Bologna, Italy
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MILAN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Coop Italia, Italy’s largest supermarket chain, has collaborated with Accenture (NYSE:ACN) to reinvent the customer experience in grocery shopping with the opening of its Supermarket of the Future store. The new flagship store, located in Milan’s University area of Bicocca, provides a welcoming, innovative and informative shopping environment. It merges the physical and digital to recreate the atmosphere of local open-air markets, combined with innovative digital solutions that provide useful product information, while improving store navigation. Accenture helped Coop to completely redesign the supermarket’s information architecture. Working with Avanade, a joint venture company between Accenture and Microsoft, Accenture helped implement the IT infrastructure, and analyze and develop point-of-sale touch points. The result is a modular and flexible solution, underpinned by a Microsoft Azure cloud-based platform that can be easily scaled to a large number of stores. “Following the great success and positive feedback we received when we showcased the Supermarket of the Future concept at Expo Milano 2015, we got straight to work to make our vision a reality,” said Marco Pedroni, President of Coop Italia. “Using their digital expertise, Accenture and Avanade have helped us redesign the grocery shopping experience through a digital journey that meets customer demand for information, engagement and functionality in a simple and intuitive way.” The customer experience is enabled by the implementation of interactive food display tables and smart shelves to make shopping more relevant and personalized by providing customers with a range of product information. The project incorporates a series of technical solutions originally developed by Accenture for COOP at Expo Milano 2015, based on designs by MIT professor and head of Carlo Ratti Association, Carlo Ratti, the Supermarket of the Future includes: “Through Coop’s Supermarket of the Future, we are bringing to life how the physical and the digital are capable of converging to create an engaging and immersive grocery shopping experience,” said Alberto Pozzi, managing director in Accenture’s Retail Practice in Italy. “Coop is shaping the future of supermarkets by combining hyper personalization, deep product information and connected devices in-line with customer buying journeys. We are looking forward to continued collaboration and bringing future innovation straight into the hands of Coop’s customers.” “Avanade is passionate about the power of digital innovation and how it can transform the customer experience. We are particularly excited to have helped Coop make the supermarket of the future concept a reality for its customers,” said Stefania Filippone, executive in Consumer Goods & Retail, Avanade, Italy. About Accenture Accenture is a leading global professional services company, providing a broad range of services and solutions in strategy, consulting, digital, technology and operations. Combining unmatched experience and specialized skills across more than 40 industries and all business functions – underpinned by the world’s largest delivery network – Accenture works at the intersection of business and technology to help clients improve their performance and create sustainable value for their stakeholders. With approximately 384,000 people serving clients in more than 120 countries, Accenture drives innovation to improve the way the world works and lives. Visit us at www.accenture.com.


Divari S.,University of Turin | Pregel P.,University of Turin | Cannizzo F.T.,University of Turin | Starvaggi Cucuzza L.,University of Turin | And 2 more authors.
Food Chemistry | Year: 2013

Growth promoter administration, in livestock, potentially poses a major threat to public health, due to the potential endocrine and carcinogenic activity of residues, accumulating in edible tissues, such as skeletal muscle. Therefore, development of new screening tests and methods for the detection of illicit treatments of food animals would be useful. In this study the serum concentrations of oxytocin peptide were measured in beef cattle receiving 17β oestradiol, dexamethasone or placebo over a period of 40 days. Changes in gene expression of oxytocin precursor in skeletal muscle were also examined in these animals. Serum analysis using an oxytocin EIA kit indicated a significant up-regulation of the biosynthesis of this nonapeptide only in cattle after 17β oestradiol, but not after dexamethasone or placebo treatment. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis showed a significant overexpression of the oxytocin precursor gene by 33.5 and 13.3-fold in cattle treated with 17β oestradiol and dexamethasone, respectively, in comparison to placebo treated animals. Regulation of gene expression by some myogenic regulatory factors in skeletal muscle was also evaluated in these animal groups, confirming the activity of both growth promoters on this gene. To investigate the use of the oxytocin precursor gene as biomarker for 17β oestradiol and dexamethasone treatment in beef cattle, an absolute quantification of this gene by qPCR was developed. A standard curve was generated and developed with TaqMan® technology and optimal criterion value, sensitivity and specificity of this screening method were established through ROC analysis. This analysis suggested that the up-regulation of oxytocin precursor gene expression in skeletal muscle tissue is a valid marker for detection of illicit 17β oestradiol and/or dexamethasone use in beef cattle. This method may serve as a novel diagnostic tool in the screening phase, and, if introduced in routine testing, may significantly improve overall efficacy and success of the food screening process ordered by state authorities. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


