Cooperative Research Center for Infrastructure and Engineering Asset Management

Brisbane, Australia

Cooperative Research Center for Infrastructure and Engineering Asset Management

Brisbane, Australia
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Wiewiora A.,Southern Cross University of Australia | Wiewiora A.,Cooperative Research Center for Infrastructure and Engineering Asset Management | Trigunarsyah B.,Queensland University of Technology | Murphy G.,Cooperative Research Center for Infrastructure and Engineering Asset Management | And 2 more authors.
International Journal of Project Management | Year: 2013

A considerable amount of research has confirmed the relationship between organizational culture and knowledge sharing behaviours. However, less research has been conducted on the impact of project sub-cultures in relation to the sharing of knowledge between projects, particularly in project based organizations (PBOs). The unique structures and contexts characterized by PBOs indicate the need to investigate further the impact of cultures present within PBOs and their effect on knowledge sharing. We report on a rich case study of four large Australian-based PBOs whereby the cultural values of these large organizations were seen to impact significantly on whether project teams were more or less likely to improve inter-project knowledge sharing. Furthermore, this research demonstrates the utility of using Cameron and Quinn's (2005) Competing Values Framework to evaluate culture in the context of PBOs. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and PMA.


Brunetto Y.,Southern Cross University of Australia | Brunetto Y.,Cooperative Research Center for Infrastructure and Engineering Asset Management | Xerri M.,Southern Cross University of Australia | Xerri M.,Cooperative Research Center for Infrastructure and Engineering Asset Management | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Management in Engineering | Year: 2014

This study developed a path model to examine the impact of perceived organizational support and leader-member exchange on organizational culture within asset management organizations in Australia. Additionally, a path from organizational culture to employee engagement was also examined. Survey responses from 90 technical and engineering employees within asset management organizations were analyzed using partial least squares modeling. The results provide support that perceived organizational support and leader-member exchange were positively and significantly related to organizational culture and that organizational culture was positively and significantly related to employee engagement. As a result, the findings from this study provide asset managers with insights to assist the movement from reactive to proactive organizational cultures and to enhance the engagement of asset management engineering and technical employees with optimizing the performance and competitiveness of their organizations. © 2014 American Society of Civil Engineers.


Lin T.R.,Cooperative Research Center for Infrastructure and Engineering Asset Management | Lin T.R.,Queensland University of Technology
Journal of Sound and Vibration | Year: 2012

An analytical solution is presented in this paper for the vibration response of a ribbed plate clamped on all its boundary edges by employing a traveling wave solution. A clamped ribbed plate test rig is also assembled in this study for the experimental investigation of the ribbed plate response and to provide verification results to the analytical solution. The dynamic characteristics and mode shapes of the ribbed plate are measured and compared to those obtained from the analytical solution and from finite element analysis (FEA). General good agreements are found between the results. Discrepancies between the computational and experimental results at low and high frequencies are also discussed. Explanations are offered in the study to disclose the mechanism causing the discrepancies. The dependency of the dynamic response of the ribbed plate on the distance between the excitation force and the rib is also investigated experimentally. It confirms the findings disclosed in a previous analytical study [T.R. Lin, J. Pan, A closed form solution for the dynamic response of finite ribbed plates, Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 119 (2006) 917-925] that the vibration response of a clamped ribbed plate due to a point force excitation is controlled by the plate stiffness when the source is more than a quarter plate bending wavelength away from the rib and from the plate boundary. The response is largely affected by the rib stiffness when the source location is less than a quarter bending wavelength away from the rib. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Sun Y.,Cooperative Research Center for Infrastructure and Engineering Asset Management | Sun Y.,Queensland University of Technology | Fidge C.,Cooperative Research Center for Infrastructure and Engineering Asset Management | Fidge C.,Queensland University of Technology | And 2 more authors.
ICQR2MSE 2011 - Proceedings of 2011 International Conference on Quality, Reliability, Risk, Maintenance, and Safety Engineering | Year: 2011

Linear (or continuous) assets such as railway lines, roads, pipelines and cables are essential in modern society. They play an important socioeconomic role and thus need to be maintained in a way that guarantees their reliability. Linear assets usually span long distances and can be divided into different segments, all of which perform the same function but may be subject to different loads and environmental conditions. Linear assets are usually well-engineered, long-lived assets. As a result, when conducting a reliability analysis, we often only have sparse right-censored failure records, as the majority of segments have not yet failed. Furthermore, many existing linear assets were built decades ago, and their failure and maintenance histories have not been recorded in detail until very recently, leading to a left-censored failure dataset. In addition to having incomplete failure data, linear assets, over their life spans, often present multiple failure characteristics and follow mixed failure distributions, typically a combination of exponential and Weibull distributions. A model that can effectively address these three issues has yet to be developed. In this paper, we present a hazard based predictive method to meet this need. Initially, a training hazard dataset is built up based on the available, incomplete historical failure data. This is then used to develop a parametric hybrid empirical hazard model which is finally used for reliability analysis and prediction. © 2011 IEEE.


Bish A.J.,Queensland University of Technology | Bish A.J.,Cooperative Research Center for Infrastructure and Engineering Asset Management | Newton C.J.,Queensland University of Technology | Newton C.J.,Cooperative Research Center for Infrastructure and Engineering Asset Management | And 6 more authors.
European Journal of Engineering Education | Year: 2014

Engineering asset management (EAM) is a rapidly growing and developing field. However, efforts to select and develop engineers in this area are complicated by our lack of understanding of the full range of competencies required to perform. This exploratory study sought to clarify and categorise the professional competencies required of individuals at different hierarchical levels within EAM. Data from 14 field interviews, 61 online surveys, and 10 expert panel interviews were used to develop an initial professional competency framework. Overall, nine competency clusters were identified. These clusters indicate that engineers working in this field need to be able to collaborate and influence others, complete objectives within organisational guidelines, and be able to manage themselves effectively. Limitations and potential uses of this framework in engineering education and research are discussed. © 2014 © 2014 SEFI.


