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News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

SAN FRANCISCO, May 15, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- A newly published study from researchers at the New York University (NYU) Langone Medical Center showed that brain training had significantly greater impact on improving cognition in patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) than the computer games used as an active comparison group. The brain training used in the study was BrainHQ from Posit Science. Cognitive impairment is reported to affect up to 70 percent of patients with MS, and there is no current, generally recommended method of treatment. While cognitive remediation has been used, it is expensive to administer in-person and requires patients to travel to appointments. The researchers at NYU’s MS Comprehensive Care Center explored whether advances in computer technology and telehealth would permit remote administration of computerized brain training. They enrolled 135 patients at Stony Brook Medicine, who were randomly assigned to either the brain-training group or the computer games active comparison group. Both groups were asked to train for an hour a day, five days a week, for 12 weeks (a total of 60 hours), according to an automated schedule. Researchers reported that compliance was high in both groups, with the games group averaging 57 hours and the brain-training group averaging 38 hours. Both groups improved in the overall cognitive measure.  However, despite training about one-third fewer hours, the brain-training group had nearly three times the gain of the games group.  The gain for the brain-training group in the overall cognitive composite score was about 29 percent. In addition to the objective neuropsychological battery, patients were asked, as a secondary measure, to self-assess whether they experienced any improvement in cognition.  In the brain-training group, 56.7 percent reported experiencing improvement, as compared to 31 percent in the games group. The researchers selected BrainHQ exercises, because most of the exercises emphasize some aspect of visual and/or auditory speed of processing. Deficits in speed of processing are a signature cognitive symptom in MS patients. “This trial demonstrates that computer-based cognitive remediation accessed from home can be effective in improving cognitive symptoms for individuals with MS,” said Dr. Leigh Charvet, the study’s lead author. “The remote delivery of an at-home test and findings of cognitive benefit may also be generalizable to other neurological conditions in which cognitive function is compromised.” The study was published in PLOS ONE Neurology in an article entitled “Cognitive Function in Multiple Sclerosis Improves with Telerehabilitation: Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial.” It is believed to be the largest study, to date, measuring the impact of brain training on cognition in MS patients. “We are encouraged by this publication of results by independent researchers in yet another clinical population,” said Dr. Henry Mahncke, CEO of Posit Science, maker of the BrainHQ exercises used in the study. “With the assistance of other researchers and investors, these results will play a part in our plan to bring digital therapies to market after obtaining appropriate regulatory approvals.”


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

SAN FRANCISCO, May 15, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- A newly published study from researchers at the New York University (NYU) Langone Medical Center showed that brain training had significantly greater impact on improving cognition in patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) than the computer games used as an active comparison group. The brain training used in the study was BrainHQ from Posit Science. Cognitive impairment is reported to affect up to 70 percent of patients with MS, and there is no current, generally recommended method of treatment. While cognitive remediation has been used, it is expensive to administer in-person and requires patients to travel to appointments. The researchers at NYU’s MS Comprehensive Care Center explored whether advances in computer technology and telehealth would permit remote administration of computerized brain training. They enrolled 135 patients at Stony Brook Medicine, who were randomly assigned to either the brain-training group or the computer games active comparison group. Both groups were asked to train for an hour a day, five days a week, for 12 weeks (a total of 60 hours), according to an automated schedule. Researchers reported that compliance was high in both groups, with the games group averaging 57 hours and the brain-training group averaging 38 hours. Both groups improved in the overall cognitive measure.  However, despite training about one-third fewer hours, the brain-training group had nearly three times the gain of the games group.  The gain for the brain-training group in the overall cognitive composite score was about 29 percent. In addition to the objective neuropsychological battery, patients were asked, as a secondary measure, to self-assess whether they experienced any improvement in cognition.  In the brain-training group, 56.7 percent reported experiencing improvement, as compared to 31 percent in the games group. The researchers selected BrainHQ exercises, because most of the exercises emphasize some aspect of visual and/or auditory speed of processing. Deficits in speed of processing are a signature cognitive symptom in MS patients. “This trial demonstrates that computer-based cognitive remediation accessed from home can be effective in improving cognitive symptoms for individuals with MS,” said Dr. Leigh Charvet, the study’s lead author. “The remote delivery of an at-home test and findings of cognitive benefit may also be generalizable to other neurological conditions in which cognitive function is compromised.” The study was published in PLOS ONE Neurology in an article entitled “Cognitive Function in Multiple Sclerosis Improves with Telerehabilitation: Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial.” It is believed to be the largest study, to date, measuring the impact of brain training on cognition in MS patients. “We are encouraged by this publication of results by independent researchers in yet another clinical population,” said Dr. Henry Mahncke, CEO of Posit Science, maker of the BrainHQ exercises used in the study. “With the assistance of other researchers and investors, these results will play a part in our plan to bring digital therapies to market after obtaining appropriate regulatory approvals.”


