Consorzio Interuniversitario Reattivita Chimica e Catalisi

Bari, Italy

Consorzio Interuniversitario Reattivita Chimica e Catalisi

Bari, Italy
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Canossa S.,University of Parma | Bacchi A.,University of Parma | Graiff C.,University of Parma | Graiff C.,Consorzio Interuniversitario Reattivita Chimica e Catalisi | And 7 more authors.
Inorganic Chemistry | Year: 2017

The aromatic methylene blue cation (MB+) shows unprecedented ligand behavior in the X-ray structures of the trigonal-planar (TP) complexes MBMCl2 (M = CuI, AgI). The two isostructural compounds were exclusively synthesized by grinding together methylene blue chloride and MCl solids. Only in the case of AuCl did the technique lead to a different, yet isoformular, AuI derivative with separated MB+ and AuCl2 - counterions and no direct N-Au linkage. While the density functional theory (DFT) molecular modeling failed in reproducing the isolated Cu and Ag complexes, the solid-state program CRYSTAL satisfactorily provided for Cu the correct TP building block associated with a highly compact π stacking of the MB+ ligands. In this respect, the dispersion interactions, evaluated with the DFT functional, provide to the system an extra energy, which likely supports the unprecedented metal coordination of the MB+ cation. The feature seems governed by subtle chemical factors, such as, for instance, the selected metal ion of the coinage triad. Thus, the electronically consistent AuI ion does not form the analogous TP building block because of a looser supramolecular arrangement. In conclusion, while a given crystalline design is generally fixed by the nature of the building block, a peculiarly efficient supramolecular packing may stabilize an otherwise unattainable metal complex. © 2017 American Chemical Society.


Rosi L.,University of Florence | Rosi L.,Consorzio Interuniversitario Reattivita Chimica e Catalisi | Bartoli M.,University of Florence | Frediani M.,University of Florence | Frediani M.,Consorzio Interuniversitario Reattivita Chimica e Catalisi
Waste Management | Year: 2017

Microwave Assisted Pyrolysis (MAP) of the plastic fraction of Waste from Electric and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) from end-life computers was run with different absorbers and set-ups in a multimode batch reactor. A large amount of various different liquid fractions (up to 76.6wt%) were formed together with a remarkable reduction of the solid residue (up to 14.2wt%). The liquid fractions were characterized using the following different techniques: FT-IR ATR, 1H NMR and a quantitative GC-MS analysis. The liquid fractions showed low density and viscosity, together with a high concentration of useful chemicals such as styrene (up to 117.7mg/mL), xylenes (up to 25.6mg/mL for p-xylene) whereas halogenated compounds were absent or present in a very low amounts. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd.


Canossa S.,University of Parma | Belle E.,University of Parma | Delferro M.,Argonne National Laboratory | Predieri G.,Consorzio Interuniversitario Reattivita Chimica e Catalisi | Graiff C.,Consorzio Interuniversitario Reattivita Chimica e Catalisi
Inorganica Chimica Acta | Year: 2017

Cu(II) cations in the presence of diamine ligands such as tetramethylethylendiamine (TMEDA) react with Na2SeO3 to produce the heteroleptic selenite copper compound of formula [Cu3(TMEDA)3(SeO3)2(H2O)4](NO3)2. In the cationic moiety two copper atoms are linked by two selenite anions through the O-Se-O bridge. One of the two bridging selenite anion coordinates to a third copper atom through the third oxygen atom. Reaction of Cd(CH3COO)2·2H2O with Na2SeO3 in the presence of ligand with softer character such as thiourea [(NH2)2CS; tu] or selenourea [(NH2)2CSe; tu] in aqueous solution afforded the complex [(Cd(tu)2SeO3)2], whose structure has been elucidated by X-ray diffraction analysis. It is the first reported example of a molecular cadmium selenite complex. Two cadmium cations stabilized by the coordination of four ancillary thiourea soft ligands, are linked together by two bridging selenite ions through O and O-Se-O bridges. A comparison between the coordination mode of the selenite ion in those cadmium and copper complexes and in inorganic extended CdSeO3 and hydrated CuSeO3 phases is also reported. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.


