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Sarukhan J.,National Commission for Knowledge | Urquiza-Haas T.,CONABIO | Koleff P.,CONABIO | Carabias J.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | And 4 more authors.
BioScience | Year: 2015

Decisionmakers need updated, scientifically sound and relevant information to implement appropriate policy measures and make innovative commitments to halt biodiversity loss and improve human well-being. Here, we present a recent science-based synthesis on the biodiversity and ecosystem services of Mexico, intended to be a tool for policymakers. We describe the methodological approach used to undertake such an assessment and highlight the major findings. Organized into five volumes and originally written in Spanish (Capital Natural de México), it summarizes the available knowledge on the components, structure, and functioning of the biodiversity of Mexico; the threats and trajectories of anthropogenic impact, together with its conservation status; and the policies, institutions, and instruments available for its sustainable management. We stress the lessons learned that can be useful for similar exercises in other megadiverse developing countries and identify major gaps and strategic actions to conserve the natural capital in light of the challenges of the Anthropocene. © 2014 The Author(s).


News Article | November 29, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

One of the world's leading botanical science research institutions, the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, is celebrating 15 years of partnerships aimed at protecting Mexico's biodiversity during this year's Convention on Biological Diversity Conference of the Parties, CBD-COP13, in Cancun from Dec 2-17th. RBG Kew has been in partnerships in Mexico since 2002, principally with the country's largest wild plant seed bank at the Faculty of Higher Studies of Iztacala, part of the Autonomous National University of Mexico (UNAM) and CONABIO (The National Commission for Knowledge and Use of Biodiversity). To date, the collaboration has resulted in 7% of Mexico's flora being safeguarded in the Seed Bank at FESI-UNAM, each with a duplicate collection also held at Kew's Millennium Seed Bank in the UK - the largest off site plant conservation programme in the world. This equates to 986 Mexican plant species duplicated at Kew's MSB. On December 2nd at the Business Forum in Cancun, Kew will sign a new agreement with the Mexican Fund for the Conservation of Nature (FMCN) and HSBC Mexico to support a two year project focussing on arid areas in Baja California which are threatened with habitat loss, climate change and invasive species. Kew's Director of Science, Prof. Kathy Willis, who will be addressing businesses on December 3rd on some of the ways in which they can contribute to global efforts to tackle threats to biodiversity, especially from agriculture, says; "Mexico is the fifth most mega biodiverse country in the world. It is facing pressures on its ecosystems from agriculture, forestry, fisheries and tourism, leading to rapidly changing land use. We're starting to see some very tangible results from the work we have been doing here for over a decade and we're proud that Kew's world class science and expertise is helping to inform some of the big environmental decisions about what to prioritise and where in order to ensure sustainable ecosystems in the future. We are committed to our existing partnerships and are exploring new ones so we can collectively buck the trends and foster greater collective responsibility for the solutions to the biggest challenges facing our planet." Solutions include field identification and collection of the wild relatives of commonly used crops that could hold the key to future food supplies in areas under threat of climate change. Some of these plant species which will be stored in Mexico's seed bank may represent sources of new genetic diversity and will potentially be available for plant breeding experiments, contributing to a wide range of beneficial agronomic and nutritional traits. Kew is also just beginning a four year Tree Project in Mexico that aims to conserve seeds from approximately 300 priority tree species nationally, including endemic, protected and useful plants important for the livelihoods of rural communities. Outputs from this project will also include a database of tree species and a map of tree species 'biodiversity hotspots'. Both will be critical assets when 'modelling' the actual and potential distribution of these important tree species under a changing climate. China Williams, Senior Science Officer, RBG Kew will be participating in the Science Forum in Cancun and on the UK Delegation at the CBD. Kew's Director of External Affairs. David Cope, Director of External Affairs, RBG Kew will be hosting a side event at the CEPA Fair which hopes to foster a lively discussion with representatives from several other botanic gardens about the wider role they play in communicating, educating and raising public awareness of biodiversity. For more information, images or to book an interview with a Kew spokesperson, please contact Ciara O'Sullivan, Head of Media Relations c.osullivan@kew.org and Tel: + 44 7753 10 34 60. In Cancun 30/11 to 5/12 1-2 Dec: 3rd Science for Biodiversity Forum More details China Williams, Senior Science Officer speaking on panel. Available for interview. 3 Dec: 14:15-16:15, 2016 Business and Biodiversity Forum, More details (CBD website). Kathy Willis, Director on Science speaking on Panel. Available for interview. Session G: Agriculture - negative impact of current agricultural practices on ecosystems and biodiversity. Business opportunities and challenges. 