News Article | December 14, 2016
Site: www.gizmag.com

The Supermarket of the Future uses interactive tables to display useful information on more than 6,000 products(Credit: Carlo Ratti Associati) Would you change the food you bought if you knew more about it? The Supermarket of the Future, the new flagship store of Coop Italia, has been built on the principle that you would, with interactive tables, smart shelves and real time data visualizations providing food, deals and cooking info. The store makes use of technology developed by Carlo Ratti Associati (CRA), first demonstrated in prototype form at World Expo 2015. Where Amazon and UK supermarket Sainsbury's have focused their future store visions on making the purchasing process simpler, the Supermarket of the Future's aim is to help us make more informed and more sustainable decisions about what we buy, as well as to encourage the use of fresher, local products by educating consumers about the impacts and availability of foodstuffs. "Every product has a precise story to tell," explains CRA founder Carlo Ratti in a press release. "Today, this information reaches the consumer in a fragmented way. But in the near future, we will be able to discover everything there is to know about the apple we are looking at: the tree it grew on, the CO2 it produced, the chemical treatments it received, and its journey to the supermarket shelf." Based in the Bicocca area of Milan, Italy, the Coop Italia store has a footprint of 1,000 sq m (10,800 sq ft). It augments traditional physical aspects of supermarkets, like product displays, with digital elements. In this way, it is said to make the store more like an open-air market, insomuch as the vendor is able to provide extra information to buyers about the products they are selling. To begin with, interactive tables are used to display more than 6,000 products. These employ Microsoft Kinect sensors to detect when a customer is moving their hand towards an item and then automatically present information about the product on a mirror display above, including nutritional properties, place of origin, presence of allergens and waste disposal guidance. Related products, product promotions and other practical purchase data can also be shown. Store promotions and detailed product information can also be viewed on touchscreen displays described by project partner Accenture as acting like "augmented labels." Additional store information is provided to customers via a 20-m (66-ft) long wall of 54 monitors. This is used for notifying customers about things like special offers, cooking suggestions and daily top selling products. CRA suggests that, in the future, a free exchange area could be added to the store. Here, customers could trade home-made products, enabling everyone to act as both a producer and a consumer, while furthering the analogy of the store as a market.


Calamusa A.,University of Pisa | Di Marzio A.,University of Pisa | Cristofani R.,University of Pisa | Arrighetti P.,COOP Italia | And 3 more authors.
Patient Education and Counseling | Year: 2012

Objective: To evaluate information needs for safe self-medication we explored the Italian consumers' functional health literacy, specific knowledge and risk awareness about over-the-counter (OTC) medicines. Methods: A survey was conducted in the health sections of six large super stores. Data were collected from a convenience sample of 1.206 adults aged 18 years and older through a self-administered questionnaire. Results: Around 42% confused the concept of " contraindications" with that of " side effects" and were unable to calculate simple dosages. Most respondents were aware of the OTC general potential for side effects but 64.3% did not know that people with high blood pressure should use painkillers with cautions and 14.0% and 20.0% were unaware of the risks of long-term use of laxatives and nasal decongestants respectively. Higher total scores were obtained from women, highly educated people and those citing package leaflets as information sources. Conclusion: The study, the first of this type in Italy, showed an incomplete awareness of several risk areas, with regard to drug interactions and misuse/abuse. Practice implications: The results of this study were the basis of a following intervention plan tailored to the observed consumer needs and including information tools for customers and courses for the retail pharmacists. © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


Maccaferri S.,University of Bologna | Klinder A.,University of Reading | Brigidi P.,University of Bologna | Cavina P.,Coop Italia | Costabile A.,University of Reading
Applied and Environmental Microbiology | Year: 2012

