State College, OK, United States
State College, OK, United States

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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools, a leading resource provider for higher education information, has selected Oklahoma’s best online colleges and universities for 2017. Based on an analysis of government-supplied data, 23 four-year schools are honored, with University of Oklahoma Norman Campus, Oral Roberts University, Oklahoma State University, University of Tulsa and University of Central Oklahoma taking the top five. 12 two-year colleges are also recognized, with Tulsa Community College, Northern Oklahoma College, Murray State College, Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College and Rose State College coming in as the top five. “Students in Oklahoma have a lot of options when it comes to earning a certificate or degree, but the schools on our list have distinguished themselves as being the best of the best when it comes to online education,” said Doug Jones, CEO and founder of AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org. “In addition to providing exceptional learning opportunities, these schools also provide outstanding academic resources for online students.” To earn a spot on the Community for Accredited Online Schools list, colleges and universities must be accredited, public or private not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also judged based on data points such as financial aid availability, student resources, counseling services, student/teacher ratios and graduation rates. For more details on where each school falls in the rankings and the data and methodology used to determine the lists, visit: The Best Online Four-Year Schools in Oklahoma for 2017 include the following: Cameron University East Central University Langston University Mid-America Christian University Northeastern State University Northwestern Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Baptist University Oklahoma Christian University Oklahoma City University Oklahoma Panhandle State University Oklahoma State University-Main Campus Oklahoma Wesleyan University Oral Roberts University Randall University Rogers State University Southeastern Oklahoma State University Southern Nazarene University Southwestern Christian University Southwestern Oklahoma State University University of Central Oklahoma University of Oklahoma-Health Sciences Center University of Oklahoma-Norman Campus University of Tulsa The Best Online Two-Year Schools in Oklahoma for 2017 include the following: Carl Albert State College Connors State College Eastern Oklahoma State College Murray State College Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College Northern Oklahoma College Oklahoma City Community College Redlands Community College Rose State College Seminole State College Tulsa Community College Western Oklahoma State College ### About Us: AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable, quality education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has released its list of Oklahoma’s best colleges and universities for 2017. Of the 26 four-year schools that made the list, Oklahoma City University, University of Tulsa, University of Oklahoma Norman Campus, Oklahoma State University and Oklahoma Christian University ranked as the top five. Of the 14 two-year schools that were also included, Tulsa Community College, Western Oklahoma State College, Northern Oklahoma College, Rose State College and Murray State College were the top five. A list of all schools is included below. “A strong economy begins with a strong workforce, and these Oklahoma schools have shown that they offer a high-caliber education that sets graduates up for success in the job market after graduation,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.org. To be included on Oklahoma’s “Best Colleges” list, schools must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also scored on additional metrics that includes the number of career and academic resources available, annual alumni earnings 10 years after entering college, financial aid, student/teacher ratios and graduation rates. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in Oklahoma” list, visit: Oklahoma’s Best Four-Year Colleges for 2017 include: Bacone College Cameron University East Central University Langston University Mid-America Christian University Northeastern State University Northwestern Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Baptist University Oklahoma Christian University Oklahoma City University Oklahoma Panhandle State University Oklahoma State University-Main Campus Oklahoma Wesleyan University Oral Roberts University Randall University Rogers State University Southeastern Oklahoma State University Southern Nazarene University Southwestern Christian University Southwestern Oklahoma State University St. Gregory’s University University of Central Oklahoma University of Oklahoma-Health Sciences Center University of Oklahoma-Norman Campus University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma University of Tulsa Oklahoma’s Best Two-Year Colleges for 2017 include: Carl Albert State College College of the Muscogee Nation Comanche Nation College Connors State College Eastern Oklahoma State College Murray State College Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College Northern Oklahoma College Oklahoma City Community College Redlands Community College Rose State College Seminole State College Tulsa Community College Western Oklahoma State College ### About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


Smith M.P.,Oklahoma State University | Smith A.L.,Oklahoma State University | Kard B.,Oklahoma State University | Brown K.S.,BASF | Broussard G.H.,Connors State College
American Midland Naturalist | Year: 2012

A study was conducted to characterize termite colonies on the Nature Conservancy's Tallgrass Prairie Preserve Cross Timbers habitat in northeastern Oklahoma. The two test sites were established on a prescribed-burn area and no-burn area of the Cross Timbers habitat. Termites were identified through both morphological and molecular analyses. Foraging areas of five colonies were delineated. Numbers of termites in foraging groups, estimated using the 'weighted mean model', ranged from 103,093 (±7081) to 422,780 (±19,297) for Reticulitermes flavipes within the prescribed-burn area, and 44,179 (±4879) to 207,141 (±9190) for R. hageni within the no-burn area. Soldier percentages were determined for each foraging group. Estimates of foraging areas and populations are compared with those from previous studies in dissimilar tallgrass prairie habitats. Improved understanding of termite colony densities in various natural habitats provides an increased understanding of termite input in rural areas and could aid in the development of management strategies. © 2012, American Midland Naturalist.


Paulissen M.A.,Northeastern State University | Meyer H.A.,Mcneese State University | Hibbs T.S.,Connors State College
Western North American Naturalist | Year: 2014

We captured and marked Mediterranean geckos, Hemidactylus turcicus, occupying a one-story building in southwestern Louisiana in 1999-2000 and 2002-2005 and calculated 2 estimates of growth rate: length growth rate (difference in snout-vent length [SVL] between captures divided by time between captures) and mass growth rate (difference in gecko mass between captures divided by time between captures). Both length growth rate and mass growth rate were significantly negatively correlated with gecko snout-vent length. When data from all years were combined, adult female geckos showed greater mean length growth rates and mean mass growth rates than males, but the trend was not statistically significant. Length growth rate and mass growth rate varied dramatically between years; neither correlated with yearly differences in rainfall. Comparison of our results to studies done in Texas and Florida showed that Mediterranean geckos in Louisiana had the lowest mean length growth rates and a much wider range of variation.© 2014.


Paulissen M.A.,Northeastern State University | Meyer H.A.,Mcneese State University | Hibbs T.S.,Connors State College
Southwestern Naturalist | Year: 2013

The Mediterranean gecko, Hemidactylus turcicus, is a nonnative lizard that lives on buildings and other artificial structures in the southern United States. Previous studies have shown that geckos rarely move from one building to another and that, when they do, it is usually due to juveniles dispersing to new buildings. Little is known about the movements of geckos on the buildings they occupy or about the degree to which males and females or adults and juveniles associate with each other during their nocturnal activity periods. We used data from a multi-year, mark-recapture study of a population of Mediterranean geckos on a one-story building in southwestern Louisiana to analyze movements of geckos between recaptures and to analyze age and sex of pairs of geckos. The distance moved by adult geckos between recaptures was usually small (<5 m) regardless of whether the time between recaptures was <30 days, >30 days within a year, or in succeeding years. There was no difference in patterns of movement between adult males and adult females. Occasionally, adult geckos did make long-distance movements of ≥18 m, but these were often followed by movements back to their starting point. Juvenile geckos generally moved greater distances between recaptures than did adults, perhaps as a means of dispersal to a new area on the building. Juvenile geckos were associated with adult geckos in pairs less frequently than expected whereas the number of same-sex and different-sex pairs of adults did not differ from expectations if males and females associated randomly. Overall, the results present a picture of juveniles moving long distances, perhaps to escape contacts with adults, but typically remaining in their home areas for months or years once they become adults.

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