Solbjerg, Denmark

Copenhagen Business School

www.cbs.dk
Solbjerg, Denmark

Copenhagen Business School, also known as CBS, is situated in Copenhagen, Denmark. CBS was established in 1917 by Danish Society for the Advancement of Business Education and Research , however, it wasn't until 1920 that accounting became the first full study programme at CBS. Today CBS has more than 20,000 students, 13,000 employees and offers a wide range of undergraduate and graduate programmes within business, typically with an interdisciplinary and international focus. CBS' campus is located in Frederiksberg, close to the center of Copenhagen, and centers on CBS' main campus Solbjerg Plads .Since the Danish Universities Act of 2003, CBS has had a Board of Directors with an external majority. The Board of Directors appoints the President of CBS, who is currently Per Holten-Andersen. Wikipedia.

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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: NMP-18-2014 | Award Amount: 8.93M | Year: 2015

Within Trash-2-Cash, growing problems with paper fibre waste from the paper industry and textile fibre waste, originating from a continuously increasing textile consumption, will be solved through design-driven innovation. This will be performed by using the wastes to regenerate fibres that will be included into fashion, interior and other products. The cotton production suffers from non-sustainable environmental and socio-economical issues and the polyester fibre manufacture produces waste that to date has no viable deposition. Designers will lead the recycling initiative, defining the material properties, and will feed the material scientists to evaluate newly developed eco-efficient cotton fibre regeneration and polyester recycling techniques. The future exploitation will be ascertained through a two-sided exchange between the designers and the end-product manufacturers, also taking into account the consumer-related product needs, and prototypes will be produced in a realistic test production environment. The objectives are to: Integrate design, business and technology to a coherent discipline to establish new creative industries Develop new material and product opportunities via creative design from waste or process by-product Reduce the utilization of virgin materials; improve material efficiency; decrease landfill volumes and energy consumption Use design for recycling with the vision of closing the material loop Create new business opportunities by adding the return loop of the discarded goods to be reused into attractive products Promote development of the creative sector by providing technological solutions for exploitation of waste streams Europes creative industry will be strengthened through Trash-2-Cash taking the lead worldwide in the design for recycled materials area. Moreover, Trash-2-Cash will support a better waste utilization and contribute to reduction of landfill area needs.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: SEC-2013.2.4-1 | Award Amount: 48.35M | Year: 2014

CORE will consolidate, amplify, extend and demonstrate EU knowledge and capabilities and international co-operation for securing supply chains whilst maintaining or improving business performance, with specific reference to key Supply Chain Corridors. CORE will be driven by the requirements of: the Customs, law enforcement authorities, and other agencies nationally and internationally to increase effectiveness of security & trade compliance, without increasing the transaction costs for business and to increase co-operative security risk management (supervision & control); the business communities, specifically shippers, forwarders, terminal operators, carriers and financial stakeholders to integrate compliance and trade facilitation concepts like green lanes and pre-clearance with supply chain visibility and optimisation. CORE will consolidate solutions developed in Reference Projects in each supply chain sector (port, container, air, post). Implementation-driven R&D will be then undertaken designed to discover gaps and practical problems and to develop capabilities and solutions that could deliver sizable and sustainable progress in supply chain security across all EU Member States and on a global scale.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: REV-INEQUAL-08-2016 | Award Amount: 4.99M | Year: 2016