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

SAN FRANCISCO, May 15, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- A newly published study from researchers at the New York University (NYU) Langone Medical Center showed that brain training had significantly greater impact on improving cognition in patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) than the computer games used as an active comparison group. The brain training used in the study was BrainHQ from Posit Science. Cognitive impairment is reported to affect up to 70 percent of patients with MS, and there is no current, generally recommended method of treatment. While cognitive remediation has been used, it is expensive to administer in-person and requires patients to travel to appointments. The researchers at NYU’s MS Comprehensive Care Center explored whether advances in computer technology and telehealth would permit remote administration of computerized brain training. They enrolled 135 patients at Stony Brook Medicine, who were randomly assigned to either the brain-training group or the computer games active comparison group. Both groups were asked to train for an hour a day, five days a week, for 12 weeks (a total of 60 hours), according to an automated schedule. Researchers reported that compliance was high in both groups, with the games group averaging 57 hours and the brain-training group averaging 38 hours. Both groups improved in the overall cognitive measure.  However, despite training about one-third fewer hours, the brain-training group had nearly three times the gain of the games group.  The gain for the brain-training group in the overall cognitive composite score was about 29 percent. In addition to the objective neuropsychological battery, patients were asked, as a secondary measure, to self-assess whether they experienced any improvement in cognition.  In the brain-training group, 56.7 percent reported experiencing improvement, as compared to 31 percent in the games group. The researchers selected BrainHQ exercises, because most of the exercises emphasize some aspect of visual and/or auditory speed of processing. Deficits in speed of processing are a signature cognitive symptom in MS patients. “This trial demonstrates that computer-based cognitive remediation accessed from home can be effective in improving cognitive symptoms for individuals with MS,” said Dr. Leigh Charvet, the study’s lead author. “The remote delivery of an at-home test and findings of cognitive benefit may also be generalizable to other neurological conditions in which cognitive function is compromised.” The study was published in PLOS ONE Neurology in an article entitled “Cognitive Function in Multiple Sclerosis Improves with Telerehabilitation: Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial.” It is believed to be the largest study, to date, measuring the impact of brain training on cognition in MS patients. “We are encouraged by this publication of results by independent researchers in yet another clinical population,” said Dr. Henry Mahncke, CEO of Posit Science, maker of the BrainHQ exercises used in the study. “With the assistance of other researchers and investors, these results will play a part in our plan to bring digital therapies to market after obtaining appropriate regulatory approvals.”