Considering the increase in the consumption of yeasts as human probiotics, the aim of this study was to broadly investigate the beneficial properties of the lactic yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus (formerly Kluyveromyces fragilis) B0399. Several potential probiotic traits of K. marxianus B0399 were investigated by using in vitro assays, including adhesion and immune modulation, and the effect of the administration of 10 7 CFU/day of K. marxianus B0399 on the composition and metabolic activity of the human intestinal microbiota was investigated in a 3-stage continuous-culture system simulating the human colon. We demonstrated that this strain was highly adhesive to human enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells and modulated the immune response, inducing proinflammatory cytokines in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). In the presence of inflammatory stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), K. marxianus B0399 provoked decreases in the levels of production of proinflammatory cytokines in PBMCs and Caco-2 cells, thus ameliorating the inflammatory response. Furthermore, K. marxianus B0399 impacted the colonic microbiota, increasing the bifidobacterial concentration in the stages of the colonic model system simulating the proximal and transverse colon. The amounts of the short-chain fatty acids acetate and propionate also increased following yeast supplementation. Finally, K. marxianus B0399 was found to induce a decrease of the cytotoxic potential of the culture supernatant from the first stage of the colonic model system. The effects of K. marxianus B0399 on adhesion, immune function, and colonic microbiota demonstrate that this strain possesses a number of beneficial and strain-specific properties desirable for a microorganism considered for application as a probiotic. © 2012, American Society for Microbiology.


Parpinello G.P.,University of Bologna | Nunziatini G.,University of Bologna | Rombola A.D.,University of Bologna | Gottardi F.,COOP Italia | Versari A.,University of Bologna
Postharvest Biology and Technology | Year: 2013

A combination of near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) instrumental measurements and sensory analysis was investigated to predict solids soluble content (SSC, assessed as Brix) and to classify preference in table grape cv Italia. SSC was monitored in each berry of whole bunches in order to evaluate intra-bunch distribution and variability. NIR spectra were recorded in the spectral region 12,000-4000cm-1 (833-2500nm) using a set of 682 berries. The Partial Least Square (PLS) model based on cross-validation provided acceptable value for the main statistical parameters (coefficient of determination of cross-validation, r2: 0.85; standard error of cross-validation, SECV: 1.08; residual predictive deviation, RPD: 2.6) and was confirmed by external validation performed with 115 independent berries (coefficient of determination of prediction, rp 2: 0.82; standard error of prediction, SEP: 0.83). For consumer testing, the selected PLS model was used to predict the Brix value in 400 berries and Discriminant Analysis (DA) was then carried out to classify berries in terms of preference by relating NIR data to consumer judgment. The three defined preference clusters of berries were fully classified obtaining 100% membership. In cross-validation the value decreased especially for class 1 (78.5%) and 3 (75%) whereas class 2 obtained comparable values (98.7%). According to our results, NIR technology appears to be a promising technique for predicting SSC and obtaining information with regard to consumer preference in 'Italia' table grape for application of efficient and low cost on-line instruments in the fruit industry. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Trademark
Coop Italia | Date: 2016-02-09

