packages. WP 1 is devoted to management and coordination. WP 2 will lead the activities aimed at the creation of the virtual centre of research. WP 3 will carry out exemplar projects as models of collaboration and integration of cutting edge research, later complemented by a competitive call for new research projects. The societal dimension of security as well as the ethical and legal aspects wil be addressed in WP 4, whereas WP 5 is devoted to education and training.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN | Award Amount: 3.47M | Year: 2013

Non-coding RNA (ncRNA) is a new research field in rapid development. It holds the potential to explain many fundamental biological phenomena and there is a vast prospective for the development of ncRNA-derived diagnostic and therapeutic tools. Hence, biotech and pharmaceutical companies are actively looking into this unexplored territory for novel targets. Therefore, there is a substantial and unmet need for the training of scientists in ncRNA biology, methodology and exploitation. The regions encompassing protein coding potential (exons) in humans only amount to 2% of the genome. New sequencing techniques have evidenced that mammalian genomes are pervasively transcribed and have revealed the existence of multiple classes of ncRNAs. Although our knowledge on the multitude of transcripts produced by the non-coding 98% of the genome is still very sketchy, pivotal roles have been established for ncRNAs in organismal development and homeostasis, in cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis and in a broad range of human pathologies. Hence, there is a need to educate young scientists in this emerging and important research field. Aside from increasing our collective understanding of essential biological phenomena, ncRNA also constitute a vast and largely unexplored territory for the development of novel therapeutics and diagnostics. Accordingly, we propose to form a European RNA training network, RNATRAIN. This network will be devoted to educating the next generation of European researchers focusing on the functions and importance of ncRNAs in multidisciplinary projects in which the ncRNAs are studied in the context of development, differentiation and disease. Towards this, a group of 9 top-quality European research laboratories and 3 companies from 8 countries will train, to the best level, a cohort of early-stage researchers using cutting-edge technologies to dissect the functions and potentials of ncRNAs through integrated multidisciplinary projects.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2010-ITN | Award Amount: 3.43M | Year: 2011

Cornucopia will train a new generation of young scientists focusing on less studied yeasts with interesting traits, which could be applied in the food and health sectors. Yeasts are a divergent group of fungi that predominantly exist as unicellular organisms. The bakers yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is by far the best known because of its role in producing beverages, baking and recombinant drugs, such as insulin. S. cerevisiae is also the main model for the analysis of common features of all eukaryotic cells, and has been used in pioneering the development of several molecular biology, genomics and post-genomic tools. However, the yeast kingdom includes more than 1.500 other species that display a variety of unusual characteristics, and play an important role in their natural environments, but have so far been only poorly studied. These yeasts represent a large untapped potential to develop novel food and health related processes and products. We will make use of thousands strains available within Cornucopia to screen, using a variety of microbiological, analytical chemistry and bioinformatics techniques, for traits of interest to industry. such as ethanol-, acid- and osmo-tolerance, aromatic and off-flavor compounds and probiotic properties. Our young researchers will develop novel species-specific molecular, genetic and post-genomic tools to find out which genes determine the superior traits. They will domesticate new isolates so that they can be easily handled in the lab, and develop scale-up cultivations for applied purposes. We will benefit from yeast biodiversity and open new avenues within fundamental and applied research. Cornucopia, consists of seven leading yeast academic laboratories and three leading European industry partners, will provide a unique environment to develop strong academia and industry oriented careers, in-depth training in major experimental technologies used in yeast research and the industrial application of innovative ideas.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: ENV.2010.2.1.1-2 | Award Amount: 9.06M | Year: 2010

VOLANTE aims to develop a new European land management paradigm, providing an integrated conceptual and operational platform which allows policy makers to develop pro-active and context-sensitive solutions to the challenges for the future, rather than to react on largely autonomous external land systems developments. Objective of VOLANTE is to provide European policy and land management with critical pathways defining the band width of possible land management policies for future European land use. Policy options will therefore be identified in time and space and their consequences in terms of states of the land system (provisioning of ecosystem goods and services) will be evaluated, leading to a ROADMAP FOR FUTURE LAND RESOURCES MANAGEMENT IN EUROPE. To realise this, VOLANTE is designed in three Modules to gain better understanding of the PROCESSES underpinning land use change in Europe, to exploit ASSESSMENT tools that are capable of identifying critical pathways for land management in a variety of environmental and management regimes across Europe, and to provide insight into the role of land management decisions on future sustainability: VISIONS. VOLANTE brings together researchers with experience and expertise on land use change at various spatial and temporal scales enabling a focus on vision development. Module Processes identifies land use change and the processes causing these, testing unproven hypotheses by extensively using the experience gained in earlier projects and studying crucial missing links. Problem orientation is the basis for the Module Assessment, which will narrow down the infinite spectrum of policy decisions possible. Module Visions establishes interaction with decision makers at regional and European level, to enhance an evidence based and problem oriented science-policy interface. A special, professional and consistent effort will be made to gather the views of a broad set of stakeholders and to include them in all steps of the process.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INFRADEV-4-2014-2015 | Award Amount: 12.08M | Year: 2015

Todays society is being transformed by new materials and processes. Analytical techniques underpin their development and neutrons, with their unique properties, play a pivotal role in a multi-disciplinary, knowledge-based approach. Industry and the neutron research community must however work together more closely to enhance their innovation potential. Neutrons are only available at large scale facilities (LSFs), presenting specific challenges for outreach. National and European initiatives have combined to create a user community of almost 10000, mainly academia-based users, which is supported by an ecosystem of about 10, often world-class national facilities and the European facility, the Institute Laue Langevin. Europe leads neutron science and is investing almost 2B in the European Spallation Source (ESS), its construction, like Horizon 2020, spanning the period 2014-2020. SINE2020, world-class Science and Innovation with Neutrons in Europe in 2020, is therefore a project with two objectives; preparing Europe for the unique opportunities at ESS in 2020 and developing the innovation potential of neutron LSFs. Common services underpin the European research area for neutrons. New and improved services will be developed in SINE2020, by the LSFs and partners in 13 countries, in a holistic approach including outreach, samples, instrumentation and software. These services are the key to integrating ESS in the European neutron ecosystem, ensuring scientific success from day one. They are also the basis for facilitating direct use of neutron LSFs by industry. Particular emphasis is placed on the industry consultancy, which will reach out to industry and develop a business model for direct, industry use of LSFs in 2020, and data treatment, exploiting a game-changing opportunity at LSFs to adopt a common software approach in the production of scientific results.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2012.3.5-01 | Award Amount: 12.44M | Year: 2013

