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Taimouri V.,Harvard University | Taimouri V.,Computational Radiology Laboratory | Taimouri V.,Boston Childrens Hospital | Akhondi-Asl A.,Harvard University | And 25 more authors.
International Journal of Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery | Year: 2014

Purpose: In planning for a potentially curative resection of the epileptogenic zone in patients with pediatric epilepsy, invasive monitoring with intracranial EEG is often used to localize the seizure onset zone and eloquent cortex. A precise understanding of the location of subdural strip and grid electrodes on the brain surface, and of depth electrodes in the brain in relationship to eloquent areas is expected to facilitate pre-surgical planning. Methods: We developed a novel algorithm for the alignment of intracranial electrodes, extracted from post-operative CT, with pre-operative MRI. Our goal was to develop a method of achieving highly accurate localization of subdural and depth electrodes, in order to facilitate surgical planning. Specifically, we created a patient-specific 3D geometric model of the cortical surface from automatic segmentation of a pre-operative MRI, automatically segmented electrodes from post-operative CT, and projected each set of electrodes onto the brain surface after alignment of the CT to the MRI. Also, we produced critical visualization of anatomical landmarks, e.g., vasculature, gyri, sulci, lesions, or eloquent cortical areas, which enables the epilepsy surgery team to accurately estimate the distance between the electrodes and the anatomical landmarks, which might help for better assessment of risks and benefits of surgical resection. Results: Electrode localization accuracy was measured using knowledge of the position of placement from 2D intra-operative photographs in ten consecutive subjects who underwent intracranial EEG for pediatric epilepsy. Average spatial accuracy of localization was 1.31 ± 0.69 mm for all 385 visible electrodes in the photos. Conclusions: In comparison with previously reported approaches, our algorithm is able to achieve more accurate alignment of strip and grid electrodes with minimal user input. Unlike manual alignment procedures, our algorithm achieves excellent alignment without time-consuming and difficult judgements from an operator. © 2013 CARS.


Kurugol S.,Computational Radiology Laboratory | Kurugol S.,Harvard University | Freiman M.,Computational Radiology Laboratory | Freiman M.,Harvard University | And 6 more authors.
Medical Image Analysis | Year: 2016

Quantitative diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DW-MRI) of the body enables characterization of the tissue microenvironment by measuring variations in the mobility of water molecules. The diffusion signal decay model parameters are increasingly used to evaluate various diseases of abdominal organs such as the liver and spleen. However, previous signal decay models (i.e., mono-exponential, bi-exponential intra-voxel incoherent motion (IVIM) and stretched exponential models) only provide insight into the average of the distribution of the signal decay rather than explicitly describe the entire range of diffusion scales. In this work, we propose a probability distribution model of incoherent motion that uses a mixture of Gamma distributions to fully characterize the multi-scale nature of diffusion within a voxel. Further, we improve the robustness of the distribution parameter estimates by integrating spatial homogeneity prior into the probability distribution model of incoherent motion (SPIM) and by using the fusion bootstrap solver (FBM) to estimate the model parameters. We evaluated the improvement in quantitative DW-MRI analysis achieved with the SPIM model in terms of accuracy, precision and reproducibility of parameter estimation in both simulated data and in 68 abdominal in-vivo DW-MRIs. Our results show that the SPIM model not only substantially reduced parameter estimation errors by up to 26%; it also significantly improved the robustness of the parameter estimates (paired Student's t-test, p < 0.0001) by reducing the coefficient of variation (CV) of estimated parameters compared to those produced by previous models. In addition, the SPIM model improves the parameter estimates reproducibility for both intra- (up to 47%) and inter-session (up to 30%) estimates compared to those generated by previous models. Thus, the SPIM model has the potential to improve accuracy, precision and robustness of quantitative abdominal DW-MRI analysis for clinical applications. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.

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