Coop Italia

Bologna, Italy

Coop Italia

Bologna, Italy
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News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.fooddive.com

Scaling back center store, reducing labor, investing in store technology and playing up convenience are just a few trends retailers are trying to capitalize on these days. Most grocers take gradual, incremental steps toward these opportunities, but some choose to dive into innovation head first. Here are a few retailers offering intriguing takes on the industry’s most prominent trends. Combining small-town values with a dash of cutting-edge technology, Farmhouse Market in New Prague, MN is a 24-hour grocer that has an abundance of natural and organic products and zero labor costs. How is this possible? You won’t find drones patrolling the aisles or infrared sensors positioned throughout the store. Farmhouse is a self-service grocery that operates on the honor system. For $99 a year, the store’s more than 200 approved shoppers can access the shop with a special key card, gather their goods and pay via a self-checkout counter. Just to be safe, co-founder of Farmhouse Market Kendra Rasmusson and her husband, Paul, installed a camera with a video feed they can access at any time — though Rasmusson says shoplifting hasn’t been an issue yet. The couple can also monitor inventory levels and key card data that tells them who has come and gone. “One of the disadvantages of a small town, people might say, is that everybody knows your business,” Rasmusson told Food Dive. “But we thought that could work in our favor by having people looking out for each other and for a business, if they felt invested in it.” Because demand is high in the Minneapolis commuter town for natural and organic products — from Waxwing Farm produce to Joia soda — Farmhouse is also open to the public limited hours each week. “We’re the closest natural and organic store within 20 miles, and people really appreciate that we’re working with local vendors whenever we can,” said Rasmusson. Rasmusson, who works a day job in addition to overseeing the market, acknowledged it’s difficult to source so many local products with limited staffing. But even here, she and her husband have found an efficient solution: Every supplier gets his or her own key card, too. Kroger, Whole Foods, Costco and Wal-Mart are just a few retailers making deep investments in store technology. But nothing they’ve implemented so far rivals the immersive digital experience that one of Italy’s largest grocers, Coop Italia, recently unveiled. Ambitiously called the “Supermarket of the Future,” the Milan store features interactive shelf screens and sensors help shoppers peel back all sorts of information about the products they’re buying. Touch screens attached to every aisle allow customers to scroll through products and learn everything from recipes to possible allergens to a product’s carbon footprint. Displays throughout the store show daily deals and top-selling products for the day, while the store’s phone app connects to the store and allows customers to build recipes, store lists and other extras. There’s also, naturally, a juice-making robot. The marquee feature of Coop’s store, which began as a prototype back in 2015 and officially opened last December, is a collection of reflective mirrors hanging over the produce displays that track consumers’ hand movements and display information on the product they’re about to select. The minds behind the store, which in addition to Coop Italia include consulting firms Accenture and designer Carlo Ratti, insist there’s a very basic consumer insight underlying all the high-tech bells and whistles. “Every product has a precise story to tell,” Ratti, principal of Carlo Ratti Associates and a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, said in a statement. “Today, this information reaches the consumer in a fragmented way. But in the near future, we will be able to discover everything there is to know about the apple we are looking at: the tree it grew on, the CO2 it produced, the chemical treatments it received, and its journey to the supermarket shelf.” Center store sales might be declining, but most retailers wouldn’t dream of getting rid of the section altogether. Not so at The Marketplace at Guilford Food Center, where customers shop the perimeter — and only the perimeter — for everything from fresh meat to custom-made salads, gourmet burgers, sandwiches, house-brewed coffee and other prepared foods. Opened two years ago, The Marketplace took over a space formerly operated by tiny Guilford, CT’s town grocer, Guilford Food Center, which had been open since the 1920s. Rather than continue the tradition of selling shelf after shelf of packaged grocery products, the new owners hired a team of in-store chefs, built culinary stations and refashioned the store as a meal destination. As for the center aisles, the team ripped those out and replaced them with chairs and tables. “We essentially morphed the grocery store into a café where we could serve up gourmet burgers and shakes and salads and all sort of things,” Drew McLachlan, the store’s operations manager, told Food Dive. Some of the former grocer’s customers have stopped by to protest the store’s new look. But according to McLachlan, most appreciate what he calls the store’s gourmet yet reasonably priced offerings. To maintain some continuity, The Marketplace retained two of Guilford Food’s former owners, who serve as advisors. The grocery also kept the original meat department and staff, along with many of the loyal customers that came with it. The store does include a limited selection of grocery products, including milk, eggs and condiments. Mclachlan said his store’s format helps it stands out from large chains in the area. It’s also what an increasingly sophisticated, on-the-go consumer base demands. “We’re elevating the idea of eating at a market to eating at a café,” he said. The saying goes that everything’s bigger in Texas. But even by Lone Star standards, Buc-ee’s convenience stores are huge. Averaging between 50,000 and 70,000 square feet — bigger than most traditional supermarkets — Buc-ee’s carries all the c-store staples, from slushed ices to sodas and bags of trail mix, in mass quantities. Imagine the inside of a 7-11 stretched out across a Costco store. The gas pumps, which typically run more than a hundred per location, have also gotten the super-sized treatment. “It looks just like a convenience store, but instead of having three slots for beef jerky, they have 60 feet,” Jeff Lenard, vice president of strategic initiatives with the National Association of Convenience Stores, told Food Dive. “It’s whatever you want times 10.” Of course, all those packages of jerky and bags of potato chips are made for small stores and quick trips. So why is Buc-ee’s so big? For starters, the company founders understand the value of being a destination. Families traveling through Texas make a point of stopping at Buc-ee’s, where in addition to snacks and beverages they can also find colorful tchotchkes like Texas-shaped waffle irons, tie-dyed T-shirts and stuffed Buc-ee beaver mascots for kids. Buc-ee’s also sports bathrooms that have won national awards for their cleanliness. Buc-ee’s, which operates close to 40 locations throughout the state, also excels at foodservice, offering a wide variety of sandwiches, soups, and salads, along with fruit-filled delicacies known as kolaches — a Czech pastry that's popular in Texas. “Our goal was to change the experience for the traveling public when they stop and become the stop of choice,” said co-founder Arch “Beaver” Aplin III in a recent interview with Bon Appetit. This year, Buc-ee’s will open its first location in Louisiana, where Aplin said he wants to serve local cuisine like gumbo. The company also plans to build a 254 foot-long car wash — the world’s largest, of course — at its store in Katy, TX.