Meat, fish, poultry and game, not live; meat extracts; frozen, preserved, dried and cooked fruits and vegetables and dried vegetables, namely, dried legumes; jellies, jams, compotes; eggs; milk and milk products excluding ice cream, ice milk and frozen yogurt; milk products, namely, cheese, cottage cheese, fresh unripened cheese, ripened cheese, powdered milk, and yogurt; edible oils and fats. Coffee, artificial coffee, tea, iced tea, cocoa, cocoa powder; rice; tapioca and sago; flour and preparations made from cereals, namely, breakfast cereals, cereal bars, granola bars, high protein cereal bars, and preparations made from processed cereal grains, namely, pasta; bread and bread in the nature of bread rolls, unleavened bread, bread crumbs and pita bread; pastry, namely, pastries, pastry dough, macaroons in the nature of pastry; confectionery, namely, candy bars, chocolate bars, chocolate confectionery, candy and ice cream cakes; ices and ices in the nature of ice cream; sugar, honey, treacle; yeast, baking-powder; salt; mustard; vinegar; sauces, namely, soya sauce, pesto sauces, pasta sauce, ketchup, tomato sauce, mayonnaise sauce, barnaise sauce, tartar sauce, spices; ice. Agricultural, horticultural and forestry products not include in other classes, namely, live animals, live edible aquatic animals; fresh fruits, namely, berries, fresh fruits; fresh citrus fruit, animal foodstuffs and animal foodstuffs, namely, dog biscuits; edible chews for animals; meal for animals; pet food; bird food; wheat germ for animal consumption. Beers; mineral and aerated waters and other non-alcoholic beverages, namely, alcohol-free beers, aerated water, flavored waters, seltzer water, soda water, sparkling water, spring water, still water, table water, mineral water, isotonic beverages, whey beverages, fruit-based beverages and carbonated fruit-based beverages, milk of almonds for beverages, tomato juice, vegetable juices, non-alcoholic aloe vera drinks, unfermented grape must, lithia water, sherbet beverages, smoothies, cola drinks, soft drinks flavored with chinotto, ginger ale; fruit beverages and juices; syrups and other preparations for making non-alcoholic beverages, namely, pastilles for effervescing beverages and powders for effervescing beverages. Advertising; business management; business administration; office functions.


Trademark
Coop Italia | Date: 2015-11-24

Meat, fish, poultry and game, not live; meat extracts; frozen, preserved, dried and cooked fruits and vegetables and dried vegetables, namely, dried legumes; jellies, jams, compotes; eggs; milk and milk products excluding ice cream, ice milk and frozen yogurt; milk products, namely cheese, cottage cheese, fresh unripened cheese, ripened cheese, powdered milk, and yogurt; edible oils and fats. Coffee, artificial coffee, tea, iced tea, cocoa, cocoa powder; rice; tapioca and sago; flour and preparations made from cereals, namely breakfast cereals, cereal bars, granola bars, high protein cereal bars, and preparations made from processed cereal grains, namely, pasta; bread and bread in the nature of bread rolls, unleavened bread, bread crumbs and pita bread; pastry namely pastries, pastry dough, macaroons in the nature of pastry; confectionery namely, candy bars, chocolate bars, chocolate confectionery, candy and ice cream cakes; ices and ices in the nature of ice cream; sugar, honey, treacle; yeast, baking-powder; salt; mustard; vinegar; sauces, namely, soya sauce, pesto sauces, pasta sauce, ketchup, tomato sauce, mayonnaise sauce, barnaise sauce, tartar sauce, guacamole sauce; spices; ice. Grains and agricultural, horticultural and forestry products not include in other classes namely, unprocessed grains, agricultural grains for planting, live trees; seeds for agricultural purposes, seeds for horticultural purposes, crop seeds; live animals, live edible aquatic animals; fresh fruits and vegetables, fresh fruits, namely, berries, fresh fruits; fresh citrus fruit, vegetables, namely, fresh legumes, onions, fresh vegetables and root vegetables for food; natural plants and flowers; animal foodstuffs and animal foodstuffs, namely, dog biscuits; edible chews for animals; meal for animals; pet food; bird food; wheat germ for animal consumption; malt for brewing and distilling. Advertising; business management; business administration; office functions.