Rotundo L.,University of Turin | Garino C.,University of Turin | Gobetto R.,Consorzio Interuniversitario Reattivita Chimica e Catalisi | Nervi C.,Consorzio Interuniversitario Reattivita Chimica e Catalisi
Inorganica Chimica Acta | Year: 2017

Quantum mechanical calculations on W(CO)4(4,6-diphenyl-2,2'-bipyridine) (1) and on W(CO)4(2,2'-dipyridylamine) (2) were performed with the aim to shed light on the nature of the electrochemical behaviour previously observed under Ar. DFT confirmed the stability of 1 after 1e reduction, showing agreement between IR-SEC (spectroelectrochemical) data and computed IR frequencies. It has been found that the nature of the electrochemical irreversible behaviour of 2 after 1e reduction is due to a geometry rearrangement in which a single pyridine ring is rotated. In long time scale of the IR-SEC a proton loss accounts for the observed IR spectra. Under CO2 a mechanism of conversion to CO and carbonate ions are herein proposed, and the corresponding transition states individuated. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.


Aresta M.,National University of Singapore | Aresta M.,Consorzio Interuniversitario Reattivita Chimica e Catalisi | Dibenedetto A.,Consorzio Interuniversitario Reattivita Chimica e Catalisi | Dibenedetto A.,University of Bari
Journal of the Brazilian Chemical Society | Year: 2014

The need for a better carbon management and the reduction of CO2 emissions push away from the linear-carbon economy (LCE) towards a better carbon management including carbon recycling (CR). This implies the utilization of gaseous and liquid process streams so far under-utilized, and often either sent to combustion or disposed of. In this paper, four cases are discussed, namely: low-alkane streams, industrial CO2, ligno-cellulosic waste and salty-watery-glycerol. The role of catalysis in the valorization of such C-sources is discussed and examples of innovative processes are presented. ©2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Química.


Dibenedetto A.,University of Bari | Dibenedetto A.,Consorzio Interuniversitario Reattivita Chimica e Catalisi | Colucci A.,Consorzio Interuniversitario Reattivita Chimica e Catalisi | Aresta M.,National University of Singapore
Environmental Science and Pollution Research | Year: 2016

In the present work, microalgae strains, such as Scenedesmus obliquus and Phaeodactylum tricornutum grown in indoor/outdoor photobioreactors (PBRs) and in open ponds (this is the first study on such strains cultivated in the local Southern Italy climatic conditions), were fully analyzed for their protein content, carbohydrates, lipids, and fatty acid profile in order to assess their potential use for the production of biofuels, chemicals, and omega-3, and as animal feed and human food. They are compared with Nannochloropsis sp. (commercial sample) which was fully analyzed in our laboratory and Chlorella (literature data). An economic evaluation was carried out, demonstrating that the cultivation of microalgae for the production of only biofuels will not match the economic standards. Conversely, if chemicals are also produced applying the biorefinery concept and using wastewater as a source of nutrients, it will be possible to have a good positive return from microalgae. © 2016 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg


PubMed | National University of Singapore, Consorzio Interuniversitario Reattivita Chimica e Catalisi and University of Bari
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Environmental science and pollution research international | Year: 2016

In the present work, microalgae strains, such as Scenedesmus obliquus and Phaeodactylum tricornutum grown in indoor/outdoor photobioreactors (PBRs) and in open ponds (this is the first study on such strains cultivated in the local Southern Italy climatic conditions), were fully analyzed for their protein content, carbohydrates, lipids, and fatty acid profile in order to assess their potential use for the production of biofuels, chemicals, and omega-3, and as animal feed and human food. They are compared with Nannochloropsis sp. (commercial sample) which was fully analyzed in our laboratory and Chlorella (literature data). An economic evaluation was carried out, demonstrating that the cultivation of microalgae for the production of only biofuels will not match the economic standards. Conversely, if chemicals are also produced applying the biorefinery concept and using wastewater as a source of nutrients, it will be possible to have a good positive return from microalgae.