KillSpill delivers innovative (bio)technologies, which can be integrated to the real sequences of state-of-the-art actions used currently to cleanup oil spills. The catalogue of KillSpill products & technologies is based on a review of technology & knowledge gaps in approaches of oil spill disasters and brings appropriate tools for 1st response, follow-up, and longer-term actions, specifically tailored to the versatility of oil spills. KillSpill develops chemicals & biochemicals to be used for 1st response actions to disperse/emulsify oil and materials enabling the containment and sorption of oil, preparing the field for the follow-up actions. KillSpill develops (Bio)technologies aiming at intensified biodegradation processes by bioaugmentation/biostimulation as follow-up and longer term actions in aerobic/slight anoxic compartments. KillSpill develops (bio)technologies adapted for the remediation of anoxic/anaerobic fresh & chronically polluted sediments. KillSpill compiles knowledge on dispersion/sorption and biodegradation processes to produce multifunctional products, which are suited for follow-up and longer term actions. The multifunctional products address the necessity for integrated bioremediation (bioavailability, metabolic requirements, etc.) and are efficient along the whole redox gradient from surface water to sediments. The products/technologies are field-tested in open sea oil spills and large mesocosms to unravel the champions products & technologies. The (bio)tools are benchmarked with existing solutions using cutting-edge analytics, biosensors, and omics and checked for eco-efficiency to merit green label. KillSpill consortium is multidisciplinary and gathers 33 partners from 12 EU and EU-associated countries and USA; 18 research & academic institutions, 14 SMEs, and 1 association of oil spill companies work together with the support of a high level advisory board to cover the whole chain of oil spill (bio)remediation.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 3.99M | Year: 2016

Breast and ovarian cancer constitute serious health challenges in the EU. To identify new improved cancer therapeutic approaches, we will pursue a multi-facetted synthetic lethal approach, which takes advantage of the inherent genetic instability of cancer cells. Most mutations acquired by cancer cells do not cause lethality, but the very same mutations may cause cell death when a second gene in a redundant pathway is inactivated. Thus, targeting a gene that is synthetic lethal together with a cancer-specific mutation will kill only cancer cells while sparing normal cells. Synthetic lethal approaches have been clinically pioneered by members of our consortium, by combining cancer-promoting mutations (e.g. in BRCA2) with inactivating combinations of DNA repair genes. We will use this approach as the scientific frame for our ETN (SYNTRAIN) consisting of 9 academic and 1 SME beneficiary as well as 3 partners. We aim to identify synthetic lethal interactions and exploit them to innovate future breast and ovarian cancer treatments through compound screening and development. SYNTRAIN consists of World leading researchers with complementary knowledge in genome maintenance and stress response pathways, and a critical mass of expertise for providing an excellent training in screening methodologies, mechanistic investigations, and drug discovery. We will offer a structured training program that exceeds the capacities of each individual member. We will educate a future generation of cancer researchers with a high innovative capacity and skills that enhances their career prospects in both academia and industry. Our aims are to train young researchers: i) in techniques preparing for a career in cancer research, ii) in complementary skills relevant for work in academia and the pharma industry and iii) to become creative and entrepreneurial, capable of bridging the gap between basic and applied research.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: BSG-SME-AG | Phase: SME-2 | Award Amount: 4.02M | Year: 2010

The problem and AirPath solution This project targets a large group of SMEs with a shared need. In Europe there are more than 50,000 broiler breeders who are facing a major problem concerning control of air- and insect-borne pathogens in their broiler houses, which results in high infection rates of the broiler flocks. This is partly caused by insects especially flies entering the broiler house through the ventilation system. The Airpath project seeks to solve this problem by developing a new type of barrier based on electrostatic precipitation. This is a known technology used in larger applications where cost is not a major concern such as chimneys on power plants. Hence, the technology must be further developed, scaled and adapted to the specific needs of the European broiler industry. Background of the project The project seeks to solve one of the major challenges that the poultry sector is facing concerning airborne pathogens. An example is Campylobacter which is a major problem in broiler houses (and in the consumer product). At certain times of the year (the warmer months) the breeders experience a rise of infection to more than 60-80% of the flocks. A previous study by DTU Veterinary Institute in Denmark has demonstrated that a major source of the infections is flies entering the houses through the ventilation system. DTU has demonstrated that by effectively keeping the flies out of the broiler houses, the number of infected populations will be drastically reduced. Using simple fly screens it was possible to reduce the infection rate to 15% of the flocs in the problematic period, whereas control populations not using screens showed more 50% infection rate.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: KBBE.2010.4-01 | Award Amount: 1.12M | Year: 2011