5 Dec: 13.15, Experiences in Tourism and Biodiversity. Contact Group 3 Meeting Room at the Universal Building. David Cope, Director of External Affairs is a panellist on this event organised between the British Embassy in Mexico and the Mexican Ministry of Tourism 6 Dec: 15:30, Kew's CEPA Side Event More details Venue: Universal Building (Moon Palace Hotel, Main Floor). Title: 'Gardens of the Anthropocene: How botanic gardens are reconnecting people with plants'. Topic: A panel of experts from botanic gardens and universities across the globe will discuss the role of botanical gardens in communicating, educating and raising public awareness of biodiversity. The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew is a world famous scientific organisation, internationally respected for its outstanding collections as well as its scientific expertise in plant diversity, conservation and sustainable development in the UK and around the world. In May 2016 Kew released the first ever State of the World's Plants report which will now be an annual report tracking progress and scanning the horizons on issues ranging from useful plants to illegal trade and agreements like the Nagoya Protocol being discussed in Cancun in December.Wakehurst is home to Kew's Millennium Seed Bank, the largest wild plant seed bank in the world. Kew receives approximately just under half of its funding from the UK Government through the Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra). The Kew Foundation charity raises much needed funds from individuals, companies and trusts to support Kew's work. For further information visit our website. Professor Kathy Willis, Director of Science, RBG Kew (Cancun, Dec 1-3): Kathy was appointed in November 2013 to lead Kew's Science Directorate, and the development of a new Science Strategy for Kew which enhances its world-leading science and conservation work, strengthens its position as a global resource for plant and fungal knowledge, and promotes plant and fungal-based solutions to current global challenges. Kathy's career began with a degree in Environmental Science from the University of Southampton and was followed by a PhD in from the University of Cambridge. Kathy remained at Cambridge in the Department of Plant Sciences for her early postdoctoral career, obtaining fellowships with Selwyn College, NERC and the Royal Society, before moving to the University of Oxford in 1999 to take up a lectureship in the School of Geography and the Environment. While in this role she established the Oxford Long-term Ecology Laboratory in 2002, and was made Professor of Long-term Ecology in 2008. Kathy became Professor of Biodiversity in the Department of Zoology, University of Oxford in 2010 and maintains this position and an adjunct Professorship in Biology at the University of Bergen.Kathy's research interests focus on the relationship between long-term vegetation dynamics and environmental change, with current projects examining biodiversity baselines and processes responsible for ecosystem thresholds and resilience. Recent work has also focused on the development of technologies to measure and derive economic and ecological values for biodiversity. Julia Willison, Head of Learning and Participation, RBG Kew: Julia Willison has over 20 years' experience of working with botanic gardens around the world, supporting them to develop their education programmes. Julia leads Kew's Learning and Participation Programme which includes the schools programme, visitor learning (families, guides and participation) and Grow Wild, a UK-wide programme inspiring people to transform local spaces with native wild flowers. Her professional interests lie in how we engage people of all ages and backgrounds in understanding the importance of plants in our lives and how our decisions and behaviours impact the sustainability of the planet. Julia is the originator of 'Communities in Nature: Growing the Social Role of Botanic Gardens', an international initiative supporting botanic gardens to work with their local communities on common issues of social and environmental importance and she also co-led INQUIRE, a pan-European project aiming to reinvigorate inquiry-based science education in formal and informal education systems. David Cope, Director of Strategy and External Affairs, RBG Kew: David is responsible for building Kew's external reputation and relationships across all our stakeholders, facilitating changes to strategic plans, and ensuring the effective governance of Kew. David joined Kew after eight years working in a variety of change management, strategy, analysis, performance improvement and policy roles in the UK Government department for the Environment Defra and the Home Office. David trained as a biologist, conducting his PhD and postdoctoral research on the population dynamics and conservation of herbivores. David aims to bring his passion for science and conservation along with his developed knowledge of strategy formulation and implementation and his understanding of the workings of government in order to support Kew in achieving its potential to make an even greater positive impact in the world. China Williams, Senior Science Officer (Science Policy), RBG Kew: China's role focuses on ensuring that Kew staff comply with the Convention on Biological Diversity, the Nagoya Protocol on Access to Genetic Resources, as well as the national laws of our partner countries. This involves supporting Kew staff preparing for overseas collecting trips, developing legal agreements with partners, and making sure that policies in all research areas ensure that we are using material legally. In addition China represents Kew at national and international meetings and work with the UK government so that Kew's breadth of science knowledge is used to guide policy decisions. China has developed and delivers a range of policy training modules for Kew staff, partners, others in the non-commercial research sector and also at the graduate and post graduate level. Alison Purvis, Co-CEO (interim), Kew Foundation: Alison brings years over 15 years of experience in philanthropic, institutional and corporate strategy and International NGO development work to support Kew's mission to unlock why plants mater. The Kew Foundation was named the second fasted growing charity by income in the UK by Cass Business School in February 2016 and Alison has expert knowledge of non-profit fundraising within complex, global and scientific research organisations working in over 100 countries with public, scientific and educational objectives. Alison is a FRSA and holds her BA from St Lawrence University in New York and recently completed the PMNO course at the Harvard Kennedy School. She has resided in London with her husband and son for 15 years.