News Article | December 14, 2016
Site: www.gizmag.com

The Supermarket of the Future uses interactive tables to display useful information on more than 6,000 products(Credit: Carlo Ratti Associati) Would you change the food you bought if you knew more about it? The Supermarket of the Future, the new flagship store of Coop Italia, has been built on the principle that you would, with interactive tables, smart shelves and real time data visualizations providing food, deals and cooking info. The store makes use of technology developed by Carlo Ratti Associati (CRA), first demonstrated in prototype form at World Expo 2015. Where Amazon and UK supermarket Sainsbury's have focused their future store visions on making the purchasing process simpler, the Supermarket of the Future's aim is to help us make more informed and more sustainable decisions about what we buy, as well as to encourage the use of fresher, local products by educating consumers about the impacts and availability of foodstuffs. "Every product has a precise story to tell," explains CRA founder Carlo Ratti in a press release. "Today, this information reaches the consumer in a fragmented way. But in the near future, we will be able to discover everything there is to know about the apple we are looking at: the tree it grew on, the CO2 it produced, the chemical treatments it received, and its journey to the supermarket shelf." Based in the Bicocca area of Milan, Italy, the Coop Italia store has a footprint of 1,000 sq m (10,800 sq ft). It augments traditional physical aspects of supermarkets, like product displays, with digital elements. In this way, it is said to make the store more like an open-air market, insomuch as the vendor is able to provide extra information to buyers about the products they are selling. To begin with, interactive tables are used to display more than 6,000 products. These employ Microsoft Kinect sensors to detect when a customer is moving their hand towards an item and then automatically present information about the product on a mirror display above, including nutritional properties, place of origin, presence of allergens and waste disposal guidance. Related products, product promotions and other practical purchase data can also be shown. Store promotions and detailed product information can also be viewed on touchscreen displays described by project partner Accenture as acting like "augmented labels." Additional store information is provided to customers via a 20-m (66-ft) long wall of 54 monitors. This is used for notifying customers about things like special offers, cooking suggestions and daily top selling products. CRA suggests that, in the future, a free exchange area could be added to the store. Here, customers could trade home-made products, enabling everyone to act as both a producer and a consumer, while furthering the analogy of the store as a market.


