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Santa Fe, NM, United States

Lohse B.,Pennsylvania State University | Cunningham-Sabo L.,Colorado State University | Walters L.M.,Cooking with Kids Inc. | Stacey J.E.,Cooking with Kids Inc.
Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior | Year: 2011

Objective: To examine reliability of validity-tested instruments measuring fruit and vegetable (FV) preference and self-efficacy (SE) for and attitude (AT) toward cooking. Methods: In Santa Fe, New Mexico, following cognitive interviews with 123 fourth- and fifth-graders, surveys were administered twice, less than 2 weeks apart, to students in 16 classrooms without intervening nutrition education. Results were assessed using Pearson correlation coefficient, Cronbach α, marginal homogeneity, Wilcoxon, and paired t tests. Results: Individual test-retest scores were significantly (P < .001) correlated (n = 344; 72.9% Hispanic); r = 0.80 (SE), 0.82 (AT), and 0.88 (FV). Cronbach α was ≥ 0.74 for all survey administrations. Classroom test-retest scores were significantly correlated (SE r = 0.66, AT r = 0.88, and FV r = 0.92). Self-efficacy and AT toward cooking were higher in girls (P < .001). Conclusions and Implications: Validity-tested 8-item SE, 6-item AT, and 16-item FV surveys showed internal consistency and test-retest reliability and are suitable for impact assessment of cooking-based education interventions, specifically Cooking with Kids. © 2011 Society for Nutrition Education. Source


Walters L.M.,Cooking with Kids Inc. | Cunningham-Sabo L.,Colorado State University | Baker S.S.,Colorado State University
Journal of Extension | Year: 2011

Little research has been conducted to examine factors leading to adoption and implementation of nutrition education curricula. Data from two Web-based surveys (n = 313) and 27 interviews were used to explore how Diffusion of Innovations' perceived attributes contributed to adoption and implementation of Cooking with Kids (CWK) food and nutrition education curriculum. Results suggest programs that create or adapt nutrition education curricula for use in schools should emphasize experiential methods and ease of use to increase adoption and implementation. Perceived simplicity predicted intended use. Ensuring that users have adequate information and planning time to overcome barriers is essential. © by Extension Journal, Inc. Source


Diker A.,Metropolitan State University of Denver | Diker A.,Colorado State University | Cunningham-Sabo L.,Colorado State University | Bachman K.,New Mexico State University | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior | Year: 2013

Objective: Describe changes in Nutrition Educator (NE) and Extension Agent (EA) motivation, self-efficacy, and behavioral capability over time after experiential food tasting curriculum training. Identify promoters of curriculum adoption, implementation, and future use. Design: Mixed methods design including surveys, lesson implementation reports, and interviews. Setting: New Mexico limited-resource schools. Participants: Convenience sample of New Mexico Extension NE (n = 42) and their EA supervisors (n = 21). Intervention: Three-hour curriculum training employing Social Cognitive Theory and Diffusion of Innovations. Main Outcome Measures: Perceived change in motivation, self-efficacy, and behavioral capability from post-training through 8-month post-training; promoters and challenges to curriculum adoption, implementation, and future use. Analysis: Repeated-measures ANOVA analyzed perceived behavior change over time. Significance was set at P ≤ .05. Qualitative responses were categorized by theme. Results: Gains in NE motivation, self-efficacy, and behavioral capability were sustained at 8 months post-training. High adoption/implementation rates (79%) were attributed to strong implementation expectations, observational learning, experiential training elements, and perceived curriculum compatibility. Environmental factors including time constraints, personnel turnover, and scheduling conflicts proved challenging. Conclusions and Implications: Maximizing curriculum simplicity and compatibility and incorporating behavioral capability, observational learning, and expectations into training support adoption and use. Adaptations and techniques to problem-solve challenges should be provided to new curricula implementers. © 2013 . Source


Cunningham-Sabo L.,Colorado State University | Bachman K.,New Mexico State University | Stacey J.E.,Cooking with Kids Inc. | Walters L.M.,Cooking with Kids Inc. | Wells L.,New Mexico State University
Health Promotion Practice | Year: 2012

Effective nutrition education training should be guided by sound theory that specifically addresses behavior change. A 3-hour training was developed using diffusion of innovations (DOI) and social cognitive theories and formative assessment. Essential training components included interactive learning techniques and curriculum lesson practice. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze training satisfaction, paired samples t tests determined pre- to posttraining differences, and Pearson correlations and stepwise multiple regression were conducted to explore predictors of future curriculum use. Paraprofessional nutrition educators (NEs) and their supervisors rated the training high in acceptability, benefit, and clarity. NEs and supervisors improved knowledge about teaching the curriculum (t = 5.12, p < .01 and t = 8.31, p < .01, respectively), confidence (t = 3.93, p < .01 and t = 3.62, p < .01, respectively), motivation (t = 3.71, p < .01 and t = 2.63, p < .05, respectively), and information (t = 7.17, p < .01 and t = 4.15, p < .01, respectively) to teach the curriculum. The DOI attributes of relative advantage and trialability were correlated with intended future curriculum use by NEs (r = .577, p = .002 and r = .418, p = .027, respectively). Relative advantage was correlated with intended use by supervisors (r = .502, p = .040). These results underscore the importance of using both theory and formative assessment for successful training development. © 2012 Society for Public Health Education. Source

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