News Article | December 7, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

In an effort to connect critical links between needs, opportunity and action, international organizations are coming together to identify opportunities to increase agricultural production while protecting natural resources with the launch of Solution Search. This global crowd-sourcing competition, launched today, is designed to spotlight the most promising approaches to conservation and development challenges. This year’s contest aims to focus on biodiversity-friendly resource solutions within the agricultural sector. Solution Search: Farming for Biodiversity, seeks entries that showcase innovative solutions in sustainable farming, while promoting behaviors that strengthen biodiversity across the agricultural sector. This theme is part of an overarching initiative of the Convention on Biological Diversity, and a focus of this year’s 13th annual Conference of Parties (COP) which aims to shine a spotlight on the critical need for cross-cutting conservation solutions across political, economic, and social spheres. "Solution Search is an online prize competition designed to crowdsource solutions to pressing conservation and human development challenges,” says Brett Jenks, President and CEO of Rare. “Practitioners are creating great solutions all over the world, but they rarely write them up or share them, so they almost never get replicated, much less scaled.” The contest will run in direct partnership with IFOAM-Organics International, with additional partners Convention on Biological Diversity Secretariat, Save the Children, Blue Solutions, the Global Island Partnership, and Panorama, joining from across the globe. “Organic farmers have been showing us for years that it is possible to nourish soils, grow nutritious food and safeguard biodiversity,” says André Leu, President of IFOAM Organics International. “This competition is a great opportunity for them and the entire organic movement to showcase tried and tested innovative solutions that can bring true sustainability to our food and farming systems.” This year’s Solution Search judging panel includes, Cristiana Paşca Palmer (Minister of Environment, Waters and Forests for Romania and incoming Executive Secretary of the Convention on Biological Dieversity), Danielle Nierenberg (Co-Founder and President of Food Tank), Dr. Naoko Ishii (CEO and Chairperson of Global Environmental Facility), and Ilona Porsché, (Head of Blue Solutions Initiative), who said of her involvement, "I am excited to participate in this year’s Solution Search contest, and offer our technical expertise in sourcing, documenting and sharing solutions." Additional judges include Per Olsson, (Theme leader, Stockholm Resilience Center), Juan Pablo Bonilla (Sector Manager, Climate Change and Sustainable Development, Inter-American Development Bank), Bonnie McClafferty (Director, Agriculture and Nutrition, GAIN) and Pedro Alvarez Icaza L., (General Coordinator for Biological Corridors and Resources, CONABIO - Mexico). Over the next nine months, the Solution Search partners will be soliciting entries, working with expert judges to narrow the field and asking the public to weigh in and vote as well.    The grand prize winner will receive $30,000, and there will be four category prizes of $15,000. There will be an early entrant prize of $5,000 to the best entry received by February 10, 2017. All prize money must be used to further the winner’s solution and organization’s goals. All finalists will win a trip to New York City to attend a capacity-building workshop and awards ceremony alongside some of the biggest names in conservation and development. This contest is part of a larger project run in joint partnership by Rare and IFOAM-Organics International, and is funded by the International Climate Initiative (IKI), a German initiative supported by The Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety (BMUB) on the basis of a decision adopted by the German Bundestag. Over three years, the partners will work together to identify these promising approaches and then host capacity-building workshops across the globe to spread these effective solutions. This workshop series – known as Campaigning for Conservation, will aim to further empower