MILAN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Coop Italia, Italy’s largest supermarket chain, has collaborated with Accenture (NYSE:ACN) to reinvent the customer experience in grocery shopping with the opening of its Supermarket of the Future store. The new flagship store, located in Milan’s University area of Bicocca, provides a welcoming, innovative and informative shopping environment. It merges the physical and digital to recreate the atmosphere of local open-air markets, combined with innovative digital solutions that provide useful product information, while improving store navigation. Accenture helped Coop to completely redesign the supermarket’s information architecture. Working with Avanade, a joint venture company between Accenture and Microsoft, Accenture helped implement the IT infrastructure, and analyze and develop point-of-sale touch points. The result is a modular and flexible solution, underpinned by a Microsoft Azure cloud-based platform that can be easily scaled to a large number of stores. “Following the great success and positive feedback we received when we showcased the Supermarket of the Future concept at Expo Milano 2015, we got straight to work to make our vision a reality,” said Marco Pedroni, President of Coop Italia. “Using their digital expertise, Accenture and Avanade have helped us redesign the grocery shopping experience through a digital journey that meets customer demand for information, engagement and functionality in a simple and intuitive way.” The customer experience is enabled by the implementation of interactive food display tables and smart shelves to make shopping more relevant and personalized by providing customers with a range of product information. The project incorporates a series of technical solutions originally developed by Accenture for COOP at Expo Milano 2015, based on designs by MIT professor and head of Carlo Ratti Association, Carlo Ratti, the Supermarket of the Future includes: “Through Coop’s Supermarket of the Future, we are bringing to life how the physical and the digital are capable of converging to create an engaging and immersive grocery shopping experience,” said Alberto Pozzi, managing director in Accenture’s Retail Practice in Italy. “Coop is shaping the future of supermarkets by combining hyper personalization, deep product information and connected devices in-line with customer buying journeys. We are looking forward to continued collaboration and bringing future innovation straight into the hands of Coop’s customers.” “Avanade is passionate about the power of digital innovation and how it can transform the customer experience. We are particularly excited to have helped Coop make the supermarket of the future concept a reality for its customers,” said Stefania Filippone, executive in Consumer Goods & Retail, Avanade, Italy. About Accenture Accenture is a leading global professional services company, providing a broad range of services and solutions in strategy, consulting, digital, technology and operations. Combining unmatched experience and specialized skills across more than 40 industries and all business functions – underpinned by the world’s largest delivery network – Accenture works at the intersection of business and technology to help clients improve their performance and create sustainable value for their stakeholders. With approximately 384,000 people serving clients in more than 120 countries, Accenture drives innovation to improve the way the world works and lives. Visit us at www.accenture.com.


Calamusa A.,University of Pisa | Di Marzio A.,University of Pisa | Cristofani R.,University of Pisa | Arrighetti P.,COOP Italia | And 3 more authors.
Patient Education and Counseling | Year: 2012

Objective: To evaluate information needs for safe self-medication we explored the Italian consumers' functional health literacy, specific knowledge and risk awareness about over-the-counter (OTC) medicines. Methods: A survey was conducted in the health sections of six large super stores. Data were collected from a convenience sample of 1.206 adults aged 18 years and older through a self-administered questionnaire. Results: Around 42% confused the concept of " contraindications" with that of " side effects" and were unable to calculate simple dosages. Most respondents were aware of the OTC general potential for side effects but 64.3% did not know that people with high blood pressure should use painkillers with cautions and 14.0% and 20.0% were unaware of the risks of long-term use of laxatives and nasal decongestants respectively. Higher total scores were obtained from women, highly educated people and those citing package leaflets as information sources. Conclusion: The study, the first of this type in Italy, showed an incomplete awareness of several risk areas, with regard to drug interactions and misuse/abuse. Practice implications: The results of this study were the basis of a following intervention plan tailored to the observed consumer needs and including information tools for customers and courses for the retail pharmacists. © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


