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News Article | October 29, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The power of game-based learning is emerging, and this week's Intentional Play Summit is gathering some of the biggest names in the space to explore meaningful gameplay as a means to teach and motivate. Trisuem CEO, André Thomas, is part of the impressive line-up, leading an interactive session on the impact of game-based learning in higher education, as well as lessons learned and best practices from his experience designing games that resonate with students and lead to more productive learning experiences. "Immersing learners in an experience that they can relate to - one that transforms static course materials and creates a highly interactive encounter - creates an entirely new opportunity to engage learners," said Thomas. "That said, effective game creation that students will buy into takes extensive expertise and research, not to mention a lot of iteration. Students are sophisticated in nature and want to connect with their content in a way that mirrors the innovation and imagination they are seeing in their games for entertainment. Highly productive game-based learning is no small task, yet when done correctly, has the potential to not only help students retain more information, but students have more fun in the process." Relying on his 20+ years in CGI production, most recently as the Head of Graphics – Football for EA Sports Football games, Thomas will showcase ARTé: Mecenas, Trisuem's strategy game that transports students into the Renaissance era, enabling targeted learning outcomes designed to enhance Art History courses. In "ARTé: Mecenas – Challenges in Creating a Learning Game for the Liberal Arts," Thomas will talk about the hurdles he and his team faced when creating the game, tactics to ensure an academically rigorous, yet enjoyable experience, and tips to avoid the pitfalls often associated with academic game development. ARTé: Mecenas is also among a select group of games that will be featured in the Summit's on-site arcade. Attendees will be able to demo the game and experience first-hand how students navigate through the games and how the content complements traditional Art History curriculum. The Intentional Play Summit kicks off October 7th at The Computer History Museum in Mountain View, CA. The event was founded to inspire bigger and bolder conversations about how to make better games for learning and meaningful purpose, as well as make better use of those games. About Triseum Triseum grew out of the LIVE Lab at Texas A&M University, which is why education will always remain at the heart of this gaming company. Since then, Triseum has partnered with industry leading experts in gaming and instructional design dedicated to building the highest quality educational video games. Creating world class digital experiences that profoundly impact students, Triseum's bold curiosity means pushing the boundaries of what educational games are all about. For more information, please visit http://www.triseum.com.


News Article | November 29, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Washington DC, November 29, 2016 – AARP today announced that companies may now apply to pitch at its sixth Innovation@50+ LivePitch event which will be held Wednesday April 12 and Thursday April 13, 2017, at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, CA. This dual-pitch event is the only one of its kind, bringing together innovative startups pitching before expert judges along with intended end users. Startup companies focused on either caregiving technology or financial technology, specifically around saving and planning, may now submit applications to be considered to be one of the ten companies from each category selected to pitch at the event. Registration is also open now to attend the two day event at a special $99 early bird price, which runs until December 31, 2016. To apply or to register, please visit http://www.innovation50plus.org. AARP’s Innovation@50+ LivePitch event is a two day pitch competition for emerging startups in health technology, highlighting caregiving solutions, and financial technology, specifically saving and planning. Ten finalist companies in each sector will present their business plans on stage in a rapid three minute presentation to a panel of industry expert judges, most of whom are venture capitalists and angel investors. Representing nearly 38 million members, the power of AARP takes this pitch event up a notch. Only Innovation@50+ LivePitch creates a dual-pitch event that also provides an audience of end user consumers who listen to the pitches and share feedback in real time, providing the companies invaluable market data on the spot. "We are pleased to start accepting applications from startup companies interested in pitching at our event. It is always interesting to see what businesses are focused on, what solutions are coming to market that will benefit people 50-plus and others,” said Jody Holtzman, Senior Vice President, Market Innovation, AARP. “This year, we are thrilled to add a financial technology (FinTech) focus, particularly around saving and planning, as well as health technology centered around caregiving, and are sure the two days will only build on the successes of our past five years.” Previous AARP Innovation@50+ LivePitch events have been held in Boston, Las Vegas, New Orleans, Miami, and last year’s event in Sunnyvale, CA, the heart of Silicon Valley. Of the first 45 finalists, 23 raised over $145 million in venture investment, and another four companies exited through acquisition. Applications are open for companies to apply to be considered to pitch beginning now through Friday, February 3rd, 2017, at http://www.innovation50plus.org. Additional information, including the 2017 sponsors, judges, advisors and coaches, as well as programming content and speakers, will be shared on the site as well. The 10 finalists in healthcare technology and 10 finalists in financial technology will be announced in advance of the event. Press are invited to attend the 6th AARP Innovation@50+ LivePitch event gratis and may register by contacting Laura Beck, laurabeck@adeointeractive.com. Representatives from AARP and past winners and finalists are also available for interviews. The AARP Innovation @50+ LivePitch event is produced with support by Adeo InterActive. About AARP AARP is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization, with a membership of nearly 38 million that helps people turn their goals and dreams into 'Real Possibilities' by changing the way America defines aging. With staffed offices in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, AARP works to strengthen communities and promote the issues that matter most to families such as healthcare security, financial security and personal fulfillment. AARP also advocates for individuals in the marketplace by selecting products and services of high quality and value to carry the AARP name. As a trusted source for news and information, AARP produces the world’s largest circulation magazine, AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. AARP does not endorse candidates for public office or make contributions to political campaigns or candidates. To learn more, visit http://www.aarp.org or follow @aarp and our CEO @JoAnn_Jenkins on Twitter.