SALT LAKE CITY--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Atlantic Health System, a leading non-profit, clinically integrated health care system in New Jersey, will use Central Logic’s technology solution to support the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (CJR) bundled payments program implemented by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Central Logic collaborated with Atlantic Health System to develop Central Logic Patient Connect™, the first web-based technology to operationalize care coordination. The software will organize data for patients as they transition from hospital care and ensure that follow-up care is delivered. “The relationship between Central Logic and Atlantic Health System is based on a shared mission of improving patient care,” said Jennifer Holmes, Central Logic CEO and President. “Atlantic Health System will be able to use our technology solution, Patient Connect™, for patients undergoing knee and hip replacements and expand the scope of follow-up care to reduce the likelihood that these patients will need to be readmitted to the hospital. When combined with our Transfer Center solution, Atlantic Health System will have information on the entire episode of care and provide valuable data from inside and outside of the hospital’s four walls. We are proud to collaborate with Atlantic Health System on this innovative effort.” Atlantic Health System was instrumental in the development of a CJR module for Central Logic Patient Connect™. Using the technology solution will allow Atlantic Health System to track both preoperative and postoperative patients and make better predictions once those patients are discharged. In November 2015, CMS enacted The Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (CJR) model, designed to reduce cost and promote better patient outcomes though streamlined coordination of care for Medicare patients receiving hip and knee replacement surgery. Atlantic Health System has been participating in this bundling initiative since its inception in April, 2016. “Our promise to our communities is that all who enter our system will receive the highest quality care delivered at the right time, at the right place, and at the right cost,” said Jim Smith, administrator of bundle payment models for Atlantic Health System. “We have had the strategy and structure in place. With Central Logic Patient Connect™, we now have the technology to more efficiently fulfill our commitment. Central Logic Patient Connect is a robust technology solution and implementing it at Atlantic Health System will not only increase the productivity and capability of our staff, but it will help to ensure quality of care and reduce readmissions, among other benefits.” “We ultimately want patients to be placed back in their homes and then provide those patients with the resources to be comfortable and recuperating successfully. I believe our system and Central Logic Patient Connect™ will help us meet this goal.” Additionally, utilizing Central Logic Patient Connect™ will help Atlantic Health System streamline how patients move through the continuum of care to improve outcomes including reduced lengths of stay and readmissions as well as better overall patient experiences. Central Logic Patient Connect™ also will create operational efficiencies and allow the system’s care navigators to oversee a larger population of patients while maintaining and improving the quality of patient care. Atlantic Health System and Central Logic continue to work closely to determine the next use cases for Patient Connect About Central Logic: Central Logic is a leading innovative healthcare software solutions company that offers a comprehensive “end to end” suite of solutions that captures key patient information from inside and outside the hospital’s four walls to provide real-time visibility throughout a patient’s care continuum journey. Its flagship innovation, Central Logic Patient Connect™, was launched in 2016 and is one in Central Logic’s “end to end” suite of software solutions that connects, captures, and reports on critical patient care issues. Founded in 2005, Central Logic works collaboratively with more than 500 hospitals and thousands of healthcare professionals – including physicians, administrators and healthcare staff – to help hospitals and systems standardize processes, centralize actionable data and operationalize care coordination. Atlantic Health System, headquartered in Morristown, New Jersey, is a leading non-profit, clinically integrated health care system comprised of Atlantic Medical Group with more than 900 physicians and multispecialty care providers, medical centers, rehabilitation and urgent care. Atlantic Medical Group had more than 1.2 million patient visits in 2016. Locations include Morristown Medical Center in Morristown, NJ; Overlook Medical Center in Summit, NJ; Newton Medical Center in Newton, NJ; Chilton Medical Center in Pompton Plains, NJ; Hackettstown Medical Center in Hackettstown, NJ; and Goryeb Children’s Hospital in Morristown, NJ, as well as Atlantic Rehabilitation Institute, and Atlantic Home Care and Hospice. It also includes its subsidiary, Atlantic Ambulance Corporation. Atlantic Health System comprises 1,747 licensed beds, nearly 16,000 employees and more than 3,700 physicians. Atlantic Health System has a medical school affiliation with the Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University; is part of Atlantic Accountable Care Organization, one of the largest ACOs in the nation, and is a member of AllSpire Health Partners.