Aresta M.,Consorzio Interuniversitario Reattivita Chimica e Catalisi | Acquaviva M.I.,CNR Institute of Neuroscience | Baruzzi F.,CNR Institute of Sciences of Food Production | Noce R.M.L.,CNR Institute of Neuroscience | And 4 more authors.
World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology | Year: 2010

In this study 28 bacterial strains, isolated from greenwaters-polluted-soil, were investigated for their ability to grow in presence of phenols added to Mineral Basal Medium (MBM) in aerobic conditions. In particular, three of them were found to be able to use as sole carbon source phenol, cathecol, caffeic acid and ferulic acid with efficiency ranging from 76% (phenol in 5 days, millimolar concentration from 3.7 10-2 to 9 10-3) to 95% (ferulic acid in 2 days millimolar concentration from 6.8 10-1 to 3 10-2). For these strains the taxonomic position was studied by amplification and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The isolated strains were classified belonging to Arthrobacter sulfureus, Pseudomonas synxantha and Pseudomonas oryzihabitans. Noteworthy, for the first time such Pseudomonas strains have been shown to be able to use polyphenols as the only carbon source in vitro. In fact, to the best of our knowledge, this kind of study were not done on Ps. Synxantha, while it was recently shown the ability of P. oryzihabitans to degrade catechol. These findings may open to new biotechnological applications for the degradation of polyphenols. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


Pavarelli G.,University of Bologna | Velasquez Ochoa J.,University of Bologna | Caldarelli A.,University of Bologna | Puzzo F.,University of Bologna | And 3 more authors.
ChemSusChem | Year: 2015

We investigated the synthesis of maleic anhydride by oxidehydration of a bio-alcohol, 1-butanol, as a possible alternative to the classical process of n-butane oxidation. A vanadyl pyrophosphate catalyst was used to explore the one-pot reaction, which involved two sequential steps: 1)1-butanol dehydration to 1-butene, catalysed by acid sites, and 2)the oxidation of butenes to maleic anhydride, catalysed by redox sites. A non-negligible amount of phthalic anhydride was also formed. The effect of different experimental parameters was investigated with chemically sourced 1-butanol, and the results were then confirmed by using genuinely bio-sourced 1-butanol. In the case of bio-1-butanol, however, the purity of the product remarkably affected the yield of maleic anhydride. It was found that the reaction mechanism includes the oxidation of butenes to crotonaldehyde and the oxidation of the latter to either furan or maleic acid, both of which are transformed to produce maleic anhydride. MA and PA together: Maleic anhydride (MA) can be produced by the one-pot oxidehydration of bio-1-butanol with a vanadyl pyrophosphate catalyst. The reaction mechanism includes the oxidation of butenes to crotonaldehyde and the oxidation of the latter to either furan or maleic acid, both of which are transformed to produce maleic anhydride. © 2015 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.


Quaranta E.,University of Bari | Quaranta E.,Centro Interdipartimentale Of Ricerca Su Metodologie E Tecnologie Ambientali Metea | Quaranta E.,Consorzio Interuniversitario Reattivita Chimica e Catalisi | Angelini A.,Consorzio Interuniversitario Reattivita Chimica e Catalisi | And 3 more authors.
ACS Catalysis | Year: 2014

Polymer-bound DBU (PS-DBU, DBU = 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene) is an effective and selective catalyst for solventless N-phenoxycarbonylation of N-heteroaromatics (pyrrole (1), indole (2), and carbazole (3)) with diphenyl carbonate (DPC), used as an eco-friendly active carbonyl species in place of phosgene-derivatives. The immobilized catalyst is less active than unsupported DBU but can be recovered easily at the end of catalytic run and recycled effectively. Dedicated studies have demonstrated that DBU can react as a nucleophile with DPC even when it is anchored on the polymeric matrix, and provided the first direct evidence (FTIR and solid-state 13C NMR) of formation of a 8-carboxy-substituted 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-enium cation in DBU-promoted nucleophilic activation of carbonic acid diesters. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

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