Leading the Museum's $20 million software initiative to explore the history of software, encourage ongoing research and foster dialogue about future implications MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA--(Marketwired - March 01, 2017) - Today the Computer History Museum (CHM) announced its new Center for Software History, a major initiative to encourage global research in software's evolution and foster dialogue about its future implications. The center is a vital component of the Museum's $20 million software initiative, which also includes the major exhibition "Make Software: Change the World!" and acclaimed education program Broadcom Presents Design_Code_Build. Through exhibitions, educational programs, collecting and, with the new center, historical research, the software initiative leverages and enriches the Museum's extensive collections to understand and tell the story of software, the powerful ways it has shaped society, and to preserve this history for posterity. The center will explore the history of software, including its profound social implications, by collecting archival materials and preserving code, and especially by revealing stories of people -- software users and makers -- to uncover the business, intellectual, social and cultural histories of software. Oral histories and "software-in-action" demonstrations are key to this people-centered approach and are aligned with the Museum's commitment to explore the sweeping transformations brought about through computing. "No people, no code. The story of software is the story of the people who make it, who use it and who are shaped by it," said John C. Hollar, the Museum's president and chief executive officer. "Through the Center for Software History, CHM is exploring these people-centered stories and preserving software history. In important ways, software history is the story of how people have put computing to work." The director of the Center for Software History is David C. Brock, a historian of technology and an author of several books, including histories of Moore's Law and Fairchild Semiconductor, and a biography of Gordon Moore. Brock has conducted over a hundred oral histories, curated history of technology exhibitions, and served as a writer and executive producer for several recent documentary shorts and television documentaries, including "Moore's Law at 50," "Scientists You Must Know," "Gordon Moore," and "Arnold O. Beckman." He studied philosophy, sociology, and history of science and technology at Brown, Edinburgh, and Princeton respectively. The center's team includes curators Hansen Hsu and Al Kossow. Hsu is a former Apple software engineer and a historian and sociologist of technology with a focus on personal computing and object-oriented programming. Hsu has degrees in E.E.C.S. from Berkeley and history from Stony Brook. He received his Ph.D. in science and technology studies from Cornell, with a dissertation on the culture and values of the third-party Apple developer community. Al Kossow is the Robert N. Miner Software Curator of the Computer History Museum, responsible for the growth and preservation of the Museum's software collection. A 30-year veteran of the computer industry, Kossow created bitsavers.org, one of the world's largest online archives of historical software and computing documentation. The Center for Software History is already actively collecting software and archival materials, conducting oral histories, working on the preservation and conservation of code, publishing blog posts, making scholarly presentations on the center's work, and engaging with audiences through community events and academic conferences. Early highlights from the center's initiatives include: The Center for Software History has conducted and collected oral histories with prominent figures from the software history such as Ivan Sutherland, computer graphics and virtual reality pioneer; Dennis Austin and Tom Rudkin, principal developers of PowerPoint; Larry Tesler, creator of "cut and paste" and key contributor to user interface at Apple; Dick Kramlich, co-founder of New Enterprise Associates and prominent software venture investor; and Avie Tevanian, key developer of the Mach kernel, and lead software technologist for NeXT and Apple. CHM is one of the few cultural institutions in the world actively collection software for permanent preservation. The center has a rare collection of source code holdings, some of which include Photoshop 1.0, Microsoft Word for Windows Version 1.1a, Apple II DOS, and MacPaint version 1.3 and QuickDraw source code. This source code is accessible via the Museum's blog, with interpretation from our curators, and is preserved in the Museum's digital repository. The center is already well represented on the Museum's blog, @CHM, with in-depth posts that are enhanced by imagery of artifacts and videos of software demonstrations and oral histories. Examples include "Slide Logic: The Emergence of Presentation Software and Prehistory of PowerPoint," "The Deep History of Your Apps: Steve Jobs, NeXTSTEP, and Early Object-Oriented Programming," and "NeXT: Steve Job's dot.com IPO that Never Happened." The center is also engaging with diverse communities through public events, workshops, and symposia. In March 2017, the Center for Software History will host a significant conference of computing historians, Command Lines, with a special focus on software. The center's curatorial team is also presenting their work at scholarly conferences such as the Society for the History of Technology and the Society for the Social Studies of Science. The Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California, is a nonprofit organization with a four-decade history as the world's leading institution exploring the history of computing and its ongoing impact on society. The Museum is dedicated to the preservation and celebration of computer history and is home to the largest international collection of computing artifacts in the world, encompassing computer hardware, software, documentation, ephemera, photographs, and moving images. The Museum brings computer history to life through large-scale exhibits, an acclaimed speaker series, a dynamic website, docent-led tours, and an award-winning education program. The Museum's signature exhibitions are "Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing," described by USA Today as "the Valley's answer to the Smithsonian," and "Make Software: Change the World!" Other current exhibits include the "IBM 1401 Demo Lab," "PDP-1 Demo Lab," and "Where To? A History of Autonomous Vehicles." For more information and updates, call (650) 810-1059, visit www.computerhistory.org, check us out on Facebook, follow @computerhistory on Twitter, and read the Museum blog @chm.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