Since 2008 fiscal leaks have become an immediate policy challenge for EU governments, partly as a result of tax abuse. The COFFERS project unfolds as EU tax authorities transition to a new era in tackling tax abuse based upon policy innovation at the OECD, EU and national levels. COFFERS recognizes this creates a state of flux where much tax authority expertise regarding past regulations, systems and practices is now irrelevant and understanding has, instead, to focus upon the on-going change process. Deploying principles of evolutionary political economy COFFERS both studies and is an integral part of this change process. COFFERS recognizes that identifying and tackling the tax gap to relieve inequality is the ultimate aim. Noting the tax gap exists both domestically and internationally and ranges from criminal money laundering to sophisticated tax avoidance, COFFERS benchmarks current understanding of these issues, undertakes comparative analysis of approaches taken to tackle them across EU Member States, and assesses resources being allocated to the task of closing the tax gap. In parallel expert networks in business, the tax profession, secrecy jurisdictions and the criminal economy that develop the mechanisms undermining the expected effectiveness of tax systems will be appraised, especially with regard to responses to regulatory changes taking place. This results in COFFERS outputs that transmit analysis, risk assessment and policy advice. Deliverables of use to EU tax authorities include new tax gap analyses by state, tax risk maps identifying risk by jurisdiction, a new anatomy of money laundering risk, and tools to help tax authorities understand the risks that they face domestically and internationally. COFFERS delivers value for money in enhancing tax yield, effectiveness in creating the tools to achieve that goal, and behavioural change in taxpayers and their advisers as a result of recommendations made, all with the aim of reducing inequality.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INT-04-2015 | Award Amount: 3.72M | Year: 2016

This Project aims to address an increasingly pressing global challenge: How to achieve the EUs development goals and the UNs Sustainable Development Goals, while meeting the global target of staying within two degrees global warming and avoid transgressing other planetary boundaries. EU policies must align with sustainable development goals (Article 11 TFEU). The impacts of climate change and global loss of natural habitat undermine the progress achieved by pursuing the Millennium Development Goals and threaten the realisation of EU development policy goals. Our focus is the role of EUs public and private market actors. They have a high level of interaction with actors in emerging and developing economies, and are therefore crucial to achieving the EUs development goals. However, science does not yet cater for insights in how the regulatory environment influences their decision-making, nor in how we can stimulate them to make development-friendly, environmentally and socially sustainable decisions. Comprehensive, ground-breaking research is necessary into the regulatory complexity in which EU private and public market actors operate, in particular concerning their interactions with private and public actors in developing countries. Our Consortium, leading experts in law, economics, and applied environmental and social science, is able to analyse this regulatory complexity in a transdisciplinary and comprehensive perspective, both on an overarching level and in depth, in the form of specific product life-cycles: ready-made garments and mobile phones. We bring significant new evidence-based insights into the factors that enable or hinder coherence in EU development policy; we will advance the understanding of how development concerns can be successfully integrated in non-development policies and regulations concerning market actors; and we provide tools for improved PCD impact assessment as well as for better corporate sustainability assessment.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: EURO-1-2014 | Award Amount: 2.89M | Year: 2015

Plans for economic and monetary integration in the European Union call for fundamental changes in fiscal relations among EU member states and other countries. The 2012 Blueprint for the European Monetary Union (EMU) calls for deeper integration of fiscal policies at the level of domestic EU members, including establishing EU own-source revenues. The 2013 Social Dimension of the EMU emphasizes that this fiscal revisioning must also improve coordination of employment and social policies post-crisis to counteract declines in state revenues, evaluate fragmented policy initiatives during the crisis, and improve human well-being and capabilities ends in themselves and as preconditions to stable integration and sustainable growth. This project will carry out in-depth comparative, interdisciplinary research using constitutional, legal, technical, institutional, qualitative, and quantitative methods to address four core issues: * Options for expanding EU legislative competences or governance mechanisms for effective harmonization of member tax and social policies; * Reform options for state-level coordination of fairer, more stable, and more sustainable tax and social policy regimes; * Strategies for the increased effectiveness and harmonization of tax administration and compliance structures within the EU and non-EU areas; and * Recommendations for true own-source EU revenues. This project is relevant to fundamental political and structural challenges that face the EU as it pursues deep fiscal integration. Fiscal policies encompass both revenue production and state spending priorities, and have tremendous impact on life choices, business planning, and economic development. Whether under conditions of stable growth or disruption, state revenues remain at the heart of state governance capacities; throughout, the well-being of the population as a whole remains at the heart of social and political stability and productivity.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-35-2016 | Award Amount: 532.88K | Year: 2017

