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Garballey is seeking the state senate seat vacated by the death of Sen. Ken Donnelly, D-Arlington. Garballey currently is a state representative for the 23rd Middlesex District covering Arlington and West Medford. A special primary election is schedule for June 27. The special general election is July 25. "The MNA endorsed Ken Donnelly for State Senate and we believe Sean Garballey is the best person to continue Donnelly's legacy at the State House," Kelly-Williams said. Garballey has pledged to support nurse efforts to improve patient care through the state legislature. These include safe patient limits for nurses, workplace violence prevention and safe patient handling bills. He also supports the collective bargaining rights of workers, making sure every public school has a school nurse and improvements for mental health patients. "I proudly support the efforts of the Massachusetts Nurses Association to protect patients and ensure fair treatment of nurses and other health care professionals," Garballey said. "I know many MNA nurses, understand their concerns and support their legislative solutions. As a State Senator, I will be honored to stand with the MNA and fight for high-quality patient care." Founded in 1903, the Massachusetts Nurses Association is the largest union of registered nurses in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Its 23,000 members advance the nursing profession by fostering high standards of nursing practice, promoting the economic and general welfare of nurses in the workplace, projecting a positive and realistic view of nursing, and by lobbying the Legislature and regulatory agencies on health care issues affecting nurses and the public. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/massachusetts-nurses-association-endorses-rep-sean-garballey-for-the-4th-middlesex-senate-district-300448993.html


"Nurses will join with the community on April 27 to show Baystate we are united for safe patient care," said Donna Stern, a psychiatric RN and chair of the BFMC RN Bargaining Committee. "Nurses are being pushed beyond our ability to safely care for our patients. If we have too many patients at one time, how can we provide high-quality care? If we work 12 hours without a break or are forced into illegal, mandatory overtime, how can we be sure our patients are getting the best possible care?" Nursing schedules recently issued by Baystate management demonstrate that on a regular basis the hospital is not scheduling enough nurses to provide safe patient care. Over a six-week period, from February 26 to April 8, the hospital left at least five RN shifts open on the schedule 50 percent of the time on just one medical-surgical unit. On 14 days of 42 days, there were six open shifts and on two days there were seven open shifts. "The hospital is failing to provide core nurse staffing from the very start when it issues schedules," said Jillian Sicard, RN and junior co-chair of the BFMC RN Bargaining Committee who works on the medical-surgical unit. "The hospital is scrambling to try and fill many open shifts, or is leaving them unfilled, to the detriment of patient care. Baystate forces unsafe patient assignments and unsafe working conditions on nurses. We cannot provide the high quality care our patients deserve when we have too many patients at one time, are fatigued and undernourished because we must work through our breaks, and are being mandated to work overtime despite a state law against it." For example, on March 10 the hospital did not schedule nurses to work seven of the 27 shifts that day on the medical-surgical unit, meaning 26 percent of the nurse shifts necessary for core staffing – for maintaining safe patient care – were not filled by management when it made the schedule. For a copy of the nurse schedules, contact Joe Markman at 781-571-8175 or jmarkman@mnarn.org. BFMC nurses have been bargaining with Baystate since November 2016. In recent weeks, nurses voted 93 percent to authorize a one-day strike, filed six unfair labor practice charges against Baystate with the National Labor Relations Board and participated in several community events. Bargaining is over a new contract to replace the agreement that was scheduled to expire Dec. 31, 2016. There have been 16 sessions held to date. A federal mediator joined the bargaining process in February. Key outstanding issues include safe patient limits for nurses targeted to BFMC patient needs, security improvements and making sure Baystate does not erode nurses' health insurance benefits and working conditions. For more details on the unfair labor practice charges, see this previous release: www.massnurses.org/BFMCcharges or click here for more information on the strike authorization vote. Contact Joe Markman at 781-571-8175 or jmarkman@mnarn.org for a copy of the NLRB charges, scheduling documentation, state Department of Public Health mandatory overtime reports or dozens of text messages from BFMC management requesting nurses come to work when they were scheduled to be off because of staffing shortages. Founded in 1903, the Massachusetts Nurses Association is the largest union of registered nurses in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Its 23,000 members advance the nursing profession by fostering high standards of nursing practice, promoting the economic and general welfare of nurses in the workplace, projecting a positive and realistic view of nursing, and by lobbying the Legislature and regulatory agencies on health care issues affecting nurses and the public. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/mna-baystate-franklin-medical-center-nurses-issue-10-day-notice-for-informational-picket-scheduled-for-thursday-april-27-300441125.html