LONG BEACH, Calif., Feb. 23, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- The Computer History Museum is celebrating software with the opening of a new exhibition which will feature Bert Monroy's "Times Square" image printed with the Epson SureColor® P20000 64-inch printer. Exploring the history, impact and...


News Article | December 14, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA--(Marketwired - December 14, 2016) - The Computer History Museum (CHM) today announced that acclaimed journalist John Markoff, long-time technology writer for The New York Times and winner of the 2013 Pulitzer Prize, will join the Museum's staff as a historian in January 2017. Markoff is internationally recognized for his in-depth reporting and expertise in technology and science, having covered both subjects for nearly three decades. In his new role at the Museum, he will focus on writing, research, and moderating live programming. "John Markoff has been one of the leading writers and thinkers exploring the impact of computing on our lives and the implications for society in the future," said John C. Hollar, the Museum's president and chief executive officer. "We're delighted to welcome him as he continues this work, and his accomplished career, as a historian, writer and event host." In this newly created position at the Museum, Markoff will research and write about both historic and current topics in computing, including artificial intelligence. An early project will be his third book, a biography of Stewart Brand and a cultural history of Northern California during the heyday of Brand's Whole Earth Catalog. Markoff also will take an active role as an interviewer for the Museum's CHM Live speaker series, continuing a role he has long played as a moderator and a speaker for the Museum's live programming. Additionally, Markoff will conduct in-depth interviews for the Museum's landmark oral history collection, which now numbers more than 800 interviews. A Bay Area native, Markoff joined The New York Times in March 1988 as a reporter for its business section before writing exclusively about technology and, more recently, science. Prior to his near 30-year tenure at The Times, Markoff was a reporter for San Francisco's Pacific News Service from 1977 to 1981 and wrote a column on personal computing for The San Jose Mercury News from 1983 to 1985. He was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize multiple times before winning in 2013 for reporting on the impact of technology on labor and automation. Markoff has written two books that offer a unique perspective on computer history, including "What the Dormouse Said: How the Sixties Counterculture Shaped the Personal Computer Industry" in 2005 and "Machines of Loving Grace: The Quest for Common Ground between Humans and Robots" in 2015. "As a reporter I found the Computer History Museum became both a lively and instrumental part of Silicon Valley's ecosystem," said Markoff. "I am looking forward to being part of an institution that is building a living record of one of the most remarkable places in the world." Markoff joins an extensive interpretive team at CHM, including curators, educators, exhibit designers, and media producers. His appointment is part of a major expansion underway at CHM, beginning earlier this year with the launch of its Exponential Center, a new center dedicated to entrepreneurship and innovation. In January 2017, the Museum will open a major exhibition on the history and impact of software, followed by the opening of a new center dedicated to the Museum's vast collection of historic source code. In mid-2017, the Museum will reveal its first dedicated education space, a place for learners of all ages -- students, families and executives -- to engage with computing and technology. About the Computer History Museum The Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California, is a nonprofit organization with a four-decade history as the world's leading institution exploring the history of computing and its ongoing impact on society. The Museum is dedicated to the preservation and celebration of computer history and is home to the largest international collection of computing artifacts in the world, encompassing computer hardware, software, documentation, ephemera, photographs, and moving images. The Museum brings computer history to life through large-scale exhibits, an acclaimed speaker series, a dynamic website, docent-led tours, and an award-winning education program. The Museum's signature exhibition is "Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing," described by USA Today as "the Valley's answer to the Smithsonian." Other current exhibits include the "IBM 1401 Demo Lab," "PDP-1 Demo Lab," and "Where To? A History of Autonomous Vehicles." For more information and updates, call (650) 810-1059, visit www.computerhistory.org, check us out on Facebook, follow @computerhistory on Twitter, and read the Museum blog @chm.


