COPELABS Cognition and People centric Computing Laboratories

Lisbon, Portugal

COPELABS Cognition and People centric Computing Laboratories

Lisbon, Portugal
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Gamito P.,University of Lisbon | Gamito P.,COPELABS Cognition and People centric Computing Laboratories | Oliveira J.,University of Lisbon | Oliveira J.,COPELABS Cognition and People centric Computing Laboratories | And 10 more authors.
Methods of Information in Medicine | Year: 2017

Background: Heroin addiction has a negative impact on cognitive functions, and even recovering addicts suffer from cognitive impairment. Recent approaches to cognitive intervention have been taking advantage of what new technologies have to offer. Objectives: We report a study testing the efficacy of a serious games approach using tablets to stimulate and rehabilitate cognitive functions in recovering addicts. Methods: A small-scale cognitive training program with serious games was run with a sample of 14 male heroin addicts undergoing a rehabilitation program. Results: We found consistent improvements in cognitive functioning between baseline and follow-up assessments for frontal lobe functions, verbal memory and sustained attention, as well as in some aspects of cognitive flexibility, decision-making and in depression levels. More than two thirds of patients in cognitive training had positive outcomes related to indicators of verbal memory cognitive flexibility, which contrasts to patients not in training, in which only one patient improved between baseline and follow-up. Conclusions: The results are promising but still require randomized control trials to determine the efficiency of this approach to cognitive rehabilitation programs for the cognitive recovery of heroin addicts. © Schattauer 2017.


Rosa P.J.,University of Lisbon | Rosa P.J.,COPELABS Cognition and People centric Computing Laboratories | Rosa P.J.,Instituto Universitario Of Lisbon Iscte Iul | Gamito P.,University of Lisbon | And 9 more authors.
Methods of Information in Medicine | Year: 2017

Background: An adequate behavioral response depends on attentional and mnesic processes. When these basic cognitive functions are impaired, the use of non-immersive Virtual Reality Applications (VRAs) can be a reliable technique for assessing the level of impairment. However, most non-immersive VRAs use indirect measures to make inferences about visual attention and mnesic processes (e.g., time to task completion, error rate). Objectives: To examine whether the eye movement analysis through eye tracking (ET) can be a reliable method to probe more effectively where and how attention is deployed and how it is linked with visual working memory during comparative visual search tasks (CVSTs) in non-immersive VRAs. Methods: The eye movements of 50 healthy participants were continuously recorded while CVSTs, selected from a set of cognitive tasks in the Systemic Lisbon Battery (SLB). Then a VRA designed to assess of cognitive impairments were randomly presented. Results: The total fixation duration, the number of visits in the areas of interest and in the interstimulus space, along with the total execution time was significantly different as a function of the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates that CVSTs in SLB, when combined with ET, can be a reliable and unobtrusive method for assessing cognitive abilities in healthy individuals, opening it to potential use in clinical samples. © Schattauer 2017.


Gamito P.,Lusophone University of Humanities and Technologies | Gamito P.,COPELABS Cognition and People centric Computing Laboratories | Oliveira J.,Lusophone University of Humanities and Technologies | Oliveira J.,COPELABS Cognition and People centric Computing Laboratories | And 11 more authors.
Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking | Year: 2014

Craving is a strong desire to consume that emerges in every case of substance addiction. Previous studies have shown that eliciting craving with an exposure cues protocol can be a useful option for the treatment of nicotine dependence. Thus, the main goal of this study was to develop a virtual platform in order to induce craving in smokers. Fifty-five undergraduate students were randomly assigned to two different virtual environments: high arousal contextual cues and low arousal contextual cues scenarios (17 smokers with low nicotine dependency were excluded). An eye-tracker system was used to evaluate attention toward these cues. Eye fixation on smoking-related cues differed between smokers and nonsmokers, indicating that smokers focused more often on smoking-related cues than nonsmokers. Self-reports of craving are in agreement with these results and suggest a significant increase in craving after exposure to smoking cues. In sum, these data support the use of virtual environments for eliciting craving. © Copyright 2014, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2014.


Banovic M.,University of Aarhus | Chrysochou P.,University of Aarhus | Chrysochou P.,University of South Australia | Grunert K.G.,University of Aarhus | And 5 more authors.
Food Quality and Preference | Year: 2016

In this paper we study the effect of fat content on visual attention and choice of red meat, as well as differences across gender. In an eye-tracking study, conducted with 105 Portuguese meat consumers, we find that fat content has an impact on visual attention, choice reaction time and choice of red meat products. Consumers pay more attention and choose more often meat products with lower fat content. This impact is further gender specific, with female consumers paying more attention and requiring less time to choose meat products with lower fat content. In contract, male consumers pay more attention to red meat products with higher fat content, but spend more time to choose red meat products with lower fat content. We discuss managerial and theoretical implications in relation to marketing of red meat products. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

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