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

SAN FRANCISCO, May 15, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- A newly published study from researchers at the New York University (NYU) Langone Medical Center showed that brain training had significantly greater impact on improving cognition in patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) than the computer games used as an active comparison group. The brain training used in the study was BrainHQ from Posit Science. Cognitive impairment is reported to affect up to 70 percent of patients with MS, and there is no current, generally recommended method of treatment. While cognitive remediation has been used, it is expensive to administer in-person and requires patients to travel to appointments. The researchers at NYU’s MS Comprehensive Care Center explored whether advances in computer technology and telehealth would permit remote administration of computerized brain training. They enrolled 135 patients at Stony Brook Medicine, who were randomly assigned to either the brain-training group or the computer games active comparison group. Both groups were asked to train for an hour a day, five days a week, for 12 weeks (a total of 60 hours), according to an automated schedule. Researchers reported that compliance was high in both groups, with the games group averaging 57 hours and the brain-training group averaging 38 hours. Both groups improved in the overall cognitive measure.  However, despite training about one-third fewer hours, the brain-training group had nearly three times the gain of the games group.  The gain for the brain-training group in the overall cognitive composite score was about 29 percent. In addition to the objective neuropsychological battery, patients were asked, as a secondary measure, to self-assess whether they experienced any improvement in cognition.  In the brain-training group, 56.7 percent reported experiencing improvement, as compared to 31 percent in the games group. The researchers selected BrainHQ exercises, because most of the exercises emphasize some aspect of visual and/or auditory speed of processing. Deficits in speed of processing are a signature cognitive symptom in MS patients. “This trial demonstrates that computer-based cognitive remediation accessed from home can be effective in improving cognitive symptoms for individuals with MS,” said Dr. Leigh Charvet, the study’s lead author. “The remote delivery of an at-home test and findings of cognitive benefit may also be generalizable to other neurological conditions in which cognitive function is compromised.” The study was published in PLOS ONE Neurology in an article entitled “Cognitive Function in Multiple Sclerosis Improves with Telerehabilitation: Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial.” It is believed to be the largest study, to date, measuring the impact of brain training on cognition in MS patients. “We are encouraged by this publication of results by independent researchers in yet another clinical population,” said Dr. Henry Mahncke, CEO of Posit Science, maker of the BrainHQ exercises used in the study. “With the assistance of other researchers and investors, these results will play a part in our plan to bring digital therapies to market after obtaining appropriate regulatory approvals.”


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

SAN FRANCISCO, May 15, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- A newly published study from researchers at the New York University (NYU) Langone Medical Center showed that brain training had significantly greater impact on improving cognition in patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) than the computer games used as an active comparison group. The brain training used in the study was BrainHQ from Posit Science. Cognitive impairment is reported to affect up to 70 percent of patients with MS, and there is no current, generally recommended method of treatment. While cognitive remediation has been used, it is expensive to administer in-person and requires patients to travel to appointments. The researchers at NYU’s MS Comprehensive Care Center explored whether advances in computer technology and telehealth would permit remote administration of computerized brain training. They enrolled 135 patients at Stony Brook Medicine, who were randomly assigned to either the brain-training group or the computer games active comparison group. Both groups were asked to train for an hour a day, five days a week, for 12 weeks (a total of 60 hours), according to an automated schedule. Researchers reported that compliance was high in both groups, with the games group averaging 57 hours and the brain-training group averaging 38 hours. Both groups improved in the overall cognitive measure.  However, despite training about one-third fewer hours, the brain-training group had nearly three times the gain of the games group.  The gain for the brain-training group in the overall cognitive composite score was about 29 percent. In addition to the objective neuropsychological battery, patients were asked, as a secondary measure, to self-assess whether they experienced any improvement in cognition.  In the brain-training group, 56.7 percent reported experiencing improvement, as compared to 31 percent in the games group. The researchers selected BrainHQ exercises, because most of the exercises emphasize some aspect of visual and/or auditory speed of processing. Deficits in speed of processing are a signature cognitive symptom in MS patients. “This trial demonstrates that computer-based cognitive remediation accessed from home can be effective in improving cognitive symptoms for individuals with MS,” said Dr. Leigh Charvet, the study’s lead author. “The remote delivery of an at-home test and findings of cognitive benefit may also be generalizable to other neurological conditions in which cognitive function is compromised.” The study was published in PLOS ONE Neurology in an article entitled “Cognitive Function in Multiple Sclerosis Improves with Telerehabilitation: Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial.” It is believed to be the largest study, to date, measuring the impact of brain training on cognition in MS patients. “We are encouraged by this publication of results by independent researchers in yet another clinical population,” said Dr. Henry Mahncke, CEO of Posit Science, maker of the BrainHQ exercises used in the study. “With the assistance of other researchers and investors, these results will play a part in our plan to bring digital therapies to market after obtaining appropriate regulatory approvals.”