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality and Third Sector Capital Partners have joined with three state and local governments to develop a new big-data infrastructure for evaluating programs that aim to increase economic opportunity. The San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency, the Santa Cruz Human Services Department, and the Washington Department of Early Learning will receive research and development support from Stanford and Third Sector. These government-nonprofit-university partnerships will build linked federal, state, and local administrative data sets for evaluating policy and improving economic outcomes and well-being. The first cohort of state and local agencies will be supported by a grant awarded by the Social Innovation Fund, a federal program of the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS), to the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality and Third Sector Capital Partners. This $1.5 million grant was matched by a $1.5 million contribution from the Ballmer Group. “These communities are showing their commitment to using data to develop programs based on outcomes. By accessing and linking to critical data, these communities will be able to better measure results and improve services. This effort is essential to expanding data-driven social programming resulting in delivering proven support to those individuals most in need,” said Caroline Whistler, CEO of Third Sector Capital Partners. The three awardees are: With new big-data capacity, each agency will be able to measure both short- and long-term effects of their programs. “The Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality is committed to improving the country’s infrastructure for evaluating and developing policy to reduce poverty and expand opportunity. These new partnerships will address key issues related to child and youth development, labor market attachment, and individual well-being. We’re excited to join with these communities to evaluate their economic opportunity programs, to learn what works and what doesn’t, and to build capacity for ongoing innovation,” said Charles Varner, Associate Director of the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality. In addition to evaluation and program design, award recipients will join in thematic learning communities that will span the entire West Coast to provide peer development opportunities and encourage the adoption of outcomes-based, data-driven policy. “The Social Innovation Fund is changing the way the government works with the private sector. We identify and invest in efficient and effective models so that more people can benefit from them,” said Lois Nembhard, Acting Director of the Social Innovation Fund. “This group of sub-recipients exemplify how communities are building innovative, data-driven programs. By supporting this opportunity, the Social Innovation Fund is continuing to support evidence-based public policy and create a pipeline of Pay for Success-ready governments.” THE STANFORD CENTER ON POVERTY AND INEQUALITY, a program of the Institute for Research in the Social Sciences at Stanford University, is a nonpartisan research center dedicated to monitoring trends in poverty and inequality, explaining what’s driving those trends, and developing science-based policy on poverty and inequality. The Center’s mission is to conduct and facilitate research on issues of domestic poverty, mobility, and inequality and to disseminate the results of this research to scholars, policy makers, and the general public. The guiding principle of the Center’s work is that research findings should be evidence-based, the result of rigorous scientific inquiry, and communicated clearly and objectively. For more information, visit inequality.stanford.edu. THIRD SECTOR CAPITAL PARTNERS leads governments, high-performing nonprofits, and private funders in building evidence-based initiatives that address society’s most persistent challenges. As experts in innovative contracting and financing strategies, Third Sector is an architect and builder of the nation’s most promising Pay for Success projects including those in Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, Santa Clara County, California and Salt Lake County, Utah. These projects are rewriting the book on how governments contract for social services: funding programs that work to measurably improve the lives of people most in need while saving taxpayer dollars. A 501(c)(3) nonprofit based in Boston, San Francisco and Washington, DC, Third Sector is supported by its work for governments and service providers as well as philanthropic and government grants. THE SOCIAL INNOVATION FUND (SIF) is a program of the Corporation for National and Community Service, a federal agency that engages millions of Americans in service through its AmeriCorps, Senior Corps, and Volunteer Generation Fund programs, and leads the nation’s volunteer and service efforts. The SIF positions the federal government to be a catalyst for impact—using public and private resources to find and grow community-based nonprofits with evidence of results. The SIF focuses on overcoming challenges confronting low-income Americans in three areas of priority need: economic opportunity, healthy futures, and youth development. To learn more, visit http://www.nationalservice.gov/sif.