MENLO PARK, Calif., Feb. 16, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Shakey the Robot, the world's first mobile, intelligent robot, developed at SRI International between 1966-1972, will be honored today with a prestigious IEEE Milestone in Electrical Engineering and Computing. The IEEE Milestone program...


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

As one of the Top Innovators chosen, L. Pierre de Rochemont, Founder & General Manager of Frontier NanoSystems, will present the company at the exclusive Venture Summit | West 2017 on March 1st at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, CA, where a select group of over 650 entrepreneurs, investors, and corporate developers will gather to be the first to meet this next wave of leading edge companies. “Frontier NanoSystems is excited and honored to be in this very elite group of youngStartup Ventures Top finalists,” de Rochemont exclaimed. “Manufacturing simplicity, with an emphasis on cLEAN, is a core element of our value proposition to investors and our customers”. Frontier NanoSystems’ holds the view that the success of any sweeping paradigm shift is rooted in economic sustainability. This means introducing new manufacturing systems that enable products with the requisite higher quality and serve the market without price subsidies of any kind. cLEAN is a core philosophy that minimizes waste, processing steps, logistical management, and emissions while increasing quality and end user value. Honoring the Best To Honor the youngStartup Ventures Top Innovator recipients, youngStartup Ventures has invited their CEOs and founders to present at Venture Summit | West, a forum for the most exciting early stage and emerging growth companies, and to share their insights on the future of innovation, and the entrepreneurial journey. Held at the Computer History Museum, this invitation-only conference is the premier venue for today's promising startups. For more information on The Summit visit: http://www.youngstartup.com/west2017/overview.php About Frontier NanoSystems Frontier NanoSystems, LLC, based in Austin, Texas, is commercializing an advanced additive, high productivity manufacturing technology that can efficiently produce ultra-high performance materials, including metals/alloys/superalloys, ceramics/electroceramics and semiconductors at unmatched rates and integrate them into high-value products with applications in the microelectronics, aerospace, energy, transportation, oil and gas, and other industry sectors. Visit frontiernano.com for more information.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: techcrunch.com

Deep in the Valley this afternoon, 500 Startups’ 19th demo day drew to a close at the Computer History Museum. Business-to-business software, fashion and beauty products made up the largest proportion of companies, but 500 left room for a few outliers. It’s tough for anyone to say who the next Twilio will be, but it just might be hidden somewhere in the 40 companies that presented today. We traveled down to Mountain View to sort through the noise to bring you our favorite startups from Batch 19.