The proposed project ECNIS2 aims at continuing the integrative and coordinative works initiated during ECNIS network with an ultimate goal of transforming network into a virtual centre, the European Centre for Research and Education on Cancer, Environment and Food (ECRECEF). ECNIS has already laid foundations for the development of the centre by bringing together researchers from different disciplines (epidemiology, chemical analysis, genetics, molecular biology, nutrition, exposure assessment, risk assessment, harmonisation and standardisation of methodologies and analytical techniques). The initiatives undertaken within ECNIS will be continued during ECNIS2 and will focus on the main pillars, so called ECNIS added values including: Molecular Epidemiology and Cancer (MEC) database, Core facilities for: standardized chemicals, antibodies and analytical methodology, European Standards Committee on Urinary DNA Lesion Analysis (ESCULA), and European Comet Assay Validation Group (ECVAG), ECNIS Repository, and Training and educational program. The works of as many as 21 ECNIS2 partner institutions from 13 countries (incl. 4 SMEs) will be organized within the framework of nine workpackages, five Infrastructural (WP1-ECNIS Centre establishment; WP2-Validation and Standardization; WP3 MEC database; WP4 Spreading of Knowledge; WP5- Education and training), three Thematic (WP6 - Biomarkers use for cancer prevention; WP7 - Dietary exposure and cancer risk as modified by genetic polymorphisms; WP8- Ethics, Communication and Gender) and Managerial WP9. Research coordination, education and dissemination will be key outputs, together with the formulation of strategy for transformation of ECNIS into the Centre (ECRECEF). ECNIS2 will facilitate the transformation of a dynamic European consortium into a durable structure of the co-ordinating centre.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 4.00M | Year: 2017

Nanowires (NWs) exhibit unique properties that make them potential building blocks for a variety of next generation NanoElectronics devices. Recent advances have shown that NWs with predefined properties can be grown, offering a new paradigm enabling functional device prototypes including: biosensors, solar cells, transistors, quantum light sources and lasers. The critical mass of scientific knowledge gained now needs to be translated into NW technologies for industry. FP7-MC NanoEmbrace (ITN) and FUNPROB (IRSES), made substantial contributions to NW research, producing excellent scientific and technological results (>100 journal papers published) and delivered outstanding training in nanoscience and transferable skills to ESRs. Despite demonstrable scientific and technological advantages of NWs, NW-based technology concepts have not yet been translated into market-ready products, because industry and academia have not worked hand-in-hand to commercialize the research findings. Thus, it is essential that NW research is now directed towards customer-oriented scientific R&D; whilst applying innovative industrial design techniques to ensure rapid translation of the basic technologies into commercial devices. This ambitious challenge requires close collaboration between academia and the nascent NW industry, combining the efforts of scientists and engineers to address market needs. Building upon our previous achievements, a team of leading scientific experts from top institutions in Europe, strengthened by experts in innovative design and industrial partners with an excellent track record of converting cutting edge scientific ideas into market products has formed the INDEED network to address this challenge. To enhance employability, INDEED will train young ESRs to become experts with a unique skill set that includes interdisciplinary scientific techniques, industrial experience through R&D secondments and innovative design skills.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 3.87M | Year: 2017

The ENIGMA network will train a new generation of young researchers in the development of innovative sensors, field survey techniques and inverse modelling approaches. This will enhance our ability to understand and monitor dynamic subsurface processes that are key to the protection and sustainable use of water resources. ENIGMA focuses mainly on critical zone observation, but the anticipated technological developments and scientific findings will also contribute to monitor and model the environmental footprint of an increasing range of subsurface activities, including large-scale water abstraction and storage, enhanced geothermal systems and subsurface waste and carbon storage. While many subsurface structure imaging methods are now mature and broadly used in research and practice, our ability to resolve and monitor subsurface fluxes and processes, including solute transport, heat transfer and biochemical reactions, is much more limited. The shift from classical structure characterization to dynamic process imaging, driven by ENIGMA, will require the development of multi-scale hydrogeophysical methods with adequate sensitivity, spatial and temporal resolution, and novel inverse modelling concepts. For this, ENIGMA will gather (i) world-leading academic teams and emerging companies that develop innovative sensors and hydrogeophysical inversion methods, (ii) experts in subsurface process upscaling and modelling, and (iii) highly instrumented field infrastructures for in-situ experimentation and validation. ENIGMA will thus create a creative and entrepreneurial environment for trainees to develop integrated approaches to water management with interdisciplinary field-sensing methods and novel modelling techniques. ENIGMA will foster EU and international cooperation in the water area by creating new links between hydrogeological observatories, academic research groups, innovative industries and water managers for high-level scientific and professional training.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH-2009-5.1.1. | Award Amount: 3.31M | Year: 2010

Free and independent media are vital for the workings of democratic systems. Media structures which are free of interference from government, business or other social groups, and in which access of diverse views and opinions is effectively guaranteed, support democratic debate and sustain citizens active involvement in political and civic life. Given the strong interconnection between politics, business and the media, the creation and safeguarding of an environment supportive of media freedom and independence remain everywhere in Europe a continuous and open-ended process. In view of the important role the media play in providing information about the economy and political affairs, political and economic actors, but also socio-cultural elites regularly seek to exert an influence on domestic media policy-making. MEDIADEM seeks to understand and explain the factors that promote (or conversely hinder) the development of policies for free and independent media. The project will combine a country-based study in Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Greece, Italy, Romania, Slovakia, Spain, Turkey and the UK with a comparative analysis across media sectors and types of media services, and will investigate the complex array of policy approaches and regulatory and self-regulatory practices established to safeguard media freedom and independence. In order to verify whether regulatory measures actually advance a more democratic political order through the diversification of media outlets, sources and content, the project will place them in their proper socio-political, economic and cultural context, and will examine how state and non-state perceptions about the role the media should play in contemporary society influence the implementation of the norms enacted. External pressures stemming from the action of regional organisations, such as the Council of Europe and the EU, will also be investigated in detail. The central assumption of MEDIADEM is that economic, socio-political and cultural domestic peculiarities greatly affect how legal norms are interpreted and implemented, how they are perceived and received, and whether they are truly respected. Simultaneously, given the substantial changes brought by new technologies regarding the way citizens obtain information, the project will examine the opportunities and challenges posed by new media services for media freedom and independence. The project will make a significant contribution to media policy development by advancing knowledge on how media freedom and independence can be safeguarded in Europe. It will thus be of particular interest to state and European policy makers, civil society and the public at large.