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

BOSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--GE [NYSE: GE] announced today the appointment of three new company officers. William “Mo” Cowan has joined GE as Vice President of Litigation and Legal Policy. Prior to joining GE, Mo was President and Chief Executive Officer of ML Strategies and Counsel to Mintz Levin. Prior to rejoining Mintz Levin, Mo represented the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as interim United States Senator, filling the vacancy created when John F. Kerry was appointed United States Secretary of State. Immediately prior to his Senate service, he served in several leadership positions for Massachusetts Governor Deval L. Patrick, including Chief Legal Counsel (2009-2011), Chief of Staff (2011-2013) and Senior Advisor (2013). He earned his bachelor’s degree in sociology from Duke University and his juris doctor from Northeastern University. Kevin Ichhpurani has been appointed Executive Vice President of Global Ecosystem and Channels for GE Digital, responsible for developing the company’s partner ecosystem across all business units within GE. Prior to joining GE, Kevin was the Senior Partner, Head of Global Alliances and Ecosystem Innovation at Ernst & Young and previously Executive Vice President of Business Development and Global Partner Ecosystem at SAP. Kevin has spent 20 plus years in the technology sector focused on strategic business development, M&A, venture capital and corporate strategy. Kevin holds an MBA from Northwestern University. Athena Kaviris has been promoted to Vice President of Human Resources for GE Transportation and GE Labor Relations. With more than twenty years of experience at GE, Athena has held leadership roles in human resources at GE Lighting, GE Power, GE Capital, GE Aviation and GE Transportation. Athena earned her bachelor’s degree in psychology and business administration from the State University of New York and completed her master’s degree coursework in organization development from the University of San Francisco. GE (NYSE: GE) is the world’s Digital Industrial Company, transforming industry with software-defined machines and solutions that are connected, responsive and predictive. GE is organized around a global exchange of knowledge, the "GE Store," through which each business shares and accesses the same technology, markets, structure and intellect. Each invention further fuels innovation and application across our industrial sectors. With people, services, technology and scale, GE delivers better outcomes for customers by speaking the language of industry. www.ge.com


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

Major Development to Create 1,600 New Jobs in Marlborough Massachusetts Lt. Gov. Karyn Polito tours the 475,000-square foot Apex Center of New England in Marlborough, announces job creation. Marlborough, MA, May 26, 2017 --( The 475,000 square-foot Apex Center is among the largest developments currently underway in MetroWest and one of the biggest to come to Marlborough in the past decade. When completed in the fall of 2017, the development will consist of 11 buildings, including a 150,000-square-foot entertainment complex, two hotels, six restaurants, retail stores and office buildings. Over 96% of the space has already been leased and once it is fully operational, the Apex Center is expected to create 800 full-time and 800 part-time jobs. Massachusetts Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito announced the job numbers while touring the entertainment center project site yesterday, alongside developer Robert Walker, Marlborough Mayor Arthur Vigeant, Marlborough Economic Development Corporation (MEDC) executive director Meredith Harris and other local officials. The tour was organized on Polito’s recommendation, after the Commonwealth of Massachusetts awarded a $3.05 million MassWorks Infrastructure Program grant to the city in November 2016. The grant will fund roadway improvements along Route 20 West, including new turn lanes and upgraded signals, to support the Apex Center. “This is a proud moment for our Commonwealth,” said Polito while speaking at yesterday’s event. “My colleagues in the legislature and city officials and the municipal government here are coming together with the private sector to unleash an incredible opportunity here. While there is a lot of activity in eastern Massachusetts, in our capital city, seeing this level of investment and activity in the heart of our Commonwealth is really profound, and it’s a real testament to the city’s leadership. When you have a private business owner, who wants to come forward to do something in a community like this, when he comes to City Hall and you have a full team ready and open for business, it makes his decision that much easier as to whether to invest here or somewhere else. So, it’s a real credit to Marlborough for really signaling to the business community that its wants to see this kind of activity and that it’s ready to take it on as a community. What you are creating here in Marlborough is an opportunity for the next generation to stay in the community, where students can graduate, go into the workplace and find all that they need right here in the city - great education, great jobs and a great