local practitioners to raise awareness of the value of biodiversity and to conduct social marketing campaigns promoting behavior change in support of the identified solutions. All entries to this contest will become part of a larger network of stakeholders engaged in supporting biodiversity-friendly agriculture. Visit solutionsearch.org to learn more, apply, or nominate a fellow organization with a chance to win a $1,000 nomination prize yourself. Ranked in the top 25 NGOs in the world by NGO ADVISORS, Rare is an innovative conservation organization that implements proven conservation solutions and trains local leaders in communities worldwide. Through its signature social marketing campaigns (called Pride campaigns), Rare inspires people to take pride in the species and habitats that make their community unique, while also introducing practical alternatives to environmentally destructive practices. Employees of local governments or non-profit organizations receive extensive training on fisheries management, campaign planning and social marketing to communities. They are equipped to deliver community-based solutions based on natural and social science, while leveraging policy and market forces to accelerate positive environmental change through programs in clean water, sustainable agriculture, and coastal fisheries. To learn more about Rare, please visit http://www.rare.org. For more information and downloadable imagery, please visit our electronic press kit at https://www.rare.org/en-press-kit. Since 1972, IFOAM - Organics International has occupied an unchallenged position as the only international umbrella organisation within the organic agriculture sector, uniting an enormous diversity of relevant stakeholders and key actors. IFOAM - Organics International implements the will of its broad-based constituency, close to 800 Affiliates in 125 countries, in a fair, inclusive and participatory manner. IFOAM’s vision is worldwide adoption of ecologically, socially and economically sound agriculture systems, which will support the projects overarching goal to mainstream biodiversity into the agricultural sector. Through their extensive experi-ence working with smallholders, family farms and cooperatives in the sector, and by building local capacity through their Leadership Courses, IFOAM has the right knowledge, expertise, institutional structure and products to support the project. Since 2008, the International Climate Initiative (IKI) of the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety (BMUB) has been financing climate and biodiversity projects in developing and newly industrialising countries, as well as in countries in transition. Based on a decision taken by the German parliament (Bundestag), a sum of at least 120 million euros is available for use by the initiative annually. For the first few years the IKI was financed through the auctioning of emission allowances, but it is now funded from the budget of the BMUB. The IKI is a key element of Germany’s climate financing and the funding commitments in the framework of the Convention on Biological Diversity. The Initiative places clear emphasis on climate change mitigation, adaption to the impacts of climate change and the protection of biological diversity. These efforts provide various co-benefits, particularly the improvement of living conditions in partner countries. The IKI focuses on four areas: mitigating greenhouse gas emissions, adapting to the impacts of climate change, conserving natural carbon sinks with a focus on reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+), as well as conserving biological diversity. New projects are primarily selected through a two-stage procedure that takes place once a year. Priority is given to activities that support creating an international climate protection architecture, to transparency, and to innovative and transferable solutions that have an impact beyond the individual project. The IKI cooperates closely with partner countries and supports consensus building for a comprehensive international climate agreement and the implementation of the Convention on Biological Diversity. Moreover, it is the goal of the IKI to create as many synergies as possible between climate protection and biodiversity conservation.


