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HARRISBURG, Pa., Dec. 8, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Commonwealth Response Coordination Center (CRCC) at PA Emergency Management Agency headquarters outside Harrisburg has activated in response to a significant multi-vehicle accident and road closure on I-90 in Erie County....


Wang Q.,Coordination Center | Fan P.,Tsinghua University | Letaief K.B.,Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology | Year: 2012

In the paper, we investigate the information spread problem in a joint vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) and vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication system. A scene is considered where more information centers (or base stations) are allocated along the road so that the information centers are able to broadcast timely messages to vehicles within the range of the broadcast signal of each base station, which we shall refer to as broadcast zone. The seamless information spread is used to guarantee that messages are correctly received by each vehicle, regardless of whether it pulls into broadcast zones or not. We first derive the maximum throughput of the V2I downlink system for both additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channels and Rayleigh fading channels with Doppler effects. A measurement-based algorithm to estimate the throughput is also proposed. We then discuss the maximum achievable amount of information that can be relayed forward along a vehicular stream. A network coding technique will then be proposed to cancel the interference caused by relay signals to vehicles that are receiving messages from the corresponding information center. These theoretical results will give more insight into the vehicular communication system design. © 2011 IEEE.


News Article | January 6, 2016
Site: www.washingtonpost.com

Last year’s wildfire season set a record with more than 10 million acres burned. That’s more land than Maryland, the District and Delaware combined. More than half the total was the result of mega-fires in Alaska, where dryness due to historically low mountain snowpack and a freak lightning storm created perfect conditions for a huge blaze. The nation’s overall toll was about 4 million acres more than the yearly average, scorching a record set in 2006. The record was anticipated by the U.S. Forest Service, the Agriculture Department division charged with fighting fires, because of climate change and a prolonged drought in western states that parched wilderness areas. Alaska’s wildfire season was its second worst ever, and both Washington and Oregon suffered historic burns. Those two states were on pace to break records as early as September, with nearly 2 million acres charred between them. [Wildfires cost more to fight, but Congress keeps refusing to foot the bill] Agriculture Department officials have warned that fire seasons are starting earlier and lasting longer than years ago, and they’ve sought to convince Congress to change the way it funds firefighting because its budget appropriation falls short nearly every year. So far, Congress has refused. Lawmakers base their funding on the average cost to fight fires over the previous decade. But that doesn’t account for wildfire seasons that now run from April through December instead of June to September. It once was rare to see 5 million cumulative acres burn in a year, fire officials say, but recent seasons have recorded twice that. At least two controlled wildfires are currently burning in California and Texas, according to the National Interagency Fire Center. To cover the budget shortfalls for firefighting, the Agriculture Department robs the funding of other parts of the Forest Service, some of them devoted to fire prevention. In December, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack told lawmakers that practice would stop and issued an angry ultimatum: If you want the Forest Service to keep putting out huge wildfires, then pay for it up front. Vilsack was upset because Congress set aside $1.6 billion to pay for wildfire suppression in 2016, ignoring that the Forest Service spent $100 million more than that to fight blazes even before 2015 ended. The service paid $243 million in a single week in August to suppress fires — another record. By 2025, the Forest Service estimates, fighting fires will eat 67 percent of its budget, a seismic increase from 16 percent in 1995. [West Coast residents are caught in a line of fire from California to Washington] “This directly impacts the Forest Service’s ability to fund other critical work such as restoration that can reduce wildfire threat, drinking water area protection, and recreation investments, not just in the West, but across the country,” Vilsack wrote last month. In last year’s strange season, California, staggered by a four-year drought, experienced about a thousand more fires than usual, but they at least were smaller burns that allowed the state to escape the monster infernos officials predicted. The Pacific Northwest, which was suffering its own historic drought, was harder hit. Washington was so dry that Olympic National Park, a rain forest and arguably one of the wettest areas in North America, caught fire and burned for weeks. A single fire, the Canyon Creek Complex, burned 110,000 acres in Oregon. Ninety-eight fires met the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center “large fires” criteria.