International Neurologists and MS Researchers will Present Opening Lectures, May 24-27 The preeminent conference for multiple sclerosis health care professionals, the 31st Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers (CMSC) Annual Meeting, presents opening day lectures with some of the top minds in MS treatment, comprehensive care and research. Taking place May 24-27, at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center in New Orleans, LA, the robust educational agenda includes opening lectures as well as panel discussions and continuing education programs for physicians, physician assistants, nurses, pharmacists, as well as mental health and rehabilitation professionals. “This year’s opening day lectures feature some of the leading authorities in MS care and research," said June Halper, CEO, Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers (CMSC). “The world of MS diagnosis, treatment and care is evolving, and attendees at the CMSC Annual Meeting will be immersed in the latest care strategies and research findings that lead to optimal outcomes for patients.” Aaron L. Boster, MD, opens the CMSC Annual Meeting with the John F. Kurtzke Memorial Lecture on  “MS Comprehensive Care:  A Team Sport.” Dr. Boster is a board-certified clinical neuroimmunologist specializing in multiple sclerosis (MS). On Thursday, May 25th, the Presidential Lecture by Jeffrey A. Cohen, MD, will be on:  “New McDonald Criteria.” Diagnostic criteria for multiple sclerosis have undergone successive revision and refinement, and an international consensus workshop recently was convened to assess the performance of the current 2010 McDonald Criteria. This presentation will summarize the discussions at the consensus workshop and the resultant proposed revisions to the McDonald Criteria. The John Whitaker Memorial Lecture takes place on Friday, May 26th. Jerry S. Wolinsky, MD, will moderate the lecture by Emmanuelle Waubant, MD, PhD, on: “How Research on Pediatric MS Can Inform Thoughts on MS Pathogenesis.” Brian G. Weinshenker, MD, will deliver the Donald Paty Memorial Lecture on Saturday, May 27, entitled:  “Induction or Aggressive Treatment for Multiple Sclerosis: Is it Right for Most, Some or No Patients?” Dr. Weinshenker will discuss the arguments for aggressive treatments as well as the inherent risks and help clinicians develop a better understanding and knowledge when discussing aggressive treatment with patients. In addition to the daily opening lectures, the CMSC Annual Meeting presents unique educational opportunities that include clinical courses, symposia, poster sessions, platform presentations, roundtable discussions, and workshops. The informational and networking dinners on May 24th will include “Meet the Professor,” with Giancarlo Comi, MD, discussing "What is New in MS Treatment: The Benefits in Everyday Clinical Practice." There are also full courses on “Fundamentals of MS Care,” “Current Topics and Trends in MS Rehabilitation,” “Core Concepts for the MS Nurse,” and timely topics that include “MJ for MS? —An MS Health Professional’s Guide to Cannabis,” “CNS Repair and Ways to Measure It,” “Unique Wellness Approaches to Progressive MS,” “Controversies in Multiple Sclerosis Treatments,” “T Cells/ B Cells,” and “Invisible Symptoms: Depression, Cognitive Dysfunction.” The 31st CMSC Annual Meeting is the only North America event that provides health care professionals, from a wide range of medical disciplines and from all over the world, with the latest information, treatment advancements, and research in comprehensive care in multiple sclerosis. For more information on the CMSC Annual Meeting and to register, visit: http://www.mscare.org/2017 ABOUT THE CONSORTIUM OF MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS CENTERS (CMSC) CMSC, the Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers, is the leading educational, training, and networking organization for MS healthcare professionals and researchers. The CMSC mission is to promote high-quality MS care through educational programming and accreditation including live and online events, research grants, technical journals and papers, and targeted advocacy efforts. The CMSC member network includes more than 11,000 international healthcare clinicians and scientists committed to MS care as well as more than 60 Veterans Administration MS Programs and 225 MS Centers in the US, Canada, and Europe. The 31st CMSC Annual Meeting, the largest gathering of MS professionals in North America, will take place May 24-27, in New Orleans, LA. For more information go to www.mscare.org. Follow CMSC on Twitter: @mscare.org and Facebook: CMSCmscare. Editor’s Note and PR Contact:  If you would like to attend the CMSC Annual Meeting as a member of the media, please contact Annie Scully at annie.scully@mscare.org, 201-310-9252