Ohlendorf S.,EOMAP GmbH and Ko.KG | Muller A.,EOMAP GmbH and Ko.KG | Heege T.,EOMAP GmbH and Ko.KG | Cerdeira-Estrada S.,CONABIO | Kobryn H.T.,Murdoch University
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2011

Multispectral satellite data (WordView-2, IKONOS, QuickBird) are used to map bathymetry and spectral sea floor classes in a range of coastal areas. The standardized physics-based data processing integrates MODIS satellite data for the radiometric intercalibration and estimates of turbidity. This process includes corrections for sunglitter, the adjacency and the atmospheric effect. The water depth is calculated iteratively in combination with the spectral unmixing of the respective bottom reflectance on base of the subsurface reflectance. The final step of the processing classifies the bottom reflectance due to the spectral signature of different bottom types and biota using a specific cluster and classification approach. The comparison with in situ data at different sites worldwide proves the approach, but also emphasizes the necessity of radiometric well calibrated satellite data. © 2011 SPIE.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Los Angeles, CA (Feb. 21, 2017): The Tyler Prize Executive Committee will award the 2017 Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement to pioneering Mexican ecologist Professor José Sarukhán, for his scientific contributions to the field of biological diversity and institution-building. At a time when the fate of Mexico's rainforests was in critical danger from extensive land clearing, then-Mexican President Carlos Salinas turned to Sarukhán for advice on how to show the global community that the country valued its natural resources. In response Sarukhán masterminded a federal government department focused entirely on biodiversity - one of the first of its kind in the world. It became known as CONABIO, the 'National Commission for the Knowledge and Use of Biodiversity' (Spanish: Comisión Nacional para el Conocimiento y Uso de la Biodiversidad). Now in its 25th anniversary year, CONABIO runs what is considered as the largest, electronically accessible, national biodiversity database in the world, with over 11.2 million specimens. CONABIO is an interministerial Commission (spanning 10 federal ministries) that acquires knowledge and shapes policies on conservation and the sustainable use of Mexico's natural resources. This integrated approach to conservation has proven so successful that President Obama's advisory council recommended it be used as a model for the United States. Tyler Prize Executive Committee Chair Julia Marton-Lefèvre said Sarukhán was being recognized for identifying a scientific problem and creating a solution that was built into his nation's laws and regulations, through strong institutions. "As a world-class scientist - Sarukhán published in all the most esteemed scientific journals and got the highest prizes that every scientist wants. But he knew that seeking 'knowledge for the sake of knowledge' was no longer enough, and that saving the biodiversity in Mexico's forests would take much more than just excellent science. "Few scientists could convince a President to find budget for a federal-level conservation agency - but Sarukhán did, and because of that, Mexico's forests now have an institutional watchdog actively protecting their biodiversity. "Sarukhán has made sure that his science has led to practical solutions that are changing peoples' lives and changing the way the environment is able to provide us a home for the future," said Marton-Lefèvre. As the winner of the Tyler Prize, Sarukhán will receive a $200,000 cash prize and join the ranks of laureates that include Jane Goodall and E.O Wilson. Sarukhán said he was "honored and humbled" by the Prize, and attributed his social responsibility to his mentors, eminent biologist Arturo Gómez-Pompa (himself a Tyler Laureate) and botanist Dr. Efraim Hernández Xolocotzi. In the 1970's, both mentors had been two of the most effective voices of criticism of the government's rainforest clearing,. The experience was formative for Sarukhán, and helped him to understand that science was 'something that had to be fought for'. "Scientists should make people aware of the implications that research has on their surroundings and their own health. I believe that academia has a contract with society, to be outspoken if information is not being used the way it should be - perhaps because of political or economical reasons. I know that not everyone is built to do that kind of work, but if one feels they can take on this role, which might be called activism or politics, I think one has to do it," said Professor Sarukhán. As CONABIO's national coordinator, Sarukhán has worked under five different presidential administrations from both sides of the political spectrum - a role that has often required him to defend biodiversity as a national priority. "Scientists should defend a fundamental principle: humankind cannot move forward if governments pretend not to know, or not to be based, in fact and science." Harold Mooney, the 2008 Tyler Prize Laureate and Professor of Environmental Biology at Stanford University, said that Sarukhán is an extraordinary scientific leader and statesman. "He was one of the first academics to recognize the importance of building a link between conservation and development policies based on scientific knowledge." Professor José Sarukhán will be honored at an Award Ceremony in Washington DC on May 4th. Earlier that day he will give a special lecture and appear in a panel discussion. Members of the press interested in attending should email the Media Director (contact details below). Click here to download a fact sheet and photos of Professor Sarukhán. Established by the late John and Alice Tyler in 1973, the Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement is one of the first international premier awards for environmental science, environmental health and energy. Recipients encompass the spectrum of environmental concerns, including environmental policy, health, air and water pollution, ecosystem disruption and loss of biodiversity, and energy resources. The Prize is awarded by the international Tyler Prize Executive Committee with the administrative support of the University of Southern California. For more information on the Tyler Prize go to: http://www.