place to live, work and raise a family. Congratulations on your success story.” “Part of the reason we’re here is because of the Lieutenant Governor and MassWorks and Secretary Ash’s confidence in the city, as well as the City of Marlborough’s commitment,” Walker said. “We wouldn’t be here without the support of the city; they have been very welcoming. When you invest hundreds of thousands of dollars, sometimes millions, into a city, you bring those very important jobs of every aspect. From entry level, all the way to management and ownership. A lot of these folks here are independent owners of their own business, which gets me excited every day to see someone be able to grow and prosper and bring someone up along with them. It’s quiet a success story.” "It’s going to be about 15 months from the day the project broke ground to the day the first facility at the Apex Center opens this fall," Vigeant said. “That is a fantastic achievement. I can’t thank Robert Walker and Ryan Development enough for bringing such a major and unique development to the City of Marlborough and following through on their commitment to build quickly and bring jobs for our residents.” “The Apex Center development is a clear indicator of the health of the Marlborough economy,” Harris said. “A project of this size and scope can only thrive in an environment that is welcoming and prospering. We look forward to seeing the Apex Center open in the fall and, not only bring new amenities to the region’s residents and employers, but create new jobs for our local community. And if all 1,600 jobs go to Marlborough residents, we could virtually eliminate unemployment in the city.” For high resolution images from the tour, go to: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/p7g57z5sc5uustn/AACTYNWxv0IXIePc7aVsuCs0a?dl=0 For more information about the Apex Center of New England, go to: http://www.apexcenterne.com. About MEDC: The Marlborough Economic Development Corporation (MEDC) is the state chartered economic development corporation for the City of Marlborough, MA and represents a public-private partnership for planning. MEDC works with municipal and private investors to foster economic development, job growth and community revitalization. For a complete overview of MEDC, visit www.MarlboroughEDC.com. Marlborough, MA, May 26, 2017 --( PR.com )-- The Apex Center of New England, a unique commercial mixed-use development in the City of Marlborough, is expected to create 1,600 permanent jobs when it opens in October, in addition to the approximately 400 temporary jobs it has already created during construction.The 475,000 square-foot Apex Center is among the largest developments currently underway in MetroWest and one of the biggest to come to Marlborough in the past decade. When completed in the fall of 2017, the development will consist of 11 buildings, including a 150,000-square-foot entertainment complex, two hotels, six restaurants, retail stores and office buildings. Over 96% of the space has already been leased and once it is fully operational, the Apex Center is expected to create 800 full-time and 800 part-time jobs.Massachusetts Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito announced the job numbers while touring the entertainment center project site yesterday, alongside developer Robert Walker, Marlborough Mayor Arthur Vigeant, Marlborough Economic Development Corporation (MEDC) executive director Meredith Harris and other local officials. The tour was organized on Polito’s recommendation, after the Commonwealth of Massachusetts awarded a $3.05 million MassWorks Infrastructure Program grant to the city in November 2016. The grant will fund roadway improvements along Route 20 West, including new turn lanes and upgraded signals, to support the Apex Center.“This is a proud moment for our Commonwealth,” said Polito while speaking at yesterday’s event. “My colleagues in the legislature and city officials and the municipal government here are coming together with the private sector to unleash an incredible opportunity here. While there is a lot of activity in eastern Massachusetts, in our capital city, seeing this level of investment and activity in the heart of our Commonwealth is really profound, and it’s a real testament to the city’s leadership. When you have a private business owner, who wants to come forward to do something in a community like this, when he comes to City Hall and you have a full team ready and open for business, it makes his decision that much easier as to whether to invest here or somewhere else. So, it’s a real credit to Marlborough for really signaling to the business community that its wants to see this kind of activity and that it’s ready to take it on as a community. What you are creating here in Marlborough is an opportunity for the next generation to stay in the community, where students can graduate, go into the workplace and find all that they need right here in the city - great education, great jobs and a great place to live, work and raise a family. Congratulations on your success story.”