JERUSALEM--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. (NYSE and TASE: TEVA) today announced that data suggests that women with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (RMS) who were exposed to COPAXONE® 20 mg/mL daily during pregnancy are not at higher risk for congenital anomalies compared to reference rates for abnormal pregnancy outcomes reported in two large databases representing the general population. These data appeared as an “Online First” article on the Website of the International Journal of MS Care (IJMSC) and represent the largest published analysis of pregnancy pharmacovigilance data for an RMS treatment. MS is more common among women of childbearing age compared with any other age group. The average age of diagnosis is 30, and many women go on to have children after diagnosis. Approximately half of pregnancies are unintended, which means that women with MS may become pregnant unexpectedly while taking an MS treatment. None of the MS therapies are approved for use during pregnancy. “Physicians now have this data to consider as they consult with their RMS patients planning a family or already pregnant, to make individual treatment decisions,” said Patricia K. Coyle, M.D., professor and vice chair (clinical affairs) of neurology, and the director of the Multiple Sclerosis Comprehensive Care Center at the Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, New York. The analysis published in IJMSC compared 5,025 pregnancy cases with known outcomes from the Glatiramer Acetate (GA) Pharmacovigilance Database to two other databases of healthy women, the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program (MACDP)1 and the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT)2. When compared to the rate of congenital anomalies from the MACDP database, the rate for prospective pregnancies among women exposed to COPAXONE® while pregnant from the GA Pharmacovigilance Database was comparable to the general U.S. population. Similarly, the comparison between the GA Pharmacovigilance and EUROCAT data indicated that the rate of congenital anomalies is very similar to that of the general European population. “With more than 20 years of data collected on COPAXONE®, we are able to share this important analysis with physicians to consider and counsel their patients of child-bearing age,” said Rob Koremans, M.D., President and CEO, Teva Global Specialty Medicines. “We are pleased to put forward this data that may help facilitate that conversation.” The publication, “Pregnancy Outcomes from the Branded Glatiramer Acetate Pregnancy Database,” is available online at http://ijmsc.org/doi/abs/10.7224/1537-2073.2016-079. The International Journal of MS Care is the official peer-reviewed publication of the Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers (CMSC). COPAXONE® (glatiramer acetate injection) is indicated for the treatment of patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis. The most common side effects of COPAXONE® are redness, pain, swelling, itching, or a lump at the site of injection, flushing, rash, shortness of breath, and chest pain. COPAXONE® is rated as Pregnancy Category B. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. Administration of glatiramer acetate by subcutaneous injection to pregnant rats and rabbits resulted in no adverse effects on offspring development. Animal reproduction studies are not always predictive of human response, therefore COPAXONE® should be used during pregnancy only if clearly needed. See additional important information at: www.CopaxonePrescribingInformation.com. For hardcopy releases, please see enclosed full prescribing information. The COPAXONE® brand is approved in more than 50 countries worldwide, including the United States, Russia, Canada, Mexico, Australia, Israel, and all European countries. Patients allergic to glatiramer acetate or mannitol should not take COPAXONE®. Some patients report a short-term reaction right after injecting COPAXONE®. This reaction can involve flushing (feeling of warmth and/or redness), chest tightness or pain with heart palpitations, anxiety, and trouble breathing. These symptoms generally appear within minutes of an injection, last about 15 minutes, and go away by themselves without further problems. During the postmarketing period, there have been reports of patients with similar