Consell Insular de Menorca

Menorca, Spain

Consell Insular de Menorca

Menorca, Spain

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Euphorbia nurae P. Fraga & Rosselló (Euphorbiaceae sect. Cymatospermum (Prokh.) Prokh.) is described as a new species from coastal sites of Minorca (Balearic Islands). Morphological features suggest that Euphorbia exigua L., Euphorbia dracunculoides Lam. and Euphorbia sulcata Loisel. are the most closely related taxa, but the new species can be easily discriminated by several morphological characters. © 2011 Conservatoire et Jardin Botaniques de Genève.


Pujadas-Salva A.J.,University of Cordoba, Spain | Arguimbau P.F.I.,Consell Insular de Menorca
Candollea | Year: 2012

A new species, Orobanche rumseiana A. Pujadas & P. Fraga (subgen. Trionychon (Wallr.) Spach, Orobanchaceae) is described from Majorca and Minorca, Balearic Islands. The new species inhabits coastal rocky areas with shrubby vegetation, is parasitic on Rosmarinus officinalis L. It is characterised by an inflorescence with erect-patent to patent flowers, a calyx with long acuminate triangular teeths, a corolla tube uniformly curved, corolla lobes obtuse with a distinctive mucro, some staminal filaments pubescent in the lower half and hairy anthers. Its morphological traits, and the fact that it is a parasite of Rosmarinus officinalis L., relate it to Orobanche rosmarina Beck with which it has been misidentified. It is also related to Orobanche mariana A. Pujadas and Orobanche pseudrosmarina A. Pujadas & Muñoz Garm. A detailed description and diagnosis are provided. Morphological characters that allow it to be discriminated from these related taxa are discussed and summarized. © CONSERVATOIRE ET JARDIN BOTANIQUES DE GENÈVE 2012.


Podda L.,Criteria S.r.l. | Fraga I Arguimbau P.,Consell Insular de Menorca | Mascia F.,University of Cagliari | Mayoral Garcia-Berlanga O.,Polytechnic University of Valencia | And 2 more authors.
Rendiconti Lincei | Year: 2011

This article provides a comparison of the invasive vascular flora of Sardinia and that of the Balearic Islands. The study has recorded 53 invasive taxa in Sardinia (12% of the alien flora) while 48 (14%) in the Balearic Islands, 19 of them common for both territories. The invasive flora of Sardinia is included in 18 families; Asteraceae is the richest in taxa, followed by Amaranthaceae, while in the Balearic Islands in 19 families, with a predominance of Poaceae and Asteraceae. The comparison of the biological spectrum reveals that in Sardinia therophytes and phanerophytes are the most represented, as well as therophytes and hemicryptophytes are in the Balearic Islands. Neophytes are clearly dominant comparing to archaeophytes. A study of the geographical origin shows supremacy of the American element. The majority of invasive taxa is a result of intentional human introductions, mainly for ornamental use. The most occupied habitats in both territories are the semi-natural, agricultural and synanthropic for both territories, followed by natural habitats as coastal ones in Sardinia and wetlands in the Balearic Islands. An important part of the work deals with the environmental, economic and human-health impact. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.


Pericas J.,Institute Menorqui DEstudis | Fraga P.,Institute Menorqui DEstudis | Mascaro J.,Consell Insular de Menorca | Rossello J.A.,University of Valencia
Flora Montiberica | Year: 2016

New records for several unknown and rare bryophyte species from Minorca are here reported The following species Fossombronia caespitiformis subsp. multispira, Mannia androgyna, Oxymitra incrassata, Riccia crinita, R. nigrella, Acaulon mediterraneum, A. triquetrum, Brachytheciastrum velutinum, Bryum pseudotriquetrum, B. rubens, Campylopus introflexus, Drepanocladus aduncus, Ephemerum recurvifolium, Grimmia tergestina, Gymnostomum calcareum var. lanceolatum, G. viridulum, Habrodon perpusillus, Microbryum curvicollum, Orthotrichum tenellum, Pleuridium acuminatum, Pterogonium gracile, and Tortula atrovirens are new records for the flora of Minorca. The distribution area of other taxa in the island is enlarged.


