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"An increasing number of companies realize that the benefits of being a first mover in emerging markets are significant. But these markets will inevitably mature and become competitive," Murphy explained. "Now is the time for companies to plan, build relationships, and begin operating in these emerging and frontier markets, and our board is uniquely qualified to lay the critical groundwork for our clients." The Board brings a mix of Wall Street and development experience and includes Peter Gaudet, President of Campfire Capital, an SDVOSB investment bank; Bert Laurent, an agricultural anthropologist with more than thirty years of senior management experience throughout Africa and the Caribbean; Tom Malinowski, former US Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights and Labor; and Sandee Pyne, Chief Executive Officer of Community Partners International (CPI). According to Gaudet, who worked across a vast spectrum of asset classes and markets over two decades in the institutional investment space, noted, there are new and growing opportunities in these regions, especially in energy, telecom, infrastructure, and the financial services industry. "Our clients," he said, "stand to realize significant returns on investment and make a positive impact for years to come." "The Board Members understand what motivates investors and what causes them to pause. There's no way to short-cut this work, and the right experts must be involved," Murphy said. "Our team is unmatched." Learn more about the board and their experience as well as the value-driven approach Inle Advisory Group offers on its website at www.inleadvisorygroup.com Founded in January 2013, Inle Advisory Group is a global emerging market-centric consulting firm based in the United States. The firm's capabilities include customized reporting, market entry and stakeholder engagement plans, and corporate social responsibility programming. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/responding-to-demand-for-emerging-market-services-consulting-firm-expands-and-deepens-expertise-300443284.html


Parmar P.K.,Harvard University | Benjamin-Chung J.,University of California at Berkeley | Smith L.S.,Community Partners International | Htoo S.N.,Burma Medical Association | And 9 more authors.
BMC International Health and Human Rights | Year: 2014

Background: Myanmar/Burma has received increased development and humanitarian assistance since the election in November 2010. Monitoring the impact of foreign assistance and economic development on health and human rights requires knowledge of pre-election conditions. Methods. From October 2008-January 2009, community-based organizations conducted household surveys using three-stage cluster sampling in Shan, Kayin, Bago, Kayah, Mon and Tanintharyi areas of Myanmar. Data was collected from 5,592 heads of household on household demographics, reproductive health, diarrhea, births, deaths, malaria, and acute malnutrition of children 6-59 months and women aged 15-49 years. A human rights focused survey module evaluated human rights violations (HRVs) experienced by household members during the previous year. Results: Estimated infant and under-five rates were 77 (95% CI 56 to 98) and 139 (95% CI 107 to 171) deaths per 1,000 live births; and the crude mortality rate was 13 (95% CI 11 to 15) deaths per thousand persons. The leading respondent-reported cause of death was malaria, followed by acute respiratory infection and diarrhea, causing 21.2% (95% CI 16.5 to 25.8), 16.6% (95% CI 11.8 to 21.4), and 12.3% (95% CI 8.7 to 15.8), respectively. Over a third of households suffered at least one human rights violation in the preceding year (36.2%; 30.7 to 41.7). Household exposure to forced labor increased risk of death among infants (rate ratio (RR) = 2.2; 95% CI 1.1 to 4.4) and children under five (RR = 2.1; 95% CI 1.3 to 3.6). The proportion of children suffering from moderate to severe acute malnutrition was higher among households that were displaced (prevalence ratio (PR) = 3.3; 95% CI 1.9 to 5.6). Conclusions: Prior to the 2010 election, populations of eastern Myanmar experienced high rates of disease and death and high rates of HRVs. These population-based data provide a baseline that can be used to monitor national and international efforts to improve the health and human rights situation in the region. © 2014 Parmar et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Parmar P.K.,Harvard University | Barina C.C.,Community Partners International | Barina C.C.,University of Washington | Low S.,Community Partners International | And 16 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