Patent
Leo Pharma A S, Copenhagen University, Rigshospitalet and Gentofte Hospital | Date: 2012-07-13

The present invention relates to the field of cancer-diagnostics. In particular the invention relates to a microRNA expression signature that allows discriminating skin samples of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) from non-malignant (inflammantory) skin samples by use of quantitative polymerase chain reaction performed on reverse transcribed miRNA. miR-155, miR-326, miR-663b, miR-203 and miR-205 are shown to be differentially expressed.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: KBBE.2011.1.4-07 | Award Amount: 1.06M | Year: 2012

Aquaculture is widely considered as important for enhancing food security, alleviating poverty and improving nutrition. However, little information is available concerning the direct and indirect impacts of aquaculture on food security and poverty alleviation in most developing countries and LIFDCs. Strengthening the knowledge base surrounding aquaculture and food and nutrition security through this project will provide the evidence upon which sound resource allocation and strategies can be based, and subsequently plan, implement and coordinate efficiently development and research programmes supporting the sustainable expansion of aquaculture and increasing its impact to food security and poverty alleviation. The project is to be implemented by 18 partners in 11 selected LIFDCs, 3 EU partners, and 3 international organizations. The project will strengthen the knowledge base on food security and poverty and develop new methodologies or more rigorous methodologies to quantify the contribution of aquaculture in combating hunger and poverty in developing countries and LIFDCs. This will endeavour to better understand aquacultures contribution to human development. Project partner countries were selected based on varied human development conditions and national level efforts in including aquaculture for improving national food security and alleviating poverty. They represent all major aquaculture regions and ICPCs where aquaculture has major contributions to national economy involve high numbers of small-scale aquaculture farms, and with high international trade of fish and fishery products. The results of the project will be brought to the attention of countries and development partners, particularly the EU, and outputs will help LIFDCs and various development partners to improve efficiency and coordination in development initiatives focused on aquaculture as a means of promoting food security and poverty alleviation.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SFS-09-2014 | Award Amount: 5.55M | Year: 2015

The European Union has committed to the gradual elimination of discarding. DiscardLess will help provide the knowledge, tools and technologies as well as the involvement of the stakeholders to achieve this. These will be integrated into Discard Mitigation Strategies (DMS) proposing cost-effective solutions at all stages of the seafood supply chain. The first focus is on preventing the unwanted catches from ever being caught. This will promote changes in gear using existing and innovative selectivity technology, and changes in fishing tactics based on fishers and scientists knowledge. The second focus is on making best use of the unavoidable unwanted catch. We will detail technical and marketing innovations from the deck, through the supply chain to the final market, including monitoring, traceability and valorization components. DiscardLess will evaluate the impacts of discarding on the marine environment, on the economy, and across the wider society. We will evaluate these impacts before, during and after the implementation of the landing obligation, allowing comparison between intentions and outcomes. Eliminating discards is as much a societal challenge as a fishery management one, so we will also evaluate stakeholders perception of discards. DiscardLess will describe the changes in management and the associated governance structures needed to cement the process. We will propose approaches to managing discards in a range of case study fisheries across Europe, encompassing differences in specific discarding issues. All these innovations will be combined in integrated Internet based interactive programs (DMS toolbox) that will help fishers to evaluate the present and future situation and to take a more qualified decision of how to adjust to the new regime. Also, we will disseminate the outcome of the project and maximize knowledge transfer across Europe through an educational environment teaching the next generation as well as more conventional routes.


Palmgren M.G.,Copenhagen University | Nissen P.,University of Aarhus
Annual Review of Biophysics | Year: 2011

P-type ATPases form a large superfamily of cation and lipid pumps. They are remarkably simple with only a single catalytic subunit and carry out large domain motions during transport. The atomic structure of P-type ATPases in different conformations, together with ample mutagenesis evidence, has provided detailed insights into the pumping mechanism by these biological nanomachines. Phylogenetically, P-type ATPases are divided into five subfamilies, P1P5. These subfamilies differ with respect to transported ligands and the way they are regulated. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.


Gleadow R.M.,Monash University | Moller B.L.,Copenhagen University | Moller B.L.,Carlsberg Laboratory
Annual Review of Plant Biology | Year: 2014

Cyanogenic glycosides (CNglcs) are bioactive plant products derived from amino acids. Structurally, these specialized plant compounds are characterized as α-hydroxynitriles (cyanohydrins) that are stabilized by glucosylation. In recent years, improved tools within analytical chemistry have greatly increased the number of known CNglcs by enabling the discovery of less abundant CNglcs formed by additional hydroxylation, glycosylation, and acylation reactions. Cyanogenesis - the release of toxic hydrogen cyanide from endogenous CNglcs - is an effective defense against generalist herbivores but less effective against fungal pathogens. In the course of evolution, CNglcs have acquired additional roles to improve plant plasticity, i.e., establishment, robustness, and viability in response to environmental challenges. CNglc concentration is usually higher in young plants, when nitrogen is in ready supply, or when growth is constrained by nonoptimal growth conditions. Efforts are under way to engineer CNglcs into some crops as a pest control measure, whereas in other crops efforts are directed toward their removal to improve food safety. Given that many food crops are cyanogenic, it is important to understand the molecular mechanisms regulating cyanogenesis so that the impact of future environmental challenges can be anticipated. Copyright © 2014 by Annual Reviews.


Lykke-Andersen S.,University of Aarhus | Lykke-Andersen S.,Copenhagen University
Genes & development | Year: 2014

Eukaryotic RNAs with premature termination codons (PTCs) are eliminated by nonsense-mediated decay (NMD). While human nonsense RNA degradation can be initiated either by an endonucleolytic cleavage event near the PTC or through decapping, the individual contribution of these activities on endogenous substrates has remained unresolved. Here we used concurrent transcriptome-wide identification of NMD substrates and their 5'-3' decay intermediates to establish that SMG6-catalyzed endonucleolysis widely initiates the degradation of human nonsense RNAs, whereas decapping is used to a lesser extent. We also show that a large proportion of genes hosting snoRNAs in their introns produce considerable amounts of NMD-sensitive splice variants, indicating that these RNAs are merely by-products of a primary snoRNA production process. Additionally, transcripts from genes encoding multiple snoRNAs often yield alternative transcript isoforms that allow for differential expression of individual coencoded snoRNAs. Based on our findings, we hypothesize that snoRNA host genes need to be highly transcribed to accommodate high levels of snoRNA production and that the expression of individual snoRNAs and their cognate spliced RNA can be uncoupled via alternative splicing and NMD. © 2014 Lykke-Andersen et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.