Shao J.,Zhejiang GongShang University | Liu P.,Pennsylvania State University | Zhou Y.,Coordination Center
Journal of Systems and Software | Year: 2012

In proxy re-encryption (PRE), a semi-trusted proxy can transform a ciphertext under the delegator's public key into another ciphertext that the delegatee can decrypt by his/her own private key. However, the proxy cannot access the plaintext. Due to its transformation property, proxy re-encryption can be used in many applications, such as encrypted email forwarding. Some of these applications require that the underlying PRE scheme is CCA-secure and key-private. However, to the best of our knowledge, none of the existing PRE schemes satisfy this security requirement in the standard model. In this paper, based on the 5-Extended Decision Bilinear Diffie-Hellman assumption and Decision Diffie-Hellman assumption, we propose the first such PRE scheme, which solves an open problem left by Ateniese et al. (2009). © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The largest military base in the world will now be part of the regional NCServes Networ,k bringing together Raleigh, Durham and Fayetteville areas’ human service providers across the state to more effectively manage medical, financial, employment, housing and other resource requests from veterans and their families. This new network affiliate, known locally as NCServes RDU/Fayetteville, is the second of four launching statewide. It is part of the Institute for Veteran and Military Families (IVMF) at Syracuse University’s national portfolio of America Serves programs that has connected thousands of veterans, service members, and military families to more than 6,300 types of comprehensive services in less than two years. NCServes RDU/Fayetteville will enable local service members, veterans, and their families easy access—online or in person—to a comprehensive array of services, resources, and care organized specifically around their needs. By linking local providers, it is designed to ensure that positive and quality referrals are made throughout the “Triangle” region spanning Durham to Cumberland. The initiative is driven by a shared software platform that connects all participating federal, state, and non-profit veteran service providers allowing them to make, quick, smart referrals and track outcomes. NCServes RDU/Fayetteville then follows-up on the progress of requests, greatly reducing denial of services experienced by service members and veterans due to capacity or eligibility restrictions. “This would have saved lives, if we had something like this when I came back from Vietnam,” said retired Army Lt.Col. Ray Schrump. Now a leading veterans' advocate in Fayetteville, NC, then-Maj. Schrump was a Green Beret serving in the Vietnam War when he was captured in 1968. Released in 1973 after serving many grueling years as a POW, Lt.Col. Schrump has been a fierce advocate for veterans and has been active in the Fayetteville-area effort to launch the NCServes Network. The NCServes RDU/Fayetteville network is locally coordinated by the United Service Organizations of North Carolina (USO-NC) in partnership with IVMF. All software, trainings, and licenses are all provided at no cost to the North Carolina community thanks to generous support locally by the Walmart Foundation, the Leon Levine Foundation and The Foundation for the Carolinas. “For 75 years, the USO of NC has accomplished its mission of keeping America’s service members connected to family, home, and country, throughout their service to the nation by delivering innovative programs, morale-boosting services and leveraging key partnerships in the community,” said retired Army Lt.Col. John Falkenbury, President, USO of North Carolina.  “Serving as the Coordination Center for Fayetteville, the largest defense community in the world, and tying it into to our efforts in Raleigh, Durham and around the state will create a seamless provider network with “no wrong door.”” Individuals looking for services can engage the NCServes RDU/Fayetteville network four different ways: 1. By phone at the network’s toll-free number 1-800-459-8387 where they can speak with a qualified professional to secure a referral for services and the commitment for follow up. 2. Online via the NCServes website at NCServes.org. 3. In-person at the NCServes RDU/Fayetteville participating NCServes regional providers. 4. Via North Carolina’s State resource line: NC4Vets.com and (844) NC4-VETS “After 26 years in the Army, I’m proud to bring an effort like this home to Ft. Bragg, where it belongs,” said retired Army Colonel Jim McDonough, Managing Director of IVMF and a former Director of the New York State Division of Veterans’ Affairs. “After years of ground work with really dedicated partners, and working closely with NCDMVA Secretary Wilson, the Governor and the State of North Carolina, we are proud to see this initiative grow from Charlotte, to Raleigh/Durham, and now Fayetteville.” In November, NCServes Coastal will launch the network to the US Marine Corps and Air Force installations of the Carolina Coast, tying in to adjacent networks in South Carolina and Virginia. About the United Service Organizations of North Carolina For 75 years, the United Service Organizations of North Carolina has accomplished its mission of keeping America’s service members connected to family, home, and country, throughout their service to the nation by delivering innovative programs, morale-boosting services and leveraging key partnerships in the community that demonstrate North Carolina’s appreciation for their service and sacrifice.  The original USO formed as a result of a request made by President Franklin D. Roosevelt during World War II for six key community organizations to come together and lift the morale of service members both on the Homefront and downrange.  This heritage of community networks has demonstrated a lasting impact on service members, veterans and their families. For more information, please visit http://uso-nc.org/ About Syracuse University's Institute for Veterans and Military Families The IVMF is the first interdisciplinary national institute in higher education focused on the social, economic, education and policy issues impacting veterans and their families post-service. Supported by a world-class advisory board and public and private partners committed to advancing the post-service lives of America’s service members, veterans and their families, the IVMF and its professional staff deliver class-leading programs in career, vocations, and entrepreneurship education and training. The IVMF also provides actionable and national impacting research, policy analysis and program evaluation; coordinates comprehensive collective impact strategies; and works with communities and non-profits to enhance service delivery for veterans and their families. Read more at http://vets.syr.edu/