Background: Myanmar transitioned to a nominally civilian parliamentary government in March 2011. Qualitative reports suggest that exposure to violence and displacement has declined while international assistance for health services has increased. An assessment of the impact of these changes on the health and human rights situation has not been published. Methods and Findings: Five community-based organizations conducted household surveys using two-stage cluster sampling in five states in eastern Myanmar from July 2013-September 2013. Data was collected from 6, 178 households on demographics, mortality, health outcomes, water and sanitation, food security and nutrition, malaria, and human rights violations (HRV). Among children aged 6-59 months screened, the prevalence of global acute malnutrition (representing moderate or severe malnutrition) was 11.3% (8.0 - 14.7). A total of 250 deaths occurred during the year prior to the survey. Infant deaths accounted for 64 of these (IMR 94.2; 95% CI 66.5-133.5) and there were 94 child deaths (U5MR 141.9; 95% CI 94.8-189.0). 10.7% of households (95% CI 7.0-14.5) experienced at least one HRV in the past year, while four percent reported 2 or more HRVs. Household exposure to one or more HRVs was associated with moderate-severe malnutrition among children (14.9 vs. 6.8%; prevalence ratio 2.2, 95% CI 1.2-4.2). Household exposure to HRVs was associated with self-reported fair or poor health status among respondents (PR 1.3; 95% CI 1.1 - 1.5). Conclusion: This large survey of health and human rights demonstrates that two years after political transition, vulnerable populations of eastern Myanmar are less likely to experience human rights violations compared to previous surveys. However, access to health services remains constrained, and risk of disease and death remains higher than the country as a whole. Efforts to address these poor health indicators should prioritize support for populations that remain outside the scope of most formal government and donor programs. © 2015 Parmar et al.


Low S.,Community Partners International | Tun K.T.,Community Partners International | Mhote N.P.P.,Burma Medical Association | Mhote N.P.P.,Health Information System Working Group | And 5 more authors.
Global Health Action | Year: 2015

Background: Burma/Myanmar was controlled by a military regime for over 50 years. Many basic social and protection services have been neglected, specifically in the ethnic areas. Development in these areas was led by the ethnic non-state actors to ensure care and the availability of health services for the communities living in the border ethnic-controlled areas. Political changes in Burma/Myanmar have been ongoing since the end of 2010. Given the ethnic diversity of Burma/Myanmar, many challenges in ensuring health service coverage among all ethnic groups lie ahead. Methods: A case study method was used to document how existing human resources for health (HRH) reach the vulnerable population in the ethnic health organizations' (EHOs) and community-based organizations' (CBHOs) service areas, and their related information on training and services delivered. Mixed methods were used. Survey data on HRH, service provision, and training were collected from clinic-in-charges in 110 clinics in 14 Karen/Kayin townships through a rapid-mapping exercise. We also reviewed 7 organizational and policy documents and conducted 10 interviews and discussions with clinic-in-charges. Findings: Despite the lack of skilled medical professionals, the EHOs and CBHOs have been serving the population along the border through task shifting to less specialized health workers. Clinics and mobile teams work in partnership, focusing on primary care with some aspects of secondary care. The rapid-mapping exercise showed that the aggregate HRH density in Karen/Kayin state is 2.8 per 1,000 population. Every mobile team has 1.8 health workers per 1,000 population, whereas each clinic has between 2.5 and 3.9 health workers per 1,000 population. By reorganizing and training theworkforce with a rigorous and up-to-date curriculum, EHOs and CBHOs present a viable solution for improving health service coverage to the underserved population. Conclusion: Despite the chronic conflict in Burma/Myanmar, this report provides evidence of the substantive system of health care provision and access in the Karen/Kayin State over the past 20 years. It underscores the climate of vulnerability of the EHOs and CBHOs due to lack of regional and international understanding of the political complexities in Burma/Myanmar. As Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) integration gathers pace, this case study highlights potential issues relating to migration and health access. The case also documents the challenge of integrating indigenous and/or cross-border health systems, with the ongoing risk of deepening ethnic conflicts in Burma/Myanmar as the peace process is negotiated.


Low S.,Community Partners International | Tun K.T.,Community Partners International | Mhote N.P.,Burma Medical Association | Htoo S.N.,Burma Medical Association | And 3 more authors.
Global health action | Year: 2014