symptoms who received emergency medical care. If symptoms become severe, patients should call the emergency phone number in their area. Patients should call their doctor right away if they develop hives, skin rash with irritation, dizziness, sweating, chest pain, trouble breathing, or severe pain at the injection site. If any of the above occurs, patients should not give themselves any more injections until their doctor tells them to begin again. Chest pain may occur either as part of the immediate postinjection reaction or on its own. This pain should only last a few minutes. Patients may experience more than one such episode, usually beginning at least one month after starting treatment. Patients should tell their doctor if they experience chest pain that lasts for a long time or feels very intense. A permanent indentation under the skin (lipoatrophy or, rarely, necrosis) at the injection site may occur, due to local destruction of fat tissue. Patients should follow proper injection technique and inform their doctor of any skin changes. The most common side effects of COPAXONE® are redness, pain, swelling, itching, or a lump at the site of injection, flushing, rash, shortness of breath, and chest pain. These are not all of the possible side effects of COPAXONE®. For a complete list, patients should ask their doctor or pharmacist. Patients should tell their doctor about any side effects they have while taking COPAXONE®. Patients are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088. Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. (NYSE and TASE: TEVA) is a leading global pharmaceutical company that delivers high-quality, patient-centric healthcare solutions used by approximately 200 million patients in 100 markets every day. Headquartered in Israel, Teva is the world’s largest generic medicines producer, leveraging its portfolio of more than 1,800 molecules to produce a wide range of generic products in nearly every therapeutic area. In specialty medicines, Teva has the world-leading innovative treatment for multiple sclerosis as well as late-stage development programs for other disorders of the central nervous system, including movement disorders, migraine, pain and neurodegenerative conditions, as well as a broad portfolio of respiratory products. Teva is leveraging its generics and specialty capabilities in order to seek new ways of addressing unmet patient needs by combining drug development with devices, services and technologies. Teva's net revenues in 2016 were $21.9 billion. For more information, visit www.tevapharm.com. This press release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 regarding the potential benefits of COPAXONE® which are based on management’s current beliefs and expectations and are subject to substantial risks and uncertainties, both known and unknown, that could cause our future results, performance or achievements to differ significantly from that expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Important factors that could cause or contribute to such differences include risks relating to: and other factors discussed in our Annual Report on Form 20-F for the year ended December 31, 2016 (“Annual Report”), including in the section captioned “Risk Factors,” and in our other filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, which are available at www.sec.gov and www.tevapharm.com. Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date on which they are made, and we assume no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements or other information contained herein, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. You are cautioned not to put undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. 1 Population-based tracking system for birth defects. The MACDP was established in 1967 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Emory University, and the Georgia Mental Health Institute. 2 European network of population-based registries for the epidemiologic surveillance of congenital anomalies


WASHINGTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) and the Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) are pleased to announce the University of Central Florida (UCF) as the recipient of the inaugural Public Health Excellence in Interprofessional Education Collaboration Award. A joint effort between the USPHS and IPEC, the Excellence in Interprofessional Education Collaboration Award is presented to a team of health professional students and/or faculty, whose interdisciplinary work has significantly impacted the community they serve. USPHS and IPEC applaud UCF’s interprofessional teams from the schools of medicine, nursing, social work, physical therapy, and pharmacy that collaborated with the Farmworkers Association to provide free clinics for uninsured farmworker families. USPHS and IPEC received many impressive applications from around the country and awarded the top honor to the UCF project addressing population health focused on the care of farmworkers, which exemplified excellence in interprofessional collaboration, community integration, and service to medically-underserved populations. UCF project members will be recognized by the IPEC Council on June 7, 2017, at the headquarters of the Association of American Medical Colleges in Washington, DC. “Public health starts with education,” emphasizes Rear Admiral Pamela M. Schweitzer, Pharm.D., BCACP, Chief Professional Officer of Pharmacy, U.S. Public Health Service. “To build a strong community health infrastructure, we must continue to learn collaboratively and serve collectively. In doing so, we can effectively promote and advance the health of our Nation.” In addition to an overall winner, USPHS and IPEC also recognize an honorable mention winner in five categories. A complete list of the winners follows: 2017 USPHS IPEC Inaugural Award: Overall Winner University of Central Florida from Orlando, FL Harnessing the Strength of Inter-Professional Teams to Provide Comprehensive Care for the Farmworkers of Apopka, Florida Judith S. Simms-Cendan, M.D., College of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Heather Peralta, DHSc, MSN, RN, College of Nursing Priya K. Patel, BS, College of Medicine (MedPACt) Alexander Diaz, BS, College of Medicine (MedPACt) 2017 USPHS IPEC Honorable Mention: Health Communications and Health Technology Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine from Lakewood Ranch, FL Community Paramedicine Victoria Reinhartz, Pharm.D., School of Pharmacy James Crutchfield, NREMT-P, CCEMT-P, CCHW, Manatee County Public Safety Department David Nonell, M.D., Manatee County Emergency Medical Services Melissa Larkin-Skinner, MBA, LMHC, Centerstone of Florida 2017 USPHS IPEC Honorable Mention: Behavioral Health University of Alabama at Birmingham from Birmingham, AL Bridging the Gap: Caring for Birmingham’s Most Vulnerable Populations Cynthia S. Selleck, Ph.D., RN, FAAN, School of Nursing Maria R. Shirey, Ph.D., MBA, RN, NEA-BC, ANEF, FACHE, FAAN, School of Nursing 2017 USPHS IPEC Honorable Mention: Public Health Infrastructure Massachusetts General Hospital Institute of Health Professions from Charleston, MA Crimson Care Collaborative: An Interprofessional Academic-Practice Partnership Patricia A. Reidy, DNP, FNP-BC, School of Nursing Marya J. Cohen, M.D., MPH, Harvard Medical School 2017 USPHS IPEC Honorable Mention: Community Empowerment and Education East Tennessee State University from Johnson City, TN East Tennessee State University Prescription Drug Abuse and Misuse Working Group Robert P. Pack, Ph.D., M.P.H, School of Public Health Nicholas Hagemeier, PharmD, Ph.D., Gatton College of Pharmacy Fred Tudiver, MD, College of Family Medicine Angela Hagaman, MA, LPCA, College of Public Health 2017 USPHS IPEC Honorable Mention: At Risk and Vulnerable Communities University of Alabama at Birmingham from Birmingham, AL Increasing Access to Healthcare Services through an Interprofessional, Student-Led, Health Education and Medical Screening Program for Homeless Men in Birmingham Alabama James R. Kilgore, Ph.D., PA-C, School of Health Professions Kimberly Meadows Clark, Firehouse Ministries Doug Kovash, Firehouse Ministries J.M. Trimm, Ph.D, School of Health Professions Award nominations submitted by interprofessional teams were evaluated by their contribution to public health promotion through multidisciplinary collaboration among health professionals and the community. These partnerships are the cornerstone of accessible, safe, impactful, high quality community healthcare and demonstrate IPEC’s vision for team-based, community-oriented practice. “Interprofessional health care practice is achievable and it works,” says Richard W. Valachovic, D.M.D., M.P.H., President of IPEC and President and CEO of the American Dental Education Association. “We applaud the students and faculty of the University of Central Florida, and all of the nominees, for showing that if we educate health professionals together, patients and the entire health care system benefit.” For more details about the award winners and upcoming 2018 application cycle, visit IPEC’s website.

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