“Part of the reason we’re here is because of the Lieutenant Governor and MassWorks and Secretary Ash’s confidence in the city, as well as the City of Marlborough’s commitment,” Walker said. “We wouldn’t be here without the support of the city; they have been very welcoming. When you invest hundreds of thousands of dollars, sometimes millions, into a city, you bring those very important jobs of every aspect. From entry level, all the way to management and ownership. A lot of these folks here are independent owners of their own business, which gets me excited every day to see someone be able to grow and prosper and bring someone up along with them. It’s quiet a success story.”"It’s going to be about 15 months from the day the project broke ground to the day the first facility at the Apex Center opens this fall," Vigeant said. “That is a fantastic achievement. I can’t thank Robert Walker and Ryan Development enough for bringing such a major and unique development to the City of Marlborough and following through on their commitment to build quickly and bring jobs for our residents.”“The Apex Center development is a clear indicator of the health of the Marlborough economy,” Harris said. “A project of this size and scope can only thrive in an environment that is welcoming and prospering. We look forward to seeing the Apex Center open in the fall and, not only bring new amenities to the region’s residents and employers, but create new jobs for our local community. And if all 1,600 jobs go to Marlborough residents, we could virtually eliminate unemployment in the city.”For high resolution images from the tour, go to: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/p7g57z5sc5uustn/AACTYNWxv0IXIePc7aVsuCs0a?dl=0For more information about the Apex Center of New England, go to: http://www.apexcenterne.com.About MEDC:The Marlborough Economic Development Corporation (MEDC) is the state chartered economic development corporation for the City of Marlborough, MA and represents a public-private partnership for planning. MEDC works with municipal and private investors to foster economic development, job growth and community revitalization. For a complete overview of MEDC, visit www.MarlboroughEDC.com. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Marlborough Economic Development Corporation


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

The DPH letter, sent to the hospital yesterday, was issued in response to a plan submitted by the hospital which the DPH requested as part of its legal review and evaluation of the closure's impact on the health of the community.  On April 17, the DPH had issued an initial finding that the beds slated for closure provided an essential service that is "necessary for preserving access and health status in the hospitals' service area."  The DPH had requested the hospital provide more detailed information about their plan for the closure and their rationale for how patients would be cared for post closure. In rejecting the hospital's closure plan, the DPH calls into question nearly every aspect of the hospital's rationale for the closure, stating UMass Memorial's response does not "meet the needs of the patients in the Community.  As a result of this review, the Department is deeply concerned that the proposed closure of thirteen out of twenty-seven psychiatric beds in the central Massachusetts area, will impact the timely admission and treatment of persons in need of inpatient psychiatric care."  The DPH further calls upon the hospital to "reassess" the closure "to best meet the needs of those individuals presenting with a need for inpatient psychiatric care."  Reporters can obtain a PDF of the letter by emailing dschildmeier@mnarn.org. The DPH is not alone in its opposition to the closure, as the plan has been met with strident opposition from every sector of the community, including leading mental health advocates, the Worcester City Council (which cast a unanimous vote in opposition to the closure), several members of the Worcester legislative delegation, local law enforcement officials, former patients and family members of patients, as well as staff at the facility. "No one outside of those proposing this callous and dangerous plan supports this closure," said Lisa Goss, RN, a nurse on 8 East, the unit where the beds are slated for closure. "All, including the agency in our state charged with protecting public health have evaluated and rejected the hospital's arguments for this closure, yet UMass has turned a deaf ear to the outcry from our community." UMass Management Shocks Staff by Threatening to Close the Unit Regardless of DPH Findings Goss's skepticism about UMass Memorial management's commitment to its patients is well founded.  Nearly two weeks ago, after the DPH issued its initial finding that the beds slated for closure were an essential service that should be preserved, and before UMass had even submitted its required response to DPH, hospital management met with the staff on the unit and told them that they planned to go forward with the closure no matter what DPH ruled. "We were shocked that our management could take such an arrogant position and show such blatant disdain for our patients, and those who oversee the safety of our patients," said Goss.  "In the interest of our patients and this community, we can only hope that UMass management finally comes to its senses and places its concern for patients ahead of its concern for the bottom line." The DPH rejected nearly every claim made by the hospital to justify the closing, including rejecting its contention that patients currently cared for on the unit can be safely admitted and cared for in other facilities in the region, particularly patients with both psychiatric and medical conditions, and patients who may be poor.  "As the existing beds at the Medical Center treat patients with both psychiatric and medical needs, the Department is deeply concerned that the lack of information on diagnoses accepted at alternative sites and the potential inability of these alternate sites to accept some patients from the Medical Center will delay transfer of these patients to a facility that can meet their needs" The DPH letter further states, "these additional sites are not immediately available…Given the uncertainty of bed availability, the Department questions the Medical Center's assertion that there is sufficient capacity to treat patients with serious medical needs. Further, the Department is concerned that the Medical Center's reliance on beds at other facilities will consequently strain the regional capacity and limit access to inpatient psychiatric services and lead to increased ED boarding." In January, the management of UMass Memorial Medical Center announced plans to close 13 of the 27 psychiatric beds on 8 East, its busy inpatient psychiatric unit, and to convert these beds to medical surgical beds. On 8 East staff care for patients from the age of 16 up to geriatrics. They suffer from a range of mental health issues such as depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety, schizophrenia, addiction, and also may be suicidal, self-injurious, and have homicidal thoughts and behavior. These patients often also need treatment for other medical issues which they are able to receive on 8 East because it is a medical psychiatric unit within an acute care hospital. This unit is nearly always full, while at the same time, the UMass University and UMass Memorial emergency departments are overburdened with psychiatric patients waiting for a bed on this or any other unit in the state that can take them These patients often wait several hours to several days for a bed. Founded in 1903, the Massachusetts Nurses Association is the largest union of registered nurses in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Its 23,000 members advance the nursing profession by fostering high standards of nursing practice, promoting the economic and general welfare of nurses in the workplace, projecting a positive and realistic view of nursing, and by lobbying the Legislature and regulatory agencies on health care issues affecting nurses and the public. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/mna-dph-rejects-umass-memorial-medical-centers-plan-to-close-psychiatric-beds-300454366.html


Local authors Michael J. Vieira & J. North Conway will be available to sign copies of book --The North Dartmouth Barnes & Noble will be hosting a book signing foron Saturday, May 20th at 2:00p.m. Authors Michael J. Vieira and J. North Conway will be available to sign copies. Stop by to get your copy of this local history book signed!New England is a rocky, rugged region. Its towns are marked by stone walls and its cities anchored by native granite and marble buildings. Historically significant boulders, many with Native American as well as colonial and neo-pagan origins, attract tourists from around the world. Some are formations that are complex in shape, form and significance, while others contain enigmatic messages, meanings and intriguing characteristics. Learn more about the famous sites like Plymouth Rock, the Old Man of the Mountain and the Sleeping Giant, as well as the lesser-known such as Profile Rock, Dighton Rock and Slate Rock. Authors Michael J. Vieira and J. North Conway examine the history, the legends and the people associated with forty-five notable geological wonders.Dr. Michael J. Vieira retired in 2013 after serving as associate vice-president for academic affairs at Bristol Community College in Fall River, Massachusetts, since 2008. Prior to this, he was dean of business and information management, also at BCC, for five years. Mike earned a PhD from Capella University, a BA and MAT from Bridgewater State College and a CAGS from Rhode Island College, as well as certifications from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.J. North Conway is the author of thirteen books, including a quartet of books about New York City during the Gilded Age: King of Heists, The Big Policeman, Bag of Bones and Queen of Thieves. Other works include American Literary: Fifty Books That Define Our Culture and Ourselves and The Cape Cod Canal: Breaking Through the Bared and Bended Arm.Barnes & Noble392 State Road Route 6North Dartmouth, MA 02747Saturday, May 20th, 2017 at 2:00 p.m.Available at area bookstores, independent retailers, and online retailers, or through Arcadia Publishing at (888)-313-2665 or online.The combination of Arcadia Publishing & The History Press creates the largest and most comprehensive publisher of local and regional content in the USA. By empowering local history and culture enthusiasts to write local stories for local audiences, we create exceptional books that are relevant on a local and personal level, enrich lives, and bring readers closer - to their community, their neighbors, and their past. Have we done a book on your town?  Visit www.arcadiapublishing.com