BACKGROUND: Burma/Myanmar was controlled by a military regime for over 50 years. Many basic social and protection services have been neglected, specifically in the ethnic areas. Development in these areas was led by the ethnic non-state actors to ensure care and the availability of health services for the communities living in the border ethnic-controlled areas. Political changes in Burma/Myanmar have been ongoing since the end of 2010. Given the ethnic diversity of Burma/Myanmar, many challenges in ensuring health service coverage among all ethnic groups lie ahead.METHODS: A case study method was used to document how existing human resources for health (HRH) reach the vulnerable population in the ethnic health organizations' (EHOs) and community-based organizations' (CBHOs) service areas, and their related information on training and services delivered. Mixed methods were used. Survey data on HRH, service provision, and training were collected from clinic-in-charges in 110 clinics in 14 Karen/Kayin townships through a rapid-mapping exercise. We also reviewed 7 organizational and policy documents and conducted 10 interviews and discussions with clinic-in-charges.FINDINGS: Despite the lack of skilled medical professionals, the EHOs and CBHOs have been serving the population along the border through task shifting to less specialized health workers. Clinics and mobile teams work in partnership, focusing on primary care with some aspects of secondary care. The rapid-mapping exercise showed that the aggregate HRH density in Karen/Kayin state is 2.8 per 1,000 population. Every mobile team has 1.8 health workers per 1,000 population, whereas each clinic has between 2.5 and 3.9 health workers per 1,000 population. By reorganizing and training the workforce with a rigorous and up-to-date curriculum, EHOs and CBHOs present a viable solution for improving health service coverage to the underserved population.CONCLUSION: Despite the chronic conflict in Burma/Myanmar, this report provides evidence of the substantive system of health care provision and access in the Karen/Kayin State over the past 20 years. It underscores the climate of vulnerability of the EHOs and CBHOs due to lack of regional and international understanding of the political complexities in Burma/Myanmar. As Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) integration gathers pace, this case study highlights potential issues relating to migration and health access. The case also documents the challenge of integrating indigenous and/or cross-border health systems, with the ongoing risk of deepening ethnic conflicts in Burma/Myanmar as the peace process is negotiated.


PubMed | Health Information System Working Group, Burma Medical Association, Back Pack Health Worker Team BPHWT, Community Partners International and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
Type: | Journal: Global health action | Year: 2014

Burma/Myanmar was controlled by a military regime for over 50 years. Many basic social and protection services have been neglected, specifically in the ethnic areas. Development in these areas was led by the ethnic non-state actors to ensure care and the availability of health services for the communities living in the border ethnic-controlled areas. Political changes in Burma/Myanmar have been ongoing since the end of 2010. Given the ethnic diversity of Burma/Myanmar, many challenges in ensuring health service coverage among all ethnic groups lie ahead.A case study method was used to document how existing human resources for health (HRH) reach the vulnerable population in the ethnic health organizations (EHOs) and community-based organizations (CBHOs) service areas, and their related information on training and services delivered. Mixed methods were used. Survey data on HRH, service provision, and training were collected from clinic-in-charges in 110 clinics in 14 Karen/Kayin townships through a rapid-mapping exercise. We also reviewed 7 organizational and policy documents and conducted 10 interviews and discussions with clinic-in-charges.Despite the lack of skilled medical professionals, the EHOs and CBHOs have been serving the population along the border through task shifting to less specialized health workers. Clinics and mobile teams work in partnership, focusing on primary care with some aspects of secondary care. The rapid-mapping exercise showed that the aggregate HRH density in Karen/Kayin state is 2.8 per 1,000 population. Every mobile team has 1.8 health workers per 1,000 population, whereas each clinic has between 2.5 and 3.9 health workers per 1,000 population. By reorganizing and training the workforce with a rigorous and up-to-date curriculum, EHOs and CBHOs present a viable solution for improving health service coverage to the underserved population.Despite the chronic conflict in Burma/Myanmar, this report provides evidence of the substantive system of health care provision and access in the Karen/Kayin State over the past 20 years. It underscores the climate of vulnerability of the EHOs and CBHOs due to lack of regional and international understanding of the political complexities in Burma/Myanmar. As Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) integration gathers pace, this case study highlights potential issues relating to migration and health access. The case also documents the challenge of integrating indigenous and/or cross-border health systems, with the ongoing risk of deepening ethnic conflicts in Burma/Myanmar as the peace process is negotiated.


Myers J.J.,University of California at San Francisco | Maiorana A.,University of California at San Francisco | Chaturvedi S.D.,University of California at San Francisco | Guilin V.,Community Partners International | And 6 more authors.
Journal of the International Association of Providers of AIDS Care | Year: 2016

Objective: To evaluate the implementation of community-based voluntary HIV counseling and testing (CBVCT) in the Eastern Caribbean. Methods: A total of 9782 unique HIV testing events performed through a national program of CBVCT in Antigua and Barbuda (2009-2012) were analyzed. The authors describe testers' demographic characteristics and assess demographic (education, housing, marital status, nationality, and age) and sexual exposure (partner gender, transactional sex, and multiple partners) factors associated with testing HIV-positivity and with condom use. Results: Older men and men having sex with women and women with higher education, of Antiguan nationality, and having sex with men were less likely to test positive for HIV. Younger, educated, and unmarried men and women with multiple partners were more likely to report using condoms. Conclusion: The CBVCT model can be successfully implemented in Eastern Caribbean. Demographic differences persist in HIV testing, risk behavior, and infection among vulnerable populations and should be considered in HIV prevention intervention design. © 2016 The Author(s).