Park S.,Yonsei University | Gildersleeve J.C.,U.S. National Cancer Institute | Blixt O.,Copenhagen University | Shin I.,Yonsei University
Chemical Society Reviews | Year: 2013

In the last decade, carbohydrate microarrays have been core technologies for analyzing carbohydrate-mediated recognition events in a high-throughput fashion. A number of methods have been exploited for immobilizing glycans on the solid surface in a microarray format. This microarray-based technology has been widely employed for rapid analysis of the glycan binding properties of lectins and antibodies, the quantitative measurements of glycan-protein interactions, detection of cells and pathogens, identification of disease-related anti-glycan antibodies for diagnosis, and fast assessment of substrate specificities of glycosyltransferases. This review covers the construction of carbohydrate microarrays, detection methods of carbohydrate microarrays and their applications in biological and biomedical research. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra-PP | Phase: INFRA-2010-2.2.2;INFRA-2010-2.2.4 | Award Amount: 6.34M | Year: 2010

To understand the complex Earth System requires an integrated observational strategy and infrastructure to record key diagnostic features of its dynamics. Accordingly, this infrastructure must include geographically distributed and multidisciplinary monitoring instruments and observations. The European Plate Observing System (EPOS) will meet this challenge. The proposed RI (EPOS) will create a single sustainable, permanent and distributed infrastructure, integrating land-based geophysical monitoring networks, local observatories (including permanent in-situ and volcano observatories) and experimental laboratories in Europe. EPOS will give open access to geophysical and geological data and modelling tools, enabling a step change in multidisciplinary scientific research into different fields, including seismic and volcanic hazards, environmental changes as well as energy and long-term sustainability. This will result in benefits to society. Presently, the different European countries own a mosaic of hundreds of impressive, but separated networks, observatories, temporary deployments, labs and modelling facilities, etc... for solid earth studies. Long-term sustainability of plate observations, optimising access to, and combining a wide variety of solid Earth data and modelling tools are prerequisites to innovative research for a better understanding of the physical processes controlling earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and other catastrophic events (landslides, tsunamis) together with those controlling Earth surface dynamics (crustal response to deformation and to global change). EPOS will enable the scientific community to study the same phenomena from a multidisciplinary point of view, at different temporal and spatial scales (from laboratory to field and plate tectonic scale experiments). EPOS intends to create the prerequisites for Europe to maintain a leading role in solid Earth science research.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.8.2 | Award Amount: 6.51M | Year: 2010

Quantum entanglement has the capacity to enable disruptive technologies that solve outstanding issues in: - Trust, privacy protection, and security in two- and multi-party transactions; - Novel or enhanced modes of operation of ICT devices; - Reference standards, sensing, and metrology. The development of entanglement-based strategies addresses these challenges and provides the foundations for quantum technologies of the 21st century. The practical exploitation of entanglement requires groundbreaking levels of robustness and flexibility for deployment in real-world environments. This ambitious goal can be reached only through radically new designs of protocols, architectures, interfaces, and components. Q-ESSENCE will achieve this by a concerted application-driven effort covering relevant experimental, phenomenological, and fundamental aspects. Our consortium will target three main outcomes: 1) Development of entanglement-enabled and entanglement-enhanced ICT devices: atomic clocks, quantum sensors, and quantum random-number generators; 2) Novel physical-layer architectures for long-distance quantum communication that surpass current distance limitations through the deployment of next-generation components; 3) Distributed quantum information protocols that provide disruptive solutions to multiuser trust, privacy-protection, and security scenarios based on multipartite entanglement. These outcomes will be reached through the underpinning science and enabling technologies of: light-matter interfaces providing faithful interconversion between different physical realizations of qubits; entanglement engineering at new scales and distances; robust architectures protecting quantum information from decoherence; quantum information concepts that solve problems of limited trust and privacy intrusion. The project builds on the outstanding expertise of the consortium demonstrated by pioneering works over the past decades, enhanced by a strong industrial perspective.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE-2007-1-2-15 | Award Amount: 9.60M | Year: 2009

The MAIN AIM of the proposed integrating project NUE-CROPS is to develop knowledge, models and tools required to (a) breed/select NUTRIENT USE EFFICIENT (NUE) CROPS and (b) integrate NUE-crops with AGRONOMIC INNOVATIONS to significantly reduce fertiliser use and associated negative environmental impacts of crop production, while maintaining or improving crop yield and quality. The consortium includes 10 academic centres of excellence and 3 large breeding companies in 6 EU member states, China (an ICPC region) and the USA. The strategic CONCEPTS/OBJECTIVES of NUE-CROPS are to support the: 1. DEVELOPMENT OF NUE-VARIETIES of 4 MAJOR EUROPEAN CROPS (wheat, oilseed rape, potato, maize) for different MACROCLIMATIC REGIONS. This will be based on (a) classical QTL identification methods, (b) association genetics approaches, (c) gene expression profiling (and where appropriate proteomic, metabolomic analyses and/or analytical transformation analyses) and (d) whole plant physiological studies. R&D activities will focus on the 4 major crops species, but deliverables from studies with model plants/crops (Arabidopsis, Brassica rapa, barley) will be used as genetic bridges for the genetically complex crops wheat and oilseed rape. 2. INTEGRATION of NUE-CROPS with INNOVATIVE MANAGEMENT approaches (e.g. improved fertilisation regimes, rotational designs, winter cover crop use and, tillage systems). This will be based on: (a) field experiments to evaluate the impact of NUE crops under contrasting agronomic scenarios and (b) the construction/validation of models/algorithms for nutrient budgeting/precision farming systems 3. To ESTABLISH an EFFICIENT TRAINING and DISSEMINATION programme aimed at rapid exploitation and application of project deliverables in commercial crop production.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: GERI-1-2014 | Award Amount: 1.57M | Year: 2015