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Members of the Florida Wing and their counterparts in other Civil Air Patrol wings along the Atlantic Coast are busy preparing for the impact and potential aftermath of Hurricane Matthew, a Category 3 storm expected to make landfall in the Bahamas on Thursday and skirt the Florida coastline on Friday. “Florida Wing has done a wonderful job getting out front and ahead of the storm,” said Col. Barry Melton, CAP’s Southeast Region commander. “Seventeen Florida Wing aircraft were successfully relocated to the Panhandle yesterday, and nightly HURCON teleconferences have been taking place since last Saturday evening. Georgia Wing is relocating their two coastal aircraft today.” As Matthew made landfall in Haiti on Tuesday, the Florida Wing upgraded its military hurricane condition status to HURCON4. The upgrade from HURCON3 comes with an expectation the eastern coastline of the state will experience 50-knot or greater winds within the next 72 hours. “The Florida Wing leadership continues to monitor the situation closely, executing plans detailed in the wing’s hurricane plan. Aircrews are being identified for potential asset relocation while qualified response personnel prepare equipment for potential post disaster response,” said Lt. Col. Robert Sims, also of the Southeast Region, in a message on the Florida Wing website. The Southeast Region staff, along with wing commanders and their staffs in Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee, are scheduled to begin readiness teleconferences tonight. “These wings stand ready to assist the Florida and Georgia wings,” said Melton. “Southeast Region is prepared to stand up an Area Command to coordinate resources if needed.” Several states in CAP’s Middle East Region are also in the storm’s path. South Carolina and North Carolina wing leaders plan to provide personnel for their states’ emergency operations centers, beginning this weekend. Civil Air Patrol, the longtime all-volunteer U.S. Air Force auxiliary, is the newest member of the Air Force’s Total Force, which consists of regular Air Force, Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve, along with Air Force retired military and civilian employees. CAP, in its Total Force role, operates a fleet of 550 aircraft and performs about 90 percent of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center and is credited by the AFRCC with saving an average of 78 lives annually. Civil Air Patrol’s 56,000 members nationwide also perform homeland security, disaster relief and drug interdiction missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies. Its members additionally play a leading role in aerospace education and serve as mentors to more than 24,000 young people currently participating in the CAP cadet program. Performing missions for America for the past 75 years, CAP received the Congressional Gold Medal in 2014 in honor of the heroic efforts of its World War II veterans. CAP also participates in Wreaths Across America, an initiative to remember, honor and teach about the sacrifices of U.S. military veterans. Visit http://www.capvolunteernow.com for more information