Podda L.,University of Cagliari | Arguimbau P.F.,Consell Insular de Menorca | Garcia-Berlanga O.M.,Polytechnic University of Valencia | Garcia-Berlanga O.M.,University of Valencia | And 2 more authors.
Anales del Jardin Botanico de Madrid | Year: 2010

This paper provides a comparison of the vascular exotic flora of Sardinia and that of the Balearic Islands, both territories belonging to the Western Mediterranean biogeographic subregion. The study has recorded 531 exotic taxa in Sardinia (18.8% of the total flora) while 360 (19%) in the Balearic Islands; 10 are new to Sardinia (3 of which for Italy) and 29 to the Balearic Islands. The alien flora of Sardinia is included in 99 families; Fabaceae is the richest (49 taxa), followed by Poaceae (33) and Asteraceae (31) while in the Balearic Islands in 90 families, with a predominance of Fabaceae (32), Asteraceae (31) and Poaceae (27). The comparison of the biological spectra reveals that in Sardinia phanerophytes are the most represented in Sardinia and therophytes in the Balearic Islands. A detailed analysis shows that most of the exotic taxa (246) are shared by both territories with a clear dominance of neophytes rather than archaeophytes. A study of the geographical origin shows supremacy of the American element over the Mediterranean. The majority of introduced exotic taxa are a result of intentional human introductions (76% SA, 77% BL), mainly for ornamental use (43% SA, 45% BL). The most occupied habitats are the semi-natural, agricultural and synanthropic for both territories, but attending to invasive plants, coastal habitats in Sardinia and wetlands in the Balearic Islands are the most sensitive. A part of the work deals with the causes of fragility and low resilience of the different habitats.


Sales M.,CSIC - Center for Advanced Studies of Blanes | Sales M.,Spanish Institute of Oceanography | Ballesteros E.,CSIC - Center for Advanced Studies of Blanes | Anderson M.J.,Massey University | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Biogeography | Year: 2012

Aim The aim of this study was to describe the composition, community structure and biogeographical variation of subtidal algal assemblages dominated by the brown alga Cystoseira crinita across the Mediterranean Sea. Location The Mediterranean coast, from Spain (1°25'E) to Turkey (30°26'E). Methods Data on the species composition and structure of assemblages dominated by the species C. crinita were collected from 101 sites in nine regions across the Mediterranean Sea. Multivariate and univariate statistical tools were used to investigate patterns of variation in the composition of the assemblages among sites and regions, and to compare these with previously defined biogeographical regions. Linear regressions of species richness versus longitude and versus latitude were also carried out to test previously formulated hypotheses of biodiversity gradients in the Mediterranean Sea. Results The main features characterizing C. crinita-dominated assemblages across the Mediterranean included a similar total cover of species, a similar cover of C. crinita, and consistency in the presence of the epiphyte Haliptilon virgatum. Biogeographical variation was detected as shifts in relative abundances of species among regions, partly coinciding with previously described biogeographical sectors. A significant positive correlation was found between species richness and latitude, while no significant correlation was detected between species richness and longitude. Main conclusions The patterns of variation in community structure detected among the studied regions reflected their geographical positions quite well. However, latitude seemed to contribute more to the explanation of biological patterns of diversity than did geographical distances or boundaries, which classically have been used to delimit biogeographical sectors. Moreover, the positive correlation between species richness and latitude reinforced the idea that latitude, and possibly temperature as a related environmental factor, plays a primary role in structuring biogeographical patterns in the Mediterranean Sea. The lack of correlation between species richness and longitude contradicts the notion that there is a decrease in species richness from west to east in the Mediterranean, following the direction of species colonization from the Atlantic. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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