Hypatia will bring about lasting change in the way schools, science museums, research institutions and industry engage teenage girls in STEM across Europe. Bringing these stakeholders together with gender experts and teenagers themselves, Hypatia will develop, pilot and disseminate a unique modular toolkit of activities and guidelines for engaging teenagers in STEM in a gender-inclusive way. These innovative activities, based on existing European good practices, will be implemented in 14 EU countries and further afield, in schools, science museums and by institutions in research and industry, thanks to hubs of stakeholders strengthened through the project. The activities will have a central focus on gender-inclusive ways of communicating STEM, empowering teenage girls and exploring the range of skills that are needed for the great variety of STEM studies and careers open to young people. The Hypatia hubs will provide a sustainable basis for these activities to be carried out on the long term, with a focus on dissemination through networks and stakeholder engagement allowing the project impact to multiply.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.74M | Year: 2016

PDZnet will create an innovative European PhD training network focusing on unraveling PDZ domain-mediated signaling networks. The emphasis will be on signaling nodes essential for the development of cancer and diseases of the nervous system, conditions that affect millions of Europeans and are major societal challenges. PDZ domains are protein and lipid recognizing modules that play a central role in trafficking and organizing diverse cell signaling assemblies, thereby allowing information to be transmitted from receptors, ion channels and transporters in the cell membrane. PDZ domain mediated interactions are emerging as conceptually novel and promising drug targets, with exciting opportunities for the development of novel therapies, especially within cancer and brain diseases. We will establish a European multidisciplinary platform integrating a plethora of complementary life science disciplines that range from chemical development of inhibitors to studies in live animals. The network encompasses 8 academic and 2 industrial beneficiaries as well as one industrial and one academic partner, which are all committed to promote frontline research, innovation and educational activities within the study of PDZ domain-mediated signal transduction pathways related to brain diseases and cancer. This interdisciplinary network will establish an outstanding training opportunity for Early Stage Researchers, who will be integrated in projects unraveling intracellular PDZ domain interactomes to provide pertinent information for discovering drug-related interactions. In a comprehensive and integrated training effort, involving a combination of scientific and transferable skills, the students will receive an interdisciplinary, intersectoral and innovative doctoral training from experienced industrial and academic leaders in well-reputed European Institutions.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 2.14M | Year: 2017

The overall objective of Glyco Imaging is to develop novel assays for detection of glycans as biomarkers associated with aggressive and metastatic cancer forms. The assays will be developed for biomarker detection in blood, urine, cells and tissue. Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIPs), or plastic antibodies, have been developed for targeting the human glycan sialic acid (SA), or Neu5Ac. The efficiency of the Neu5Ac specific SAMIPs targeted to the biomarker SA in different solvents (methanol, water, phosphate buffer) will be exploited. The non-human Neu5Gc, which is incorporated into human glycoconjugates through dietary sources such as red meat, and shown to be involved in malignant cell transformation in humans, will also be investigated by using highly specific Neu5Gc-SAMIPs. The imaging and detection techniques used will be based on fluorescence, 3D-viewing of cancer cells by digital holographic microscopy and magnetic separation columns. The results in this research consortium will lead to major technological advances having impact on 1) health care, since it will develop more accurate and reliable diagnostics of aggressive and metastatic cancers, 2) drug discovery allowing a faster and cheaper biomarker targeting and detection; and 3) biochemistry research laboratories in resulting in improved understanding of glycan expression in cancer, with emphasis on aggressive metastatic cancer. The training of researchers will be performed by a consortium consisting of 6 partners with biomedical, imaging and particle synthesis skills (4 groups, one institution, one technology company). This forms the basis for a very competent interdisciplinary training program with high quality in both education and research. 8 early stage researchers (ESRs) working on specific tasks within 5 work packages will follow a rich training program providing a well-balanced spectrum of scientific, business and entrepreneurial skills.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: FETPROACT-01-2016 | Award Amount: 10.00M | Year: 2017

The hybrid optomechanical technologies (HOT) consortium will lay the foundation for a new generation of devices, which connect, or indeed contain, several platforms at the nanoscale in a single hybrid system. As hybrid interfaces they will allow to harness the unique advantages of each subsystem within a nano-scale footprint, while as integrated hybrid devices they will enable entirely novel functionalities. A particular focus will be on nano-optomechanical devices that comprise electrical, microwave or optical systems with micro- and nano-mechanical systems. Research in the past decade, in particular by European groups, has shown the significant technological potential that such nano-optomechanical systems can offer, in particular by establishing a new way in which optical, radio-frequency and microwave signals can be interfaced. The present consortium includes leading academic groups and industrial partners to explore the potential of these hybrid-nano-optomechanical systems. It will explore hybrid opto- and electro-mechanical devices operating at the physical limit for conversion, synthesis, processing, sensing and measurement of EM fields, comprising radio, microwave frequencies to the terahertz domain. These spectral domains open realistic applications in the existing application domains of medical (e.g. MRI imaging), security (e.g. Radar and THz monitoring), positioning, timing and navigations (Oscillators) and for future quantum technology. The research aims at specific technological application, with realistic operating conditions and seeks to develop actual system demonstrators. In addition, it will explore how these hybrid transducers can be fabricated within standard CMOS processing, and thereby be made compatible with current manufacturing methods. The HOT devices will thereby impact todays technology and likewise address potential future need for the manipulation of quantum signals.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: SFS-06-2014 | Award Amount: 1.78M | Year: 2015