"We are delighted to add an experienced commercial biologics team and facilities to help meet the needs of this transformative industry," said Mark Bamforth, president and chief executive officer at Brammer. "We are building on more than a decade of supplying first-in-human cell and gene therapy clinical trials under the leadership of Dr. Richard Snyder, Brammer's chief scientific officer. Our commercial-ready Cambridge facility will be fully operational by Q4 2017. We appreciate Biogen's support during the transition of the facilities and skilled manufacturing personnel." Originally built for the manufacture of Biogen's clinical and commercial biologics, the 66,000 square-foot Cambridge facility in the heart of Kendall Square was licensed by regulatory authorities to manufacture four commercial products. Brammer is renovating the facility for late-stage clinical development and commercial launch of gene therapy products. Brammer also acquired Biogen's nearby 49,000 square-foot, state-of-the-art distribution and warehousing facility, providing high-quality storage and distribution capabilities. Secretary of Housing and Economic Development for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Jay Ash, commented, "By bringing novel medical treatments to patients and retaining biotech manufacturing jobs in Massachusetts, Brammer Bio is enhancing the Commonwealth's leading position in both life sciences and advanced manufacturing." Since completing a merger with Florida Biologix, an Ampersand Capital Partners' portfolio company, in March 2016, Brammer has doubled its capacity for process development and is expanding its clinical production space in Alachua, Florida. The addition of Massachusetts facilities gives Brammer 230,000 square feet of development, distribution, and CGMP manufacturing facilities. Brammer also previously announced plans to build-out its 50,000 square-foot facility in Lexington, Massachusetts, which is currently being designed for late stage and commercial cell therapy supply. About Brammer Bio Brammer Bio offers clinical and commercial services to supply vectors for in vivo gene therapy and ex vivo modified-cell based therapy. This includes process and analytical development, and regulatory support, enabling large pharma and biotech clients to accelerate the delivery of novel medicines to improve patients' health. Brammer is owned by Ampersand Capital Partners, the only institutional investor in the company, and its founders. For more information, please visit www.brammerbio.com. About Ampersand Capital Partners Ampersand is a middle market private equity firm with a focus on growth equity investments in the healthcare sector. Over the past two decades, Ampersand has managed more than $1 billion in private equity partnerships. Ampersand leverages its unique blend of private equity and operating experience to build value and drive superior long-term performance alongside its portfolio company management teams. Visit www.ampersandcapital.com. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/brammer-bio-announces-major-milestone-in-establishing-commercial-ready-gene-therapy-supply-for-the-industry-300453910.html


According to the survey, released by the Massachusetts Nurses Association at the State House on May 11, having too many patients at one time to care for is the most significant challenge to RNs providing high-quality patient care, with 77 percent of nurses identifying unsafe patient assignments as a problem. The survey also shows that patients are sicker than ever before, requiring highly specialized nursing care. To help educate the public about the role of RNs in today's complex health care environment, the MNA also premiered at the State House a video series called "What Nurses Really Do" alongside the survey. The first video and a call to action for more nurse videos can be seen at www.massnurses.org/WhatNursesDo. "When it comes to the delivery of patient care and the safety of patients, registered nurses are at the front lines of the health care system," said MNA President Donna Kelly-Williams, RN. "What happens to nurses and the nursing profession is directly connected to the ultimate health and well-being of every patient we encounter. In hospitals, nurses deliver 90 percent of the clinical care patients receive, and are the only caregivers legally and ethically accountable for the safety of patients every minute they are in the hospital." Nurses providing direct care report their patients have increased medical complications and are admitted to the hospital with more serious illness and injury today. Wide majorities of nurses – nearly eight-in-ten – say their patients are sicker now than patients ten years ago. More than half (53%) say their patients are much sicker – a figure that jumps to 63% among nurses working at community hospitals. Twice as many nurses say the staffing situation in their facility has gotten worse over the past four years (39%) as say it has gotten better (21%). Staffing issues are particularly problematic at community hospitals (8% gotten better, 41% gotten worse). Just one-in-ten nurses (10%) feels administrators at their hospital are very responsive to input from RNs about patient assignment