News Article | November 3, 2015
Site: phys.org

The objects orbits Earth with a period of about three weeks. Because it was also observed twice in 2013 by the same survey team, astronomers have the data they need to model its orbit and trajectory, and as far anyone can tell, it's likely man-made. Solar radiation pressure, the physical "push" exerted by photons of sunlight, is proportional to a space object's area-to-mass ratio. Small, lightweight objects get pushed around more easily than heavier, denser ones. Taking that factor into account in examining WT1190F's motion over two years, the survey team has indirectly measured WT1190F's density at about 10% that of water. This is too low to be a typical asteroid made of rock, but a good fit with a hollow shell, possibly the upper stage of a rocket. It's also quite small, at most only about six feet or a couple of meters in diameter. Most or all of it is likely to burn up upon re-entry, creating a spectacular show for anyone near the scene. During the next week and a half, the European Space Agency's NEO (Near-Earth Object) Coordination Center is organizing observing campaigns to collect as much data as possible on the object, according to a posting on their website. The agency has two goals: to better understand satellite re-entries from high orbits and to use the opportunity to test our readiness for a possible future event involving a real asteroid. The latter happened once before when 2008 TC3 (a real asteroid) was spotted on October 6, 2008 and predicted to strike Earth the very next day. Incredibly, it did and peppered the Sudan with meteorites that were later recovered. Assuming WT1190F is artificial, its trans-lunar orbit (orbit that carries it beyond the Moon) hints at several possibilities. Third stages from the Saturn-V rockets that launched the Apollo missions to the Moon are still out there. It could also be a stage from one of the old Russian or more recent Chinese lunar missions. Even rockets used to give interplanetary probes a final push are game. Case in point. What was thought initially to be a new asteroid discovered by amateur astronomer Bill Yeung on September 3, 2002 proved a much better fit with an Apollo 12 S-IVB (third) stage after University of Arizona astronomers found that spectra taken of the object strongly correlated with absorption features seen in a combination of man-made materials including white paint, black paint, and aluminum, all consistent with Saturn V rockets. Apollo 13's booster was the first deliberately crashed into the Moon, where it blew out it a crisp, 98-foot-wide (30-meter) crater. Why do such a crazy thing? What better way to test the seismometers left by the Apollo 12 crew? All subsequent boosters ended their lives similarly in the name of seismography. Third stages from earlier missions—Apollos 8, 10 and 11— entered orbit around the Sun, while Apollo 12, which orbiting Earth, briefly masqueraded as asteroid J002E3. Bill Gray at Project Pluto has a page up about the November 13 impact of WT1190F with more information. Satellite and asteroid watchers are hoping to track the object before and right up until it burns up in the atmosphere. Currently, it's extremely faint and moving eastward in Orion. You can click here for an ephemeris giving its position at the JPL Horizons site. How exciting if we could see whatever's coming down before its demise on Friday the 13th! Near-Earth object J002E3 discovery images taken by Bill Yeung on September 3, 2002. The 16th magnitude object was tentatively identified as the Apollo 12 third stage rocket. Credit: Bob Denny. On April 14th 1970, the Apollo 13 Saturn IVB upper stage impacted the moon north of Mare Cognitum. The impact crater, which is roughly 30 meters in diameter, is clearly visible in this photo taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. Credit: NASA/Goddard/Arizona State University The nominal impact point is located about 60 miles south of the island nation Sri Lanka. Given the object’s small size and mass, it will likely be completely incinerated during re-entry. Credit: Bill Gray at Project Pluto


Benamouzig R.,AP HP | Uzzan B.,University of Paris 13 | Deyra J.,Coordination Center | Martin A.,University of Paris 13 | And 3 more authors.
Gut | Year: 2012