PROIntensAfrica intends to develop a proposal for a long term research and innovation partnership between Europe and Africa, focusing on the improvement of the food and nutrition security and the livelihoods of African farmers by exploring and exploiting the diversity of pathways to sustainable intensification of African agro-food systems. The exploration will include environmental, economic and social externalities along the whole value chains. PROIntensAfrica has the ambition to formulate a research and innovation agenda, identifying the domains in need for further research to realize the potential of African food systems. In addition, PROIntensAfrica will suggest governance mechanisms that are effective in supporting the partnership. Key is the perception that pooling resources is the best way to align existing and initiate new research. This perception follows the policy of the EC, where instruments of joint programming like ERA-NET, JPI and article 185 aim to accomplish synergy and increase the effectiveness of resources. Pooling resources goes beyond the scientific domain and reaches into the policy domain. Consequently, besides being rooted in sound and challenging research, a partnership proposal needs to meet national and international policies to fly. Therefore PROIntensAfrica pay specific attention to engage with the policy domain, as exemplified by the intended creation of a policy support group. The rationale of the project is that a variety of pathways leads to sustainable intensification of African food systems. Different pathways are advocated in literature. High-input farming systems, for example, contrast with organic farming systems, each with their own supporters and criticasters. It is the conviction of the PROIntensAfrica consortium that moving beyond that debate will open exciting new pathways, and that combining elements of different systems will yield innovative systems that are optimally adapted to specific contexts.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2010.3.5-1 | Award Amount: 4.98M | Year: 2010

The objective of the DirectFuel project is to develop photosynthetic microorganisms that catalyze direct conversion of solar energy and carbon dioxide to engine-ready fuels. A key process target of the proposal is direct in the sense that fuel production should not require destructive extraction and further chemical conversion to generate directly useable transport fuels. To further increase our chances of delivering a functioning process we target only non-toxic end-products that have been demonstrated to function in existing or minimally modified combustion engines. From the above criteria, we have chosen to develop an exclusively biological production process for the volatile end-products ethylene and short-chain n-alkanes ethane and propane in photosynthetic cyanobacteria. As no natural biochemical pathways are known to exist for short-chain alkane biosynthesis, we first identify potential gene candidates through informatics analysis and then tailor the substrate specificities of the encoded enzymes by enzyme engineering. In order to directly capture solar energy to drive fuel biosynthesis, the synthetic pathways are at first assembled in the photosynthetic model organism Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. It is highly unlikely that mere introduction of novel biochemical pathways will result in high-yield synthesis of desired end-products. The final key step is therefore to optimize native host metabolism to deliver reducing energy and metabolic precursors to the synthetic pathways with maximum metabolic flux. Successful construction of the intended strains would allow low-cost production of transport fuel in a potentially neutral greenhouse gas emitting process that does not compete for agricultural land. The proposed project is highly relevant to the call as we construct new metabolic pathways that catalyze direct production of gaseous fuels for transport directly from solar radiation.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN | Award Amount: 3.24M | Year: 2012

The ReUseWaste network will i) provide new ideas and systems that lead to a major rethink in the current, established animal waste management systems, ii) train a group of 13 young researchers in developing new technologies for socially and environmentally sustainable utilisation of the valuable organic matter and nutrient ressources in animal waste and iii) provide companies with both improved and new technologies to produce bioenergy, green bio-fertilisers and improved soil, water and air quality. Global livestock production is increasing rapidly, because of the increasing quest for animal protein by the increasing human population. Apart from the increases in livestock number, there are also major changes in the systems of livestock production. The increases in number and changes in systems have led to major concerns about the sustainability of these developments, especially from the points of view of animal and human health, animal welfare and environmental soundness. Evidently it is necessary for the agricultural livestock industry to develop new environmental technologies to meet global challenges related to environmental impact and sustainability. The industry needs to improve management and utilisation of organic matter and nutrient resources in animal wastes, in order to reduce gaseous emissions of greenhouse gases, ammonia and odor, and to improve energy output and limit the impact on soil and water quality. This multi-site and multidisciplinary ITN provides a unique opportunity for young researchers to obtain the knowledge and skills needed to develop and utilise new technologies for a socially and environmentally responsible management of animal wastes. The ReUseWaste network brings together major EU research groups from leading universities and research institutes, key agri-environmental technology companies and public authorities, from the countries and regions of most intensive livestock production in Europe.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: NMP-2008-1.3-2 | Award Amount: 5.27M | Year: 2009

Engineered Nanoparticles (ENP) are increasingly produced for use in a wide range of industrial and consumer products. Yet it is known that exposure to some types of particles can cause severe health effects. Therefore it is essential to ascertain whether exposure to ENP can lead to possible health risks for workers and consumers. We have formed a consortium of well-known scientists from European Universities and Research Institutes, with over 100 publications in the field of Nanotoxicology. Our aim is to develop an approach for the Risk Assessment of ENP (ENPRA). Our objectives are: (i) to obtain a bank of commercial ENP with contrasting physico-chemical characteristics and measure them; (ii) to investigate the toxic effects of ENP on 5 (pulmonary, hepatic, renal, cardiovascular and developmental) target systems and 5 endpoints (oxidative stress, inflammation; immuno-toxicity; fibrogenecity; genotoxicity) using in vitro animal/human models; (iii) to validate the in vitro findings with a small set of carefully chosen in vivo animal experiments; (iv) to construct mathematical models to extrapolate the exposure-dose-response relationship from in vitro to in vivo and to humans; (v) to use QSAR like models to identify the key ENP characteristics driving the adverse effects; (vi) to implement a risk assessment of ENP using the Weight-of-Evidence approach; (vii) to disseminate our findings to potential stakeholders. To harmonise the research activities between our EU group and the US, we have established links with scientists from US Universities (Duke, Rochester) and Government Agencies (NIH/NIEHS, NIOSH and EPA) with on-going research in Nanotoxicology. Our objectives here are (vii) to share information and agree on experimental protocols; (viii) to avoid duplication of work; (ix) to further validate the findings of this proposed study.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE-2007-3-1-09 | Award Amount: 8.06M | Year: 2009