Adams M.,Howard Hughes Medical Institute | Joshi S.N.,Howard Hughes Medical Institute | Mbambo G.,Howard Hughes Medical Institute | Mu A.Z.,Howard Hughes Medical Institute | And 14 more authors.
Malaria Journal | Year: 2015

Background: Highly sensitive, scalable diagnostic methods are needed to guide malaria elimination interventions. While traditional microscopy and rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) are suitable for the diagnosis of symptomatic malaria infection, more sensitive tests are needed to screen for low-density, asymptomatic infections that are targeted by interventions aiming to eliminate the entire reservoir of malaria infection in humans. Methods: A reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT- PCR) was developed for multiplexed detection of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene and ribosomal RNA of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. Simulated field samples stored for 14 days with sample preservation buffer were used to assess the analytical sensitivity and specificity. Additionally, 1750 field samples from Southeastern Myanmar were tested both by RDT and ultrasensitive RT-PCR. Results: Limits of detection (LoD) were determined under simulated field conditions. When 0.3 mL blood samples were stored for 14 days at 28°C and 80 % humidity, the LoD was less than 16 parasites/mL for P. falciparum and 19.7 copies/μL for P. vivax (using a plasmid surrogate), about 10,000-fold lower than RDTs. Of the 1739 samples successfully evaluated by both ultrasensitive RT-PCR and RDT, only two were RDT positive while 24 were positive for P. falciparum, 108 were positive for P. vivax, and 127 were positive for either P. vivax and/or P. falciparum using ultrasensitive RT-PCR. Conclusions: This ultrasensitive RT-PCR method is a robust, field-tested screening method that is vastly more sensitive than RDTs. Further optimization may result in a truly scalable tool suitable for widespread surveillance of low-level asymptomatic P. falciparum and P. vivax parasitaemia. © 2015 Adams et al.


PubMed | University of California at San Francisco, Community Partners International and Ministry of Health
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of the International Association of Providers of AIDS Care | Year: 2016

To evaluate the implementation of community-based voluntary HIV counseling and testing (CBVCT) in the Eastern Caribbean.A total of 9782 unique HIV testing events performed through a national program of CBVCT in Antigua and Barbuda (2009-2012) were analyzed. The authors describe testers demographic characteristics and assess demographic (education, housing, marital status, nationality, and age) and sexual exposure (partner gender, transactional sex, and multiple partners) factors associated with testing HIV-positivity and with condom use.Older men and men having sex with women and women with higher education, of Antiguan nationality, and having sex with men were less likely to test positive for HIV. Younger, educated, and unmarried men and women with multiple partners were more likely to report using condoms.The CBVCT model can be successfully implemented in Eastern Caribbean. Demographic differences persist in HIV testing, risk behavior, and infection among vulnerable populations and should be considered in HIV prevention intervention design.


PubMed | Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California at Los Angeles, Defence Services Medical Research Center, Community Partners International and Ministry of Health
Type: | Journal: Malaria journal | Year: 2015

Highly sensitive, scalable diagnostic methods are needed to guide malaria elimination interventions. While traditional microscopy and rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) are suitable for the diagnosis of symptomatic malaria infection, more sensitive tests are needed to screen for low-density, asymptomatic infections that are targeted by interventions aiming to eliminate the entire reservoir of malaria infection in humans.A reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT- PCR) was developed for multiplexed detection of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene and ribosomal RNA of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. Simulated field samples stored for 14 days with sample preservation buffer were used to assess the analytical sensitivity and specificity. Additionally, 1750 field samples from Southeastern Myanmar were tested both by RDT and ultrasensitive RT-PCR.Limits of detection (LoD) were determined under simulated field conditions. When 0.3 mL blood samples were stored for 14 days at 28 C and 80% humidity, the LoD was less than 16 parasites/mL for P. falciparum and 19.7 copies/L for P. vivax (using a plasmid surrogate), about 10,000-fold lower than RDTs. Of the 1739 samples successfully evaluated by both ultrasensitive RT-PCR and RDT, only two were RDT positive while 24 were positive for P. falciparum, 108 were positive for P. vivax, and 127 were positive for either P. vivax and/or P. falciparum using ultrasensitive RT-PCR.This ultrasensitive RT-PCR method is a robust, field-tested screening method that is vastly more sensitive than RDTs. Further optimization may result in a truly scalable tool suitable for widespread surveillance of low-level asymptomatic P. falciparum and P. vivax parasitaemia.

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