Maccaferri S.,University of Bologna | Klinder A.,University of Reading | Brigidi P.,University of Bologna | Cavina P.,Coop Italia | Costabile A.,University of Reading
Applied and Environmental Microbiology | Year: 2012

Considering the increase in the consumption of yeasts as human probiotics, the aim of this study was to broadly investigate the beneficial properties of the lactic yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus (formerly Kluyveromyces fragilis) B0399. Several potential probiotic traits of K. marxianus B0399 were investigated by using in vitro assays, including adhesion and immune modulation, and the effect of the administration of 10 7 CFU/day of K. marxianus B0399 on the composition and metabolic activity of the human intestinal microbiota was investigated in a 3-stage continuous-culture system simulating the human colon. We demonstrated that this strain was highly adhesive to human enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells and modulated the immune response, inducing proinflammatory cytokines in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). In the presence of inflammatory stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), K. marxianus B0399 provoked decreases in the levels of production of proinflammatory cytokines in PBMCs and Caco-2 cells, thus ameliorating the inflammatory response. Furthermore, K. marxianus B0399 impacted the colonic microbiota, increasing the bifidobacterial concentration in the stages of the colonic model system simulating the proximal and transverse colon. The amounts of the short-chain fatty acids acetate and propionate also increased following yeast supplementation. Finally, K. marxianus B0399 was found to induce a decrease of the cytotoxic potential of the culture supernatant from the first stage of the colonic model system. The effects of K. marxianus B0399 on adhesion, immune function, and colonic microbiota demonstrate that this strain possesses a number of beneficial and strain-specific properties desirable for a microorganism considered for application as a probiotic. © 2012, American Society for Microbiology.


Parpinello G.P.,University of Bologna | Nunziatini G.,University of Bologna | Rombola A.D.,University of Bologna | Gottardi F.,COOP Italia | Versari A.,University of Bologna
Postharvest Biology and Technology | Year: 2013

A combination of near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) instrumental measurements and sensory analysis was investigated to predict solids soluble content (SSC, assessed as Brix) and to classify preference in table grape cv Italia. SSC was monitored in each berry of whole bunches in order to evaluate intra-bunch distribution and variability. NIR spectra were recorded in the spectral region 12,000-4000cm-1 (833-2500nm) using a set of 682 berries. The Partial Least Square (PLS) model based on cross-validation provided acceptable value for the main statistical parameters (coefficient of determination of cross-validation, r2: 0.85; standard error of cross-validation, SECV: 1.08; residual predictive deviation, RPD: 2.6) and was confirmed by external validation performed with 115 independent berries (coefficient of determination of prediction, rp 2: 0.82; standard error of prediction, SEP: 0.83). For consumer testing, the selected PLS model was used to predict the Brix value in 400 berries and Discriminant Analysis (DA) was then carried out to classify berries in terms of preference by relating NIR data to consumer judgment. The three defined preference clusters of berries were fully classified obtaining 100% membership. In cross-validation the value decreased especially for class 1 (78.5%) and 3 (75%) whereas class 2 obtained comparable values (98.7%). According to our results, NIR technology appears to be a promising technique for predicting SSC and obtaining information with regard to consumer preference in 'Italia' table grape for application of efficient and low cost on-line instruments in the fruit industry. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Trademark
Coop Italia | Date: 2016-02-09