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Tyler Prize Executive Committee will award the 2017 Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement to pioneering Mexican ecologist Professor José Sarukhán, for his scientific contributions to the field of biological diversity and institution-building. At a time when the fate of Mexico’s rainforests was in critical danger from extensive land clearing, then-Mexican President Carlos Salinas turned to Sarukhán for advice on how to show the global community that the country valued its natural resources. In response Sarukhán masterminded a federal government department focused entirely on biodiversity – one of the first of its kind in the world. It became known as CONABIO, the ‘National Commission for the Knowledge and Use of Biodiversity’ (Spanish: Comisión Nacional para el Conocimiento y Uso de la Biodiversidad). Now in its 25th anniversary year, CONABIO runs what is considered as the largest electronically accessible national biodiversity database in the world, with over 11.2 million specimens. CONABIO is an interministerial Commission (spanning 10 federal ministries) that acquires knowledge and shapes policies on conservation and the sustainable use of Mexico’s natural resources. This integrated approach to conservation has proven so successful that President Obama’s advisory council recommended it be used as a model for the United States. Tyler Prize Executive Committee Chair Julia Marton-Lefèvre said Sarukhán was being recognized for identifying a scientific problem and creating a solution that was built into his nation’s laws and regulations, through strong institutions. “As a world-class scientist – Sarukhán published in all the most esteemed scientific journals and got the highest prizes that every scientist wants. But he knew that seeking ‘knowledge for the sake of knowledge’ was no longer enough, and that saving the biodiversity in Mexico’s forests would take much more than just excellent science. “Few scientists could convince a President to find budget for a federal-level conservation agency – but Sarukhán did, and because of that, Mexico’s forests now have an institutional watchdog actively protecting their biodiversity. “Sarukhán has made sure that his science has led to practical solutions that are changing peoples’ lives and changing the way the environment is able to provide us a home for the future,” said Marton-Lefèvre. As the winner of the Tyler Prize, Sarukhán will receive a $200,000 cash prize and join the ranks of laureates that include Jane Goodall and E.O Wilson. Sarukhán said he was “honored and humbled” by the Prize, and attributed his social responsibility to his mentors, eminent biologist Arturo Gómez-Pompa (himself a Tyler Laureate) and botanist Dr. Efraim Hernández Xolocotzi. In the 1970’s, both mentors had been two of the most effective voices of criticism of the government's rainforest clearing. The experience was formative for Sarukhán, and helped him to understand that science was ‘something that had to be fought for’. “Scientists should make people aware of the implications that research has on their surroundings and their own health. I believe that academia has a contract with society, to be outspoken if information is not being used the way it should be – perhaps because of political or economical reasons. I know that not everyone is built to do that kind of work, but if one feels they can take on this role, which might be called activism or politics, I think one has to do it,” said Professor Sarukhán. As CONABIO’s national coordinator, Sarukhán has worked under five different presidential administrations from both sides of the political spectrum – a role that has often required him to defend biodiversity as a national priority. “Scientists should defend a fundamental principle: humankind cannot move forward if governments pretend not to know, or not to be based, in fact and science.” Harold Mooney, the 2008 Tyler Prize Laureate and Professor of Environmental Biology at Stanford University, said that Sarukhán is an extraordinary scientific leader and statesman. “He was one of the first academics to recognize the importance of building a link between conservation and development policies based on scientific knowledge.” Professor José Sarukhán will be honored at an Award Ceremony in Washington DC on May 4th. Earlier that day he will give a special lecture and appear in a panel discussion. Members of the press interested in attending should email the Media Director Bec Gill (contact details supplied). Click here to download a fact sheet and photos of Professor Sarukhán. About the Tyler Prize Established by the late John and Alice Tyler in 1973, the Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement is one of the first international premier awards for environmental science, environmental health and energy. Recipients encompass the spectrum of environmental concerns, including environmental policy, health, air and water pollution, ecosystem disruption and loss of biodiversity, and energy resources. The Prize is awarded by the international Tyler Prize Executive Committee with the administrative support of the University of Southern California. For more information on the Tyler Prize go to: http://www.tylerprize.org


