Willowbrook, IL, United States
Willowbrook, IL, United States

Commonwealth Edison, commonly known as ComEd, is the largest electric utility in Illinois, serving the Chicago and Northern Illinois area. The service territory roughly borders in Iroquois County to the south, the Wisconsin border to the north, the Iowa border to the west, and the Indiana border to the east.For more than 100 years, Commonwealth Edison has been the primary electric delivery services company for Northern Illinois. Today, ComEd is a unit of Chicago-based Exelon Corporation , one of the nation's largest electric and gas utility holding companies. ComEd provides electric service to more than 3.7 million customers across Northern Illinois.Commonwealth Edison's transmission lines operate at voltages of 69,000, 138,000, 345,000, and 765,000 volts, delivering power to their 3.8 million customer base. ComEd's subtransmission voltage is 34,500 volts. Their distribution line voltages are 4,160 volts, 7,20013,800 volts. The company's revenues total more than $15 billion annually.ComEd has interconnections with American Electric Power on its 765KV system and with Wisconsin Electric to the north on its 345KV and 138KV systems and with Ameren to the south on its 345KV system. Wikipedia.


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Patent
Commonwealth Edison | Date: 2016-01-18

A closure device, specifically an occlusion device for heart surgery procedures, e.g., transapical aortic valve implantation, comprises first and second disks (2, 3) having first and second enlarged diameter flange portions (25, 35) adapted to be placed proximate either end of an apical hole in a patients heart wall, and first and second shoulder portions (20, 30) adapted to be placed within the apical hole near either end. A central waist portion (4) extends between the first and second disks (2, 3) along a center axis (A) of the device and is adapted to extend through the apical hole and interconnect the first and second disks (2, 3), while urging the disks (2, 3) toward one another when in the mounted condition.


Patent
Commonwealth Edison | Date: 2017-03-29

The present invention relates to closure devices In heart surgery procedures, in particular in transapical aortic valve implantation (TAVI). An occlusion device is provided comprising first and second disks (2, 3) havingfirst and second enlarged diameter flange portions (25, 35) adapted to be placed proximate either end of an apical hole in a patients heart wall. First and second shoulder portions (20, 30) of the respective disks (2, 3) are adapted to be placed within the apical hole near either end. A central waist portion (4) extends between and interconnects the first and second disks (2, 3) along a center axis (A) of the device. The central waist portion (4) is adapted to extend through the apical hole and connect the first and second disks (2, 3), while urging the disks (2, 3) toward one another when in the mounted condition.


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: www.forbes.com

For more than a century, people plugged their electrical appliances and machines into an outlet and were content to have the power flow from some far-off, unseen location. Electricity arrived from a power plant managed by a rather faceless utility company that most customers didn’t think about for more than a few minutes a month, as they wrote their monthly checks. All this began to change over the past decade as technologies for generating electricity from renewable sources—solar panels in particular—became more affordable and easier to acquire. By installing rooftop solar panels or purchasing backup generators and storage units, some consumers began taking greater responsibility for their own electricity—whether they were pursuing better reliability, more favorable economics or environmental benefits. But for the utilities that manage the electric system, these distributed energy resources (DERs) are a mixed bag. Utility executives are already dealing with a demand curve that is leveling off, due to greater energy efficiency. Now they must find ways to integrate electricity from new sources onto the grid. If unplanned, DERs can represent an unreliable supply of electricity that requires significant investments to accommodate in the grid system. However, when planned, DERs can help utilities deal with peak demand and perhaps even become a source of new revenue for energy companies—if they can find a role in the evolving economics of electricity. The first step is identifying where and how DERs can create value in the grid and for customers. Utilities typically have two broad options to meet peak electricity demand: Supply more electricity to meet demand, or constrain demand by encouraging conservation during peak periods. DERs offer additional options. If they can take up some of the load during peak periods, then utilities can put off investing in new “peaker” plants that supply extra electricity at times of greatest demand. Over time, if DERs result in fewer electrons flowing across the grid, utilities can put off adding substations and extend maintenance schedules. Utilities will still need to make investments in a smarter grid that can handle two-way traffic and integrate flows from many more sources. These investments are in addition to utilities’ existing maintenance and capex obligations, and the shorter lives of DER assets also contribute to attractive returns. Several states have approved grid-modernization programs that ensure such returns, including California (where San Diego Gas & Electric will invest $3.5 billion over 15 years) and Illinois (where Commonwealth Edison will invest $2.6 billion over 10 years). And a smarter grid may bring new opportunities for utilities to generate revenue, beyond infrastructure investments. New rules are coming into play will allow utilities to treat the procuring of electricity from DERs as a regulatory asset, which would in turn allow them to consider the costs of rebates or other DER investments in their rates and make a return on their investment. For example, Con Edison’s Brooklyn Queens Demand Management (BQDM) program uses a range of DER technologies (including storage, demand response and energy efficiency) to solve some distribution needs. Finally, customers’ enthusiasm for generating and managing their own electricity suggests a demand for new and competitive businesses that can help customers—particularly commercial and industrial ones—meet those needs. Energy services are becoming a more attractive part of the business, and some of the business models rely heavily on analytics and data gleaned from a smarter grid system. Whether utilities consider DERs primarily as an additional resource for planning electricity consumption—or they explore new revenue opportunities in developing grids or launching new energy service businesses—the arrival of DERs on a massive scale calls for proactive engagement. Utility executives who move assertively to understand and assess the evolving conditions can position their organizations to make the most of the opportunity. Read more: How Utilities Can Make The Most Of Distributed Energy Resources Aaron Denman is a partner with Bain & Company in Chicago, and Hubert Shen is a Bain partner in Los Angeles.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

CHICAGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Exelon Corporation (NYSE: EXC) announced first quarter 2017 consolidated earnings as follows: "Exelon delivered solid performance for shareholders and customers in the first quarter, achieving record reliability and operational excellence. We marked the one-year anniversary of our merger with Pepco Holdings, successfully executing on merger commitments and integration targets, while delivering tangible benefits to our new customers," said Christopher M. Crane, Exelon President and CEO. “We completed the acquisition of the FitzPatrick power plant, and recently began earning zero-emissions credit revenues in New York, helping to preserve jobs and deliver clean energy across the state. I am proud of the hard work of our 34,000 employees who safely deliver on our commitments to customers, shareholders and communities every day." Exelon's GAAP Net Income increased to $1.07 per share in the first quarter of 2017 from $0.19 per share in the first quarter of 2016. Exelon’s adjusted (non-GAAP) Operating Earnings decreased to $0.65 per share in the first quarter of 2017 from $0.68 per share in the first quarter of 2016. First quarter 2017 results include $0.09 per share of PHI Adjusted (non-GAAP) Operating Earnings. Adjusted (non-GAAP) Operating Earnings in the first quarter of 2017 reflect the following unfavorable factors: These factors were partially offset by: Adjusted (non-GAAP) Operating Earnings for the first quarter of 2017 do not include the following items (after tax) that were included in reported GAAP Net Income: (1) Represents a decrease in reserves for uncertain tax positions related to the deductibility of certain merger commitments associated with the 2012 CEG and 2016 PHI acquisitions. Adjusted (non-GAAP) Operating Earnings for the first quarter of 2016 do not include the following items (after tax) that were included in reported GAAP Net Income: ComEd consists of electricity transmission and distribution operations in Northern Illinois. ComEd's first quarter 2017 GAAP Net Income was $141 million compared with $115 million in the first quarter of 2016. Adjusted (non-GAAP) Operating Earnings for the first quarter of 2016 do not include merger and integration costs that were included in reported GAAP Net Income as reconciled in the table below: ComEd’s Adjusted (non-GAAP) Operating Earnings in the first quarter of 2017 increased by $31 million from the same quarter in 2016, primarily due to higher electric distribution and transmission formula rate earnings. Pursuant to the Illinois Future Energy Jobs Act, beginning in 2017, customer rates for ComEd will be adjusted to eliminate the favorable and unfavorable impacts of weather and customer usage patterns on distribution volumes. PECO consists of electricity transmission and distribution operations and retail natural gas distribution operations in Southeastern Pennsylvania. PECO’s first quarter 2017 GAAP Net Income was $127 million compared with $124 million in the first quarter of 2016. Adjusted (non-GAAP) Operating Earnings for the first quarter of 2017 and 2016 do not include merger and integration costs and cost management program costs that were included in reported GAAP Net Income as reconciled in the table below: PECO’s Adjusted (non-GAAP) Operating Earnings in the first quarter of 2017 remained relatively consistent with the same quarter in 2016. For the first quarter of 2017, heating degree days were down 2.0 percent relative to the same period in 2016 and were 15.4 percent below normal. Total retail electric deliveries and natural gas deliveries (including both retail and transportation segments) remained relatively consistent in the first quarter of 2017 compared with the same period in 2016. Weather-normalized retail electric deliveries were down 1.0 percent in the first quarter of 2017 compared with the same period in 2016, while natural gas deliveries remained relatively consistent. BGE consists of electricity transmission and distribution operations and retail natural gas distribution operations in Central Maryland. BGE’s first quarter 2017 GAAP Net Income was $125 million compared with $98 million in the first quarter of 2016. Adjusted (non-GAAP) Operating Earnings do not include merger and integration costs in the first quarter of 2017, and do not include merger and integration costs and cost management program costs in the first quarter of 2016, that were included in reported GAAP Net Income as reconciled in the table below: BGE’s Adjusted (non-GAAP) Operating Earnings in the first quarter of 2017 increased by $26 million from the same quarter in 2016, primarily due to increased distribution revenue pursuant to increased rates effective in June 2016 and decreased storm costs in the BGE service territory, partially offset by increased amortization due to the initiation of cost recovery of the AMI programs. Due to revenue decoupling, BGE is not affected by actual weather with the exception of major storms. PHI consists of electricity transmission and distribution operations in the District of Columbia and portions of Maryland, Delaware, and New Jersey and retail natural gas distribution operations in northern Delaware. PHI’s first quarter 2017 GAAP Net Income was $140 million compared with a GAAP Net Loss of $309 million for the period of March 24, 2016 to March 31, 2016. Adjusted (non-GAAP) Operating Earnings for the first quarter of 2017 and for the period of March 24, 2016 to March 31, 2016 do not include merger and integration costs and merger commitments that were included in reported GAAP Net Income (Loss) as reconciled in the table below: (1) Represents a decrease in reserves for uncertain tax positions related to the deductibility of certain merger commitments associated with the 2016 PHI acquisition. PHI’s Adjusted (non-GAAP) Operating Earnings for the first quarter of 2017 includes the impact of approved rate orders in 