Meat, fish, poultry and game, not live; meat extracts; frozen, preserved, dried and cooked fruits and vegetables and dried vegetables, namely, dried legumes; jellies, jams, compotes; eggs; milk and milk products excluding ice cream, ice milk and frozen yogurt; milk products, namely, cheese, cottage cheese, fresh unripened cheese, ripened cheese, powdered milk, and yogurt; edible oils and fats. Coffee, artificial coffee, tea, iced tea, cocoa, cocoa powder; rice; tapioca and sago; flour and preparations made from cereals, namely, breakfast cereals, cereal bars, granola bars, high protein cereal bars, and preparations made from processed cereal grains, namely, pasta; bread and bread in the nature of bread rolls, unleavened bread, bread crumbs and pita bread; pastry, namely, pastries, pastry dough, macaroons in the nature of pastry; confectionery, namely, candy bars, chocolate bars, chocolate confectionery, candy and ice cream cakes; ices and ices in the nature of ice cream; sugar, honey, treacle; yeast, baking-powder; salt; mustard; vinegar; sauces, namely, soya sauce, pesto sauces, pasta sauce, ketchup, tomato sauce, mayonnaise sauce, barnaise sauce, tartar sauce, spices; ice. Agricultural, horticultural and forestry products not include in other classes, namely, live animals, live edible aquatic animals; fresh fruits, namely, berries, fresh fruits; fresh citrus fruit, animal foodstuffs and animal foodstuffs, namely, dog biscuits; edible chews for animals; meal for animals; pet food; bird food; wheat germ for animal consumption. Beers; mineral and aerated waters and other non-alcoholic beverages, namely, alcohol-free beers, aerated water, flavored waters, seltzer water, soda water, sparkling water, spring water, still water, table water, mineral water, isotonic beverages, whey beverages, fruit-based beverages and carbonated fruit-based beverages, milk of almonds for beverages, tomato juice, vegetable juices, non-alcoholic aloe vera drinks, unfermented grape must, lithia water, sherbet beverages, smoothies, cola drinks, soft drinks flavored with chinotto, ginger ale; fruit beverages and juices; syrups and other preparations for making non-alcoholic beverages, namely, pastilles for effervescing beverages and powders for effervescing beverages. Advertising; business management; business administration; office functions.


Trademark
Coop Italia | Date: 2015-11-24

Meat, fish, poultry and game, not live; meat extracts; frozen, preserved, dried and cooked fruits and vegetables and dried vegetables, namely, dried legumes; jellies, jams, compotes; eggs; milk and milk products excluding ice cream, ice milk and frozen yogurt; milk products, namely cheese, cottage cheese, fresh unripened cheese, ripened cheese, powdered milk, and yogurt; edible oils and fats. Coffee, artificial coffee, tea, iced tea, cocoa, cocoa powder; rice; tapioca and sago; flour and preparations made from cereals, namely breakfast cereals, cereal bars, granola bars, high protein cereal bars, and preparations made from processed cereal grains, namely, pasta; bread and bread in the nature of bread rolls, unleavened bread, bread crumbs and pita bread; pastry namely pastries, pastry dough, macaroons in the nature of pastry; confectionery namely, candy bars, chocolate bars, chocolate confectionery, candy and ice cream cakes; ices and ices in the nature of ice cream; sugar, honey, treacle; yeast, baking-powder; salt; mustard; vinegar; sauces, namely, soya sauce, pesto sauces, pasta sauce, ketchup, tomato sauce, mayonnaise sauce, barnaise sauce, tartar sauce, guacamole sauce; spices; ice. Grains and agricultural, horticultural and forestry products not include in other classes namely, unprocessed grains, agricultural grains for planting, live trees; seeds for agricultural purposes, seeds for horticultural purposes, crop seeds; live animals, live edible aquatic animals; fresh fruits and vegetables, fresh fruits, namely, berries, fresh fruits; fresh citrus fruit, vegetables, namely, fresh legumes, onions, fresh vegetables and root vegetables for food; natural plants and flowers; animal foodstuffs and animal foodstuffs, namely, dog biscuits; edible chews for animals; meal for animals; pet food; bird food; wheat germ for animal consumption; malt for brewing and distilling. Advertising; business management; business administration; office functions.