Trademark
Coop Italia | Date: 2015-12-15

Meat, fish, poultry and game, not live; meat extracts; frozen, preserved, dried and cooked fruits and vegetables and dried vegetables, namely, dried legumes; jellies, jams, compotes; eggs; milk and milk products excluding ice cream, ice milk and frozen yogurt; milk products, namely, cheese, cottage cheese, fresh unripened cheese, ripened cheese, powdered milk, and yogurt; edible oils and fats. Coffee, artificial coffee, tea, iced tea, cocoa, cocoa powder; rice; tapioca and sago; flour and preparations made from cereals, namely, breakfast cereals, cereal bars, granola bars, high protein cereal bars, and preparations made from processed cereal grains, namely, pasta; bread and bread in the nature of bread rolls, unleavened bread, bread crumbs and pita bread; pastry, namely, pastries, pastry dough, macaroons in the nature of pastry; confectionery, namely, candy bars, chocolate bars, chocolate confectionery, candy and ice cream cakes; ices and ices in the nature of ice cream; sugar, honey, treacle; yeast, baking-powder; salt; mustard; vinegar; sauces, namely, soya sauce, pesto sauces, pasta sauce, ketchup, tomato sauce, mayonnaise sauce, barnaise sauce, tartar sauce; spices; ice. Grains and agricultural, horticultural and forestry products not included in other classes, namely, unprocessed grains, agricultural grains for planting, trees; seeds for agricultural purposes, seeds for horticultural purposes, crop seeds; live animals, live edible aquatic animals; fresh fruits and vegetables, fresh fruits, namely, berries, fresh fruits; fresh citrus fruit, vegetables, namely, fresh legumes, onions, fresh vegetables and root vegetables for food; natural plants and flowers; animal foodstuffs and animal foodstuffs, namely, dog biscuits; edible chews for animals; meal for animals; pet food; bird food; wheat germ for animal consumption; malt for brewing and distilling. Beers; mineral and aerated waters and other non-alcoholic beverages, namely, alcohol-free beers, aerated water, flavored waters, seltzer water, soda water, sparkling water, spring water, still water, table water, mineral water, isotonic beverages, whey beverages, fruit-based beverages and carbonated fruit-based beverages, milk of almonds for beverages, tomato juice, vegetable juices, non-alcoholic aloe vera drinks, unfermented grape must, lithia water, sherbet beverages, smoothies, cola drinks, soft drinks flavored with chinotto, ginger ale; fruit beverages and juices; syrups and other preparations for making beverages, namely, pastilles for effervescing beverages and powders for effervescing beverages. Alcoholic beverages, except beer. Advertising; business management; business administration; office functions.


Trademark
Coop Italia | Date: 2016-01-05

Meat, fish, poultry and game, not live; meat extracts; frozen, preserved, dried and cooked fruits and vegetables and dried vegetables, namely, dried legumes; jellies, jams, compotes; eggs; milk and milk products excluding ice cream, ice milk and frozen yogurt; milk products, namely, cheese, cottage cheese, fresh unripened cheese, ripened cheese, powdered milk, and yogurt; edible oils and fats. Coffee, artificial coffee, tea, iced tea, cocoa, cocoa powder; rice; tapioca and sago; flour and preparations made from cereals, namely, breakfast cereals, cereal bars, granola bars, high protein cereal bars, and preparations made from processed cereal grains, namely, pasta; bread and bread in the nature of bread rolls, unleavened bread, bread crumbs and pita bread; pastry, namely, pastries, pastry dough, macaroons in the nature of pastry; confectionery, namely, candy bars, chocolate bars, chocolate confectionery, candy and ice cream cakes; ices and ices in the nature of ice cream; sugar, honey, treacle; yeast, baking-powder; salt; mustard; vinegar; sauces, namely, soya sauce, pesto sauces, pasta sauce, ketchup, tomato sauce, mayonnaise sauce, barnaise sauce, tartar sauce; spices; ice. Live edible aquatic animals; animal foodstuffs and animal foodstuffs, namely, dog biscuits; edible chews for animals; meal for animals; pet food; bird food; wheat germ for animal consumption; malt for brewing and distilling. Beers; mineral and aerated waters and other non-alcoholic beverages, namely, alcohol-free beers, aerated water, flavored waters, seltzer water, soda water, sparkling water, spring water, still water, table water, mineral water, isotonic beverages, whey beverages, fruit-based beverages and carbonated fruit-based beverages, milk of almonds for beverages, tomato juice, vegetable juices, non-alcoholic aloe vera drinks, unfermented grape must, lithia water, sherbet beverages, smoothies, cola drinks, soft drinks flavored with chinotto, ginger ale; fruit beverages and juices; syrups and other preparations for making non-alcoholic beverages, namely, pastilles for effervescing beverages and powders for effervescing beverages. Advertising; business management; business administration; office functions.

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