Background: Aspirin inhibits colorectal carcinogenesis. In a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial, daily soluble aspirin significantly reduced recurrence of colorectal adenomas at 1-year follow-up. In this study the results of daily intake of low-dose aspirin on polyp recurrence at 4-year follow-up are presented. Methods: 272 patients (naive for chronic aspirin use) with colorectal adenomas were randomly assigned to treatment with lysine acetylsalicylate 160 mg/day (n=73) or 300 mg/day (n=67) or placebo (n=132) for 4 years. The primary endpoints were adenoma recurrence and adenomatous polyp burden at year 4, comparing aspirin at either dose with placebo. The same endpoints were also assessed at year 1 or 4 (last colonoscopy performed for each patient). Results: At the final year 4 colonoscopy the analysis included 185 patients (55 receiving aspirin 160 mg/day, 47 aspirin 300 mg/day and 83 placebo). There was no difference in the proportion of patients with at least one recurrent adenoma between patients receiving aspirin at either dose and those treated with placebo (42/102 (41%) vs 33/83 (40%); NS) or in the adenomatous polyp burden (3.1±5.8 mm vs 3.4±6.2 mm; NS). Also, the proportion of patients with at least one advanced recurrent adenoma did not differ (10/182 (10%) in the aspirin group vs 7/83 (7%) in the placebo group; NS). Conclusion: Daily low-dose aspirin decreased adenoma recurrence significantly at 1 year but not at year 4. This discrepancy might be explained by a differential effect of aspirin according to the natural history of the polyp. Trial Registration Number: NCT 00224679.


News Article | October 28, 2015
Site: www.techtimes.com

Will the crash-landing of the massive space object aptly nicknamed as "WTF 1190" be humanity's tragic doom? Not really, experts say. The space object, which was technically termed WT1190F, has garnered attention from social media users for its strangely comical name and mysterious nature. Although it is still unidentified, it is predicted by scientists to plunge into the Indian Ocean on Friday the 13th next month. Astronomers from the European Space Agency (ESA) clarified that the impact of the space object may pose little threat to anyone, and that studying the WT1190F even provides scientific opportunity to understand how space objects behave within the Earth's atmosphere. Dr. Tim Flohrer, head of ESA's Space Situational Awareness Program office, explained that the space object is only a couple of inches in diameter, and that parts of it will completely burn up even before crashing into the planet. The mass of the space object is not enough to cause any danger, but the WT1190F's crash-landing will be quite spectacular as its burning fragments brighten up in the sky. Researchers from ESA say that the WT1190F is likely a man-made object from several lunar missions, or it may even be equipment from the Apollo space expedition. Meanwhile, the space agency's Near-Earth Objects Coordination Center (NEOCC) have been collecting and examining data regarding the WT1190F. Marco Micheli, an astronomer at the NEOCC, said that the event is a chance for astronomers to perform and practice readiness tests in case any future asteroid entries crash into the atmosphere. He explained that the components of the space object are very similar to the components of asteroids. "What we planned to do seems to work. But it's still three weeks to go," said Gerhard Drolshagen, co-manager of the research team. Researchers believe that there are possibly more pieces of space junk orbiting around the planet. It is more likely that some have made their entry into the Earth without anyone noticing, they say. Scientists also said that finding space objects which may potentially bring destruction to areas on land do not get any funding or attention. The U.S. military, despite being able to track space objects, admitted that they lack the resources to predict the path of the WT1190F.


Miyachi T.,Coordination Center | Narita H.,Coordination Center | Yamada H.,Coordination Center | Furuta H.,Coordination Center
Proceedings of the SICE Annual Conference | Year: 2011

Stuxnet was reported as the first malware specifically targeting control systems. Many people had believed control systems were not targets of cyber attacks before Stuxnet. This paper discusses this kind of gaps between the perception and reality on cyber security of control systems, and how stakeholders of control systems should address the new threat trends such as Stuxnet to improve the security level of their control systems. © 2011 SICE.

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