Plants sustainably produce low levels of secondary metabolites of high industrial value. However, they are often too complex to be economically manufactured by chemical synthesis. Advanced metabolic engineering and exploitation of plants as Green Factories has been prevented due to poorly understood metabolic pathways in plants and the regulation thereof. SmartCell brings together 14 leading European academic laboratories and four industrial partners in order to create a novel concept for rationally engineering plants towards improved economical production of high-value compounds for non-food industrial use. Although SmartCell focuses on terpenoids, the largest class of secondary metabolites, which exhibit extremely diverse biological and pharmaceutical activities, all knowledge, tools and resources developed in the project, are generic and broadly applicable to engineer any plant biosynthetic pathway. A systems biology approach using metabolomics and transcriptomics is taken to move beyond the state of the art. New multigene transfer technologies are developed. By screening and functionally categorizing genes at structural, regulatory and transport levels a comprehensive knowledge base of how secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways operate in plants is developed. The case study component i.e. manufacturing a valuable terpenoid in an optimized large-scale system gives SmartCell a unique opportunity to directly make transition from fundamental science to application. For long-term exploitation an integrated database, compound library, cell culture collection and a genebank available for academic and industrial communities will be established. SmartCell provides new opportunities for SMEs and established European biotech companies, and the technology can also be transferred to other e.g. fine chemical and pharmaceutical industries. SmartCell will prove that plant-based resources can furnish the European society and industry far more than they presently do.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2008-1.1.1 | Award Amount: 8.04M | Year: 2009

The network INCREASE consists of 6 infrastructures (large-scale field sites) with experimental manipulation of climate e.g night time warming and extended summer drought. Within INCREASE we will improve the technology and methodology for studies of climate change effects on European shrublands. The main objectives of INCREASE are: 1. To optimize technologies and methodologies for non-intrusive field manipulation of climate change in shrubland ecosystems by development, testing and application of new technology and methods i) to optimize the field manipulations of warming to 3-4 C (in agreement with the newest predictions of global warming by the IPCC (2007)), ii) to develop, test and apply the combination of warming and drought and the combination with CO2. 2. To improve and develop non-destructive techniques and methods for measurements of physical, chemical and biological effects of climate. 3. To stimulate collaboration within the scientific community around climate manipulation experiments i) within the infrastructure by means of e.g. common research, common protocols, test of equipment, data syntheses, ii) between the infrastructure and related infrastructures beyond the proposal, and iii) scientists within relevant fields 4. To provide access to a unique set of large scale climate change experiment for European scientists. 5. To develop and provide access to a comprehensive data base of experimental data. 6. To develop and provide access to a dynamic ecosystem model for scrubland ecosystems 7. To test and apply non-destructive methods for ecosystem carbon assessment and important underlying processes of root dynamics and carbon transformations in the soil.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: ENV.2008.3.1.1.1. | Award Amount: 8.58M | Year: 2009

Within the AQUAREHAB project, different innovative rehabilitation technologies for soil, groundwater and surface water will be developed to cope with a number of hazardous (nitrates, pesticides, chlorinated and aromatic compounds, mixed pollutions,) within heavily degraded water systems. The technologies are activated riparian zones/wetlands; smart biomass containing carriers for treatment of water in open trenches; in-situ technologies to restore degraded surface water by inhibiting influx of pollutants from groundwater to surface water; multifunctional permeable barriers and injectable Fe-based particles for rehabilitation of groundwater. Methods will be developed to determine the (long-term) impact of the innovative rehabilitation technologies on the reduction of the influx of these priority pollutants towards the receptor. A connection between the innovative technologies and river basin management will be worked out. In a first stage of the project, the technologies and integration of their impact in river basin management will be developed in three different river basins (Denmark, Israel, Belgium). In a second stage, the generic approaches will be extrapolated to one or two more river basins. One of the major outcomes of the project will be a generic river basin management tool that integrates multiple measures with ecological and economic impact assessments of the whole water system. The research in the project is focussed on innovative rehabilitation strategies to reduce priority pollutants in the water system whereas the generic management tool will include other measures related to flood protection, water scarcity and ecosystem health, The project will aid in underpinning river basin management plans being developed in EU Member States, and will demonstrate cost effective technologies that can provide technical options for national and local water managers, planners and other stakeholders (drinking water companies, industry, agriculture,


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.8.0 | Award Amount: 3.01M | Year: 2011

This project aims at the creation of robust and scalable quantum interfaces between different platforms for the implementation of Quantum Technologies. We will focus on interfacing interaction or measurement induced quantum resources in atomic matter to light fields, based on less demanding alternatives to cavity-enhanced interaction of light with single ultracold atoms. For some applications we even plan to use thermal atoms which allow for a further reduction in the experimental complexity. To this end we want to push the evolution of Quantum Technologies further towards technologically scalable quantum devices. We will realize quantum devices and interfaces based on Rydberg blockaded gases, quantum gases and room temperature gases in microfabricated structures as well as the full theoretical framework for their description. The new expertise emerging from our project will provide a platform for progress in Information and Communication Technology (ICT) towards real-world deployment of quantum repeaters for long-distance quantum communication.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2013.9.1 | Award Amount: 2.99M | Year: 2013

This project aims at the efficient realization of quantum interfaces for high-fidelity conversion and coherent manipulation of quantum states of phonons and of photons at vastly distinct wavelengths. We will consider different experimental platforms, e.g. photonic crystal cavities, nonlinear crystalline resonators, graphene-based nanoelectromechanical systems, and nanomembranes, with the aim of implementing interfaces that are able to interact simultaneously in a tunable way with optical and microwave fields. State transfer and controlled dynamics between radiation modes at completely different frequencies and between photons and phonons will be accomplished using diverse strategies, e.g. by tailoring the coupling of the interface with the fields, by exploiting electromagnetically-induced transparency, or the nonlinearities achievable in the strong coupling regime. The project results will enable new regimes for radio- and microwave electro-magnetic field detection, allowing quantum-limited amplification and readout of microwave and radio-frequency radiation. At the same time solid-state quantum devices which are now mainly manipulated by radiofrequencies and/or microwaves will become efficiently coupled to and controlled by optical fields.

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