Siddhpura A.,University of Western Australia | Siddhpura A.,Cooperative Research Center for Infrastructure and Engineering Asset Management | Paurobally R.,University of Western Australia | Paurobally R.,Cooperative Research Center for Infrastructure and Engineering Asset Management
International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology | Year: 2013

Flank wear is the most commonly observed and unavoidable phenomenon in metal cutting which is also a major source of economic loss resulting due to material loss and machine down time. A wide variety of monitoring techniques have been developed for the online detection of flank wear. In order to provide a broad view of flank wear monitoring techniques and their implementation in tool condition monitoring system (TCMS), this paper reviews three key features of a TCMS, namely (1) signal acquisition, (2) signal processing and feature extraction, and (3) artificial intelligence techniques for decision making. © 2012 Springer-Verlag London Limited.


McKee K.K.,Curtin University Australia | McKee K.K.,Cooperative Research Center for Infrastructure and Engineering Asset Management | Forbes G.L.,Curtin University Australia | Mazhar I.,Curtin University Australia | And 3 more authors.
Advances in Applied Mechanics Research, Conference Proceedings - 7th Australasian Congress on Applied Mechanics, ACAM 2012 | Year: 2012

The ISO standard 10816 gives acceptance levels of vibration for centrifugal pumps in the form of a severity Chart. The measured 10-1000 Hz RMS velocity vibration of pumps within a given size and physical setup can be judged against the severity chart limits to give an indication of the pumps running health. This single RMS velocity value, although having being shown to be a reasonably robust measurement tool for analysing the condition of a centrifugal pump, does not allow discrimination between failure types resulting in the increased vibration, and indeed overlooks the subtleties of the pump condition state. This limitation in the use of general RMS velocity vibration levels for use with rotating machinery health is well documented, and a vast number of more sophisticated techniques, to pin point faults in specific machinery, have been developed. These techniques, although powerful, often require detailed information, such as the number of balls in a specific bearing within the machine. This information is often not readily available for a given pump setup. Tailoring these sophisticated vibration diagnostic tools for a specific pump setup can require a considerable amount of man hours and expertise, therefore having general vibration diagnostic tools which dont require extensive data about the particular pump setup would be ideal. It is proposed in this paper that the use of Octave band spectral measurements of pump vibration can strike a better balance between the two extremes of vibration analysis being: (i) overall RMS vibration velocity levels, (ii) highly specific analysis techniques such as envelope analysis for bearing fault detection. The use of Octave band spectral measurements still allows broad employment in centrifugal pump setups without a high degree of specific setup details being required. Within this paper modification of the ISO-10816 severity charts for use with Octave frequency band measurements is presented. With the use of some in-field vibration measurements, initial justification and validation of the modified vibration severity levels is presented.


McKee K.K.,Curtin University Australia | McKee K.K.,Cooperative Research Center for Infrastructure and Engineering Asset Management | Forbes G.L.,Curtin University Australia | Forbes G.L.,Cooperative Research Center for Infrastructure and Engineering Asset Management | And 7 more authors.
Expert Systems with Applications | Year: 2015

Cavitation is one of the main problems reducing the longevity of centrifugal pumps in industry today. If the pump operation is unable to maintain operating conditions around the best efficiency point, it can be subject to conditions that may lead to vaporisation or flashing in the pipes upstream of the pump. The implosion of these vapour bubbles in the impeller or volute causes damaging effects to the pump. A new method of vibration cavitation detection is proposed in this paper, based on adaptive octave band analysis, principal component analysis and statistical metrics. Full scale industrial pump efficiency testing data was used to determine the initial cavitation parameters for the analysis. The method was then tested using vibration measured from a number of industry pumps used in the water industry. Results were compared to knowledge known about the state of the pump, and the classification of the pump according to ISO 10816. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Siddhpura M.,University of Western Australia | Siddhpura M.,Cooperative Research Center for Infrastructure and Engineering Asset Management | Paurobally R.,University of Western Australia | Paurobally R.,Cooperative Research Center for Infrastructure and Engineering Asset Management
International Journal of Machine Tools and Manufacture | Year: 2012

Chatter vibrations are present in almost all cutting operations and they are major obstacles in achieving desired productivity. Regenerative chatter is the most detrimental to any process as it creates excessive vibration between the tool and the workpiece, resulting in a poor surface finish, high-pitch noise and accelerated tool wear which in turn reduces machine tool life, reliability and safety of the machining operation. There are various techniques proposed by several researchers to predict and detect chatter where the objective is to avoid chatter occurrence in the cutting process in order to obtain better surface finish of the product, higher productivity and tool life. In this paper, some of the chatter stability prediction, chatter detection and chatter control techniques for the turning process are reviewed to summarize the status of current research in this field. The objective of this review work is to compare different chatter stability prediction, chatter detection and chatter control techniques to find out most suitable technique/s and to identify a research scope in this area. One scope of research has been identified as establishing a theoretical relationship between chatter vibration and tool wear in order to predict tool wear and tool life in the presence of chatter vibration. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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