Trademark
Coop Italia | Date: 2015-12-15

Meat, fish, poultry and game, not live; meat extracts; frozen, preserved, dried and cooked fruits and vegetables and dried vegetables, namely, dried legumes; jellies, jams, compotes; eggs; milk and milk products excluding ice cream, ice milk and frozen yogurt; milk products, namely, cheese, cottage cheese, fresh unripened cheese, ripened cheese, powdered milk, and yogurt; edible oils and fats. Coffee, artificial coffee, tea, iced tea, cocoa, cocoa powder; rice; tapioca and sago; flour and preparations made from cereals, namely, breakfast cereals, cereal bars, granola bars, high protein cereal bars, and preparations made from processed cereal grains, namely, pasta; bread and bread in the nature of bread rolls, unleavened bread, bread crumbs and pita bread; pastry, namely, pastries, pastry dough, macaroons in the nature of pastry; confectionery, namely, candy bars, chocolate bars, chocolate confectionery, candy and ice cream cakes; ices and ices in the nature of ice cream; sugar, honey, treacle; yeast, baking-powder; salt; mustard; vinegar; sauces, namely, soya sauce, pesto sauces, pasta sauce, ketchup, tomato sauce, mayonnaise sauce, barnaise sauce, tartar sauce; spices; ice. Grains and agricultural, horticultural and forestry products not included in other classes, namely, unprocessed grains, agricultural grains for planting, trees; seeds for agricultural purposes, seeds for horticultural purposes, crop seeds; live animals, live edible aquatic animals; fresh fruits and vegetables, fresh fruits, namely, berries, fresh fruits; fresh citrus fruit, vegetables, namely, fresh legumes, onions, fresh vegetables and root vegetables for food; natural plants and flowers; animal foodstuffs and animal foodstuffs, namely, dog biscuits; edible chews for animals; meal for animals; pet food; bird food; wheat germ for animal consumption; malt for brewing and distilling. Beers; mineral and aerated waters and other non-alcoholic beverages, namely, alcohol-free beers, aerated water, flavored waters, seltzer water, soda water, sparkling water, spring water, still water, table water, mineral water, isotonic beverages, whey beverages, fruit-based beverages and carbonated fruit-based beverages, milk of almonds for beverages, tomato juice, vegetable juices, non-alcoholic aloe vera drinks, unfermented grape must, lithia water, sherbet beverages, smoothies, cola drinks, soft drinks flavored with chinotto, ginger ale; fruit beverages and juices; syrups and other preparations for making beverages, namely, pastilles for effervescing beverages and powders for effervescing beverages. Alcoholic beverages, except beer. Advertising; business management; business administration; office functions.


Trademark
Coop Italia | Date: 2016-01-05

Meat, fish, poultry and game, not live; meat extracts; frozen, preserved, dried and cooked fruits and vegetables and dried vegetables, namely, dried legumes; jellies, jams, compotes; eggs; milk and milk products excluding ice cream, ice milk and frozen yogurt; milk products, namely, cheese, cottage cheese, fresh unripened cheese, ripened cheese, powdered milk, and yogurt; edible oils and fats. Coffee, artificial coffee, tea, iced tea, cocoa, cocoa powder; rice; tapioca and sago; flour and preparations made from cereals, namely, breakfast cereals, cereal bars, granola bars, high protein cereal bars, and preparations made from processed cereal grains, namely, pasta; bread and bread in the nature of bread rolls, unleavened bread, bread crumbs and pita bread; pastry, namely, pastries, pastry dough, macaroons in the nature of pastry; confectionery, namely, candy bars, chocolate bars, chocolate confectionery, candy and ice cream cakes; ices and ices in the nature of ice cream; sugar, honey, treacle; yeast, baking-powder; salt; mustard; vinegar; sauces, namely, soya sauce, pesto sauces, pasta sauce, ketchup, tomato sauce, mayonnaise sauce, barnaise sauce, tartar sauce; spices; ice. Live edible aquatic animals; animal foodstuffs and animal foodstuffs, namely, dog biscuits; edible chews for animals; meal for animals; pet food; bird food; wheat germ for animal consumption; malt for brewing and distilling. Beers; mineral and aerated waters and other non-alcoholic beverages, namely, alcohol-free beers, aerated water, flavored waters, seltzer water, soda water, sparkling water, spring water, still water, table water, mineral water, isotonic beverages, whey beverages, fruit-based beverages and carbonated fruit-based beverages, milk of almonds for beverages, tomato juice, vegetable juices, non-alcoholic aloe vera drinks, unfermented grape must, lithia water, sherbet beverages, smoothies, cola drinks, soft drinks flavored with chinotto, ginger ale; fruit beverages and juices; syrups and other preparations for making non-alcoholic beverages, namely, pastilles for effervescing beverages and powders for effervescing beverages. Advertising; business management; business administration; office functions.

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