Davila P.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Benitez H.,CONABIO | Barrios Y.,CONABIO | Cruz-Angon A.,CONABIO | Alvarez-Girard N.,CONABIO
Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society | Year: 2011

Mexico as a megadiverse country houses between 6 and 8% of the world's flora. However, the Mexican flora is facing challenges, including the presence of at least 981 threatened plant species and 618 exotic plant species, habitat loss, pollution, overexploitation of natural resources and the adverse effects of climate change, which are compromising its conservation and sustainable use. Mexico has been actively involved in the development and update of the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation (GSPC) adopted by the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). As a party to CBD, Mexico has established a Coordinating Committee for the Mexican Strategy for Plant Conservation (MSPC), which has adapted the GSPC to fit national needs and drafted a number of projects, indicators, means of verification and actors to ensure that the MSPC, as a public policy tool, really drives conservation and sustainable use actions among all sectors and lasts beyond the current administration. An agenda is being developed with activities that include the following: approaching Congress, identifying the relevance of the MSPC in the National Development Plan and the Mexican Biodiversity Strategy, making use of current environmental policies and an aggressive awareness programme. The MSPC includes simultaneous programmes of technical and political work. © 2011 The Linnean Society of London.


PubMed | National Autonomous University of Mexico and CONABIO
Type: | Journal: Zootaxa | Year: 2014

In this study the first blind species of Hyalella for Mexico is described; it is the second in the genus to be recorded there. The new species is closer to the eyeless species: H. anophthalma Ruffo, 1957, H. muerta Baldinger, Shepard & Threloff, 2000, H. caeca Pereira, 1989, H. spelaea Bueno & Cardoso, 2011 in Cardoso et al. 2011, H. imbya Rodrigues & Bueno, 2012 in Rodrigues et al. 2012, but with no curved seta at the inner ramus of uropod 1, antennae 1 shorter than antennae 2, no apical setae on the telson and a characteristic dorsoposterior carina and three pappose setae on the inner plate of maxilla 1. The morphological intraspecific variations that can be found in this genus are discussed.


Flores G.H.,University of California at Santa Cruz | Manduchi R.,University of California at Santa Cruz | Zenteno E.D.,CONABIO
2014 Ubiquitous Positioning Indoor Navigation and Location Based Service, UPINLBS 2014 - Conference Proceedings | Year: 2015

Most systems for pedestrian localization and self-tracking aim to measure the precise position of the walker and match it against a map of the environment. In some cases, a simpler topological description of the path taken may suffice. This is the case for the system described in this paper, which is designed to help a blind person re-trace the route taken inside a building and to walk safely back to the starting point. We present two turn detection algorithms based on hidden Markov models (HMM), which process inertial data collected by an iPhone kept in the walker's front pocket, without the need for a map of the environment. Quantitative results show the robustness of the proposed turn detectors even in the case of drift in the measurements and noticeable body sway during gait. © 2014 IEEE.


Moreno C.E.,Autonomous University of the State of Hidalgo | Rodriguez P.,CONABIO
Oecologia | Year: 2010

There is a genuine need for consensus on a clear terminology in the study of species diversity given that the nature of the components of diversity is the subject of an ongoing debate and may be the key to understanding changes in ecosystem processes. A recent and thought-provoking paper (Jurasinski et al. Oecologia 159:15-26, 2009) draws attention to the lack of precision with which the terms alpha, beta, and gamma diversity are used and proposes three new terms in their place. While this valuable effort may improve our understanding of the different facets of species diversity, it still leaves us far from achieving a consistent terminology. As such, the conceptual contribution of these authors is limited and does little to elucidate the facets of species diversity. It is, however, a good starting point for an in-depth review of the available concepts and methods. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

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