News Article | December 15, 2016
Site: www.theguardian.com

A Bay Area family is holding on to its ramshackle farmstead in the heart of Google’s sprawling headquarters despite reason to believe it has been offered $5m to $7m by the tech giant for the tiny patch of land. The land – which is home to battered pickups, a crumbling ice house, and a handful of renters – is now surrounded on all sides by the tech company’s more than 25-acre campus in Mountain View, California. Measuring less than an acre, the property is also home to fig, tangerine, avocado and ancient pepper trees, many of which were planted and harvested by the late patriarch of the family, Victor Molinari, who died five years ago. His surviving relatives appear disinclined to sell. “Right now we’re living,” said Leonard Martinelli, 49. “We don’t need the money. Right now it’s not for sale.” His sister, Sandra Martinelli Bilyeu, 43, added: “If we keep it, we keep our history.” But it is not only the family’s history that is being preserved. Silicon Valley may now be synonymous with tech behemoths such as Google, Apple and Facebook, but not so long ago it was miles of lush farm fields where plums, cherries and tomatoes grew in abundance. Although Silicon Valley has been generous to the point of extravagance in preserving its own history – the massive Computer History Museum is almost exactly one mile away from the farmstead – the industry and its supporters have been less enthusiastic about memorializing anything before the advent of high tech. “I don’t think anyone sees any historic significance” in the property, said Mountain View city councilman Leonard Siegel. “Eventually all these properties are going to go. There’s nothing unique about them.” “It’s not as if the Golden Era of Mountain View was when it was agricultural,” added Siegel, who describes himself as a professional environmental advocate. “Silicon Valley’s strength is its permanent sense of evolution.” That sentiment was called “unfortunate and not surprising” by Brian Grayson of the valley’s preservation action council. “The fabric of a community comes from what happened here. Newcomers have no connection to why we came here except for more jobs. That’s it for them.” Those newcomers have transformed the agricultural land south of San Francisco into one of the most expensive swaths of real estate in the world, and the Martinelli family has witnessed the value of its land rocket. “That land is worth probably $5m-7m,” according to Myron Von Raesfeld, a leading real estate expert in the valley and former president of the Santa Clara County Association of Realtors. “I have reason to believe they’ve been offered that kind of money from Google.” Google declined to respond to inquiries about the attempted purchase of the property. The Martinelli clan no longer reside at the farmstead, which has been gradually surrounded by the tech giant’s campus, known as Googleplex, which provides offices for about 20,000 employees. Instead, it is now home to a handful of eclectic renters such as Mihail Kivachitsky, a self-described artist who declined to be interviewed but makes a living as a carpenter. Victoria Martinelli, 79, one of the elders of the Martinelli clan and the late Victor Molinari’s sister, remembers working the vegetable rows and learning to drive on a tractor in the fields during childhood summer vacations. She gave the Guardian a recent tour of the property. She glanced at a weathered shed, recalling how, about 70 years ago, her family built it and a now ruined barn. The latter included a place to keep the produce cold before trucking it to the San Francisco produce markets. “That was in 1946, maybe 1947,” Victoria Martinelli recalled. “That’s where they washed the fruit before it went on the truck. The shelves are where we stored the onions.” While her children appeared reluctant to let go of the family’s farm, Victoria Martinelli was more ambivalent. “We don’t know,” she said, noting that there were “lots of grandchildren” and endowing them with financial independence deserves consideration. Should the family change its mind and relinquish its farmstead, Google would extend its formidable imprint on Mountain View – resigning to history the bucolic fields that have since turned to concrete. “It’s a pretty much amazing-looking place right here in the middle of all this,” said Rob Carr, a young Google software engineer walking by the old farmhouse. “I can see the value in saving it. But I also believe property should be used.”


Conversation Will Explore Why IoT Offers Growth Opportunity for Global IP Business; ESD Alliance to Exhibit, Showcasing Programs, New Initiatives, Growing Membership WHO: The Electronic System Design Alliance (ESD Alliance), an international association of companies providing goods and services throughout the semiconductor design ecosystem WHAT: Will host Lucio Lanza, managing director of Lanza techVentures, Dan Rubin, general partner of Alloy Ventures, and Bob Smith, the ESD Alliance's executive director, in conversation about the semiconductor intellectual property (IP) market during REUSE 2016. The ESD Alliance will exhibit at REUSE, highlighting its programs, new initiatives and growing list of member companies. WHEN: The discussion, "IoT: Poised to offer huge growth opportunities for the global IP Business," will be held from 4 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Thursday, December 1. REUSE 2016 will run from 11 a.m. until 8 p.m. Admittance is free. WHERE: Computer History Museum, Mountain View, Calif. To learn more about the ESD Alliance, go to: www.esd-alliance.org About REUSE 2016 REUSE 2016 is the first of an annual conference and trade show to bring together the semiconductor intellectual property (IP) supply chain and its customers for a full day of everything to do with semiconductor IP. To learn more about REUSE 2016, go to: www.reuse2016.com About the Electronic System Design Alliance The Electronic System Design (ESD) Alliance, an international association of companies providing goods and services throughout the semiconductor design ecosystem, is a forum to address technical, marketing, economic and legislative issues affecting the entire industry. It acts as the central voice to communicate and promote the value of the semiconductor design industry as a vital component of the global electronics industry. For more information about the ESD Alliance, visit http://www.esd-alliance.org All trademarks and registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

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