levels. Three-in-ten (28%) say management rarely or never adjusts nurse staffing levels when RNs face unsafe patient loads. In each of these categories, RNs reported an increase in patient safety concern over 2015 survey results: "Our nurses are telling us that things are not working," said Rep. Denise Garlick, D-Needham. "We need to listen to them. Three years ago, I worked with my colleagues in the House and Senate to pass safe patient limits in our Intensive Care Units, knowing that it was the first step towards limits in all hospital units. Today's survey confirms that we must take that next step. Our nurses are telling us we need safe limits in all units to protect patients." By wide margins, nurses are more likely to say hospital mergers and acquisitions (21-point margin) and emerging business relationships between hospitals and pharmaceutical companies and/or medical device manufacturers (19-point margin) worsen the quality of patient care. Nurses are even more critical of the impact of insurance reimbursement changes, saying new insurance policies do more to worsen care by a 33-point margin. What Nurses Really Do For 15 straight years, nurses have topped Gallup's annual survey of the most honest and trustworthy professions. But many people don't really know what nurses do on a daily basis. "The State of Nursing in Massachusetts" shows that 43 percent of RNs do not believe patients understand their role. The reality is that nursing today is a complex and demanding profession. Patients are sicker than ever and are admitted to hospitals with serious medical complications. The MNA's video series, "What Nurses Really Do" features Massachusetts nurses speaking directly to the public, telling them about the specialized patient care they provide every day. The first installment in the series, debuting May 11 at the State House, features RNs from Cape Cod Hospital, Norwood Hospital and Brigham and Women's Faulkner Hospital. Nurses are encouraged to share their own experiences as nurses and tell the public what they really do at www.massnurses.org/WhatNursesDo. "The State of Nursing in Massachusetts" was commissioned by the MNA and conducted between April 5 and April 25, 2017 by Anderson Robbins Research, an independent research firm headquartered in Boston. The 2017 survey respondents were all registered nurses working in Massachusetts health care facilities randomly selected from a complete file of the 100,000 nurses registered with the Massachusetts Board of Registration in Nursing. Founded in 1903, the Massachusetts Nurses Association is the largest union of registered nurses in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Its 23,000 members advance the nursing profession by fostering high standards of nursing practice, promoting the economic and general welfare of nurses in the workplace, projecting a positive and realistic view of nursing, and by lobbying the Legislature and regulatory agencies on health care issues affecting nurses and the public. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/state-of-nursing-in-massachusetts-survey-released-for-national-nurses-week---results-strike-alarm-for-patient-safety-amid-drastic-changes-to-health-care-300456133.html


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Worksite Wellness Council of Massachusetts (WWCMA) announces Charlie Baker, Governor of Massachusetts, and Tad Mitchell, President and CEO of Wellright as their Keynote Speakers for the 6th Annual WWCMA Conference to be held on September, 19, 2017 at Gillette Stadium. Governor Charlie Baker was inaugurated as the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts on January 8th, 2015, after several decades of service in both state government and the private sector. Since taking office, Governor Baker has been making Massachusetts a great place to live, work and raise a family – while delivering a customer-service oriented state government that is as hard working as the people of the Commonwealth. Governor Baker believes people are policy and has appointed a bipartisan Cabinet and developed strong relationships with the legislature to work across the aisle and deliver results for our state. If Governor Baker is unable to attend the event due to unforeseen circumstances, another representative from his office will take his place. Tad Mitchell is the President and CEO of WellRight, a leading provider of employee wellness solutions. Mr. Mitchell is the co-author of 21 Habits: A Wellness Survival Guide, and the author of 101 Challenges: Become the Best You. “We are honored to have Governor Baker and Tad Mitchell as our keynote speakers for the 2017 WWCMA Annual Conference", states Niraj Jetly, WWCMA Education and Events Co-Chair, “We believe they will deliver outstanding presentations that will have a lasting impression on our attendees.” The WWCMA 6th Annual Conference theme is Establishing a Culture of Health: Supportive Wellness Strategies to Measure, Engage and Inspire. The focus this year will be on real life case studies from employers on their experiences with wellness programs, in addition to expert advice and research from wellness industry professionals. The conference is now open for registration and can be accessed on the Conference page of the WWCMA website.

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