In this project, we propose an in-depth empirical investigation of privacy in the sharing economy. We will investigate three challenges in particular: privacy, participation/exclusion and power. First, sharing services come with compounded privacy risks extending beyond the informational into the physical realm. In addition, online sharing services entail both institutional and social privacy threats. Second, sharing services might exclude certain population segments and increase social inequality by systematically disadvantaging and discriminating against underprivileged groups (those living in remote areas, unemployed, impoverished disabled, disconnected, elderly) and favoring privileged individuals. Third and finally, sharing services may disempower users by detaching them from their possessions, by relying on opaque algorithms and creating new forms of distinction such as aruch as arbitrary rating systems, where manipulation is easy and possibilities to challenge the ratings are limited. We research the topic from a multi-disciplinary social science perspective and include a variety of methodological approaches as well as research contexts with our collaboration partners. To quantify these findings, we follow up with quantitative surveys that give us solid evidence on how power, privacy and participation are at play with sharing. By aggregating our findings in design principles for sharing platforms we intend to bring the design of sharing platforms to a new level of maturity by support the user centered, responsible and fair design of sharing platforms.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: EURO-4-2014 | Award Amount: 2.48M | Year: 2015

ENLIGHTEN responds to the first part of the EURO-4 call on The future of European integration - More Europe less Europe? by bringing together an interdisciplinary next generation research team that integrates insights from Comparative Political Economy, European Studies, International Political Economy, and Sociology. ENLIGHTEN answers the call by focusing on how European modes of governance respond to fast-burning and slow-burning crises. These types of crises differ in how they affect the legitimacy of European input, output, and throughput processes in established and emergent modes of governance. In fast-burning crises interests are quickly formed and ideational and resource battles ensue over how to coordinate policy ideas, what institutions should be engaged, and communicating these changes to the public. Networks in fast crises are composed of defined groups seeking to protect or carve out their interests. In slow-burning crises interests are less obvious and the key task is often how to define the issues involved and who should address the problem. Here networks are commonly composed of experts who battle over how issues should be defined, as well as the boundaries on how coordinative and communicative discourses are articulated. Both fast- and slow-burning crises must be addressed by European modes of governance, with serious implications for the legitimacy and efficiency of the European project. Both raise political, social, and economic sensitivities that are transforming democratic politics in Europe. ENLIGHTEN addresses these themes through a series of linked cases that speak directly to the legitimacy and efficiency of European modes of governance.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: ICT-28-2015 | Award Amount: 4.80M | Year: 2016

Sepsis is a potentially fatal condition that arises when the bodys response to an infection damages its own tissues and organs. It is mainly caused by bacteria and fungi, which spread through the blood circulation. It is one of the biggest public health issue in the EU and worldwide due to its high incidence, mortality, human and economic cost. Early diagnosis is crucial to the management of sepsis, as every hour of delay of appropriate antibiotic therapy increases mortality by 5-10%. Unfortunately, sepsis diagnosis remains one of the greatest clinical challenges in critical care. Current diagnostic methods, including blood culture and different nucleic acid based multiplex technologies, are impaired by the significant time-delay of 1-2 days and/or low sensitivity of 30-50%. Hence there is an urgent need to develop new diagnostic tools that can provide more accurate and earlier sepsis diagnosis, so that patients with sepsis can be administered with rapid and correct initial antimicrobial treatment. The SMARTDIAGNOS project will advance sepsis diagnosis by simplifying clinical sample analysis methods and integrating the currently required numerous steps into a single streamlined device. This will be achieved by combining a number of innovative technologies: 1) 3-dimentional sample concentration to process large amount of raw sample; 2) direct PCR in the 3D microstructure to circumvent DNA extraction step; 3) solid-phase PCR to achieve unlimited multiplexing capability; 4) supercritical angle fluorescence (SAF) microlens array for enhanced fluorescence detection and precise quantification of sepsis-related pathogens. The SMARTDIAGNOS system will go beyond the state of the art for shorter time (1-3 h), higher sensitivity (95%), higher selectivity (99%), multiplexing capability, antimicrobial resistance profiling, and automation. Fast and correct sepsis diagnosis will improve patient outcome, shorten intensive care stay and thus reduce health costs.

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