2016 and 2017. Generation consists of owned and contracted electric generating facilities and wholesale and retail customer supply of electric and natural gas products and services, including renewable energy products and risk management services. Generation's first quarter 2017 GAAP Net Income was $423 million compared with GAAP Net Income of $310 million in the first quarter of 2016. Adjusted (non-GAAP) Operating Earnings for the first quarter of 2017 and 2016 do not include various items (after tax) that were included in reported GAAP Net Income as reconciled in the table below: (1) Represents a decrease in reserves for uncertain tax positions related to the deductibility of certain merger commitments associated with the 2012 CEG and 2016 PHI acquisitions. Generation’s Adjusted (non-GAAP) Operating Earnings in the first quarter of 2017 decreased by $143 million compared with the same quarter in 2016, primarily reflecting the unfavorable impacts of declining natural gas prices on Generation's natural gas portfolio, increased nuclear outage days, decreased capacity prices and lower realized energy prices, partially offset by the impact of the Ginna Reliability Support Services Agreement in 2017. In addition to net income as determined under generally accepted accounting principles in the United States (GAAP), Exelon evaluates its operating performance using the measure of Adjusted (non-GAAP) Operating Earnings because management believes it represents earnings directly related to the ongoing operations of the business. Adjusted (non-GAAP) Operating Earnings exclude certain costs, expenses, gains and losses and other specified items. This measure is intended to enhance an investor’s overall understanding of period over period operating results and provide an indication of Exelon’s baseline operating performance excluding items that are considered by management to be not directly related to the ongoing operations of the business. In addition, this measure is among the primary indicators management uses as a basis for evaluating performance, allocating resources, setting incentive compensation targets and planning and forecasting of future periods. Adjusted (non-GAAP) Operating Earnings is not a presentation defined under GAAP and may not be comparable to other companies’ presentation. The Company has provided the non-GAAP financial measure as supplemental information and in addition to the financial measures that are calculated and presented in accordance with GAAP. Adjusted (non-GAAP) Operating Earnings should not be deemed more useful than, a substitute for, or an alternative to the most comparable GAAP measures provided in this earnings release and attachments. This press release and earnings release attachments provide reconciliations of adjusted (non-GAAP) Operating Earnings to the most directly comparable financial measures calculated and presented in accordance with GAAP, are posted on Exelon’s website: www.exeloncorp.com, and have been furnished to the Securities and Exchange Commission on Form 8-K on May 3, 2017. This press release contains certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, that are subject to risks and uncertainties. The factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the forward-looking statements made by Exelon Corporation, Exelon Generation Company, LLC, Commonwealth Edison Company, PECO Energy Company, Baltimore Gas and Electric Company, Pepco Holdings LLC, Potomac Electric Power Company, Delmarva Power & Light Company, and Atlantic City Electric Company (Registrants) include those factors discussed herein, as well as the items discussed in (1) Exelon’s 2016 Annual Report on Form 10-K in (a) ITEM 1A. Risk Factors, (b) ITEM 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations and (c) ITEM 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data: Note 24, Commitments and Contingencies; (2) Exelon’s First Quarter 2017 Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q (to be filed on May 3, 2017) in (a) Part II, Other Information, ITEM 1A. Risk Factors; (b) Part 1, Financial Information, ITEM 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations and (c) Part I, Financial Information, ITEM 1. Financial Statements: Note 17; and (2) other factors discussed in filings with the SEC by the Registrants. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which apply only as of the date of this press release. None of the Registrants undertakes any obligation to publicly release any revision to its forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date of this press release. Exelon Corporation (NYSE: EXC) is a Fortune 100 energy company with the largest number of utility customers in the U.S. Exelon does business in 48 states, the District of Columbia and Canada and had 2016 revenue of $31.4 billion. Exelon’s six utilities deliver electricity and natural gas to approximately 10 million customers in Delaware, the District of Columbia, Illinois, Maryland, New Jersey and Pennsylvania through its Atlantic City Electric, BGE, ComEd, Delmarva Power, PECO and Pepco subsidiaries. Exelon is one of the largest competitive U.S. power generators, with more than 33,300 megawatts of nuclear, gas, wind, solar and hydroelectric generating capacity comprising one of the nation’s cleanest and lowest-cost power generation fleets. The company’s Constellation business unit provides energy products and services to approximately 2.2 million residential, public sector and business customers, including more than two-thirds of the Fortune 100. Follow Exelon on Twitter @Exelon. As a result of the PHI acquisition completion on March 23, 2016, the table includes financial results for PHI beginning on March 24, 2016 to March 31, 2017. Therefore, the results of operations from 2017 and 2016 are not comparable for Exelon. The explanations below identify any other significant or unusual items affecting the results of operations.


CHICAGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--ComEd and the Metropolitan Mayors Caucus (MMC) announced today a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that will support the study and development of new energy efficiency programs, smart streetlights, and community and residential solar and other infrastructure projects. The MOU provides for a one-of-a-kind collaboration between ComEd and the MMC to develop a pilot for a national model on how utilities and municipalities can work together to create greener, more resilient and sustainable communities. The announcement follows a green light from the Illinois Commerce Commission (ICC) last month that established “smart” as the new standard for all streetlights that ComEd owns in northern Illinois. The new standard is expected to accelerate the deployment of smart LED street lighting service that will leverage the wireless communications network used by ComEd’s new smart grid platform that allows for two-way communication between the utility and its customers. “ComEd and the Metropolitan Mayors Caucus are working to enhance the livability and sustainability of the communities we serve,” said Anne Pramaggiore, president and CEO, ComEd. “We’re nearing the completion of the smart grid modernization program which is producing record reliability for our customers, and we’re eager to begin leveraging the strength of this modern digital platform. We will work together to inform cities and towns about the benefits of smart streetlights, solar power, and other technologies. We will also help municipalities that own their own streetlights to identify ways to fund the conversion to smart LED lights. We hope the lessons learned from this collaboration can be replicated across the entire ComEd service territory, Illinois and the nation.” This new initiative will also get a boost from the Future Energy Jobs Act (FEJA), which was enacted by the Illinois General Assembly and signed into law by Governor Rauner last year. It goes into effect in June and will increase funding for energy efficiency from $250 million to $400 million annually by 2030. These funds create savings opportunities for all customer classes, including municipalities, supporting the development of new energy efficiency programs as well as the conversion of current municipal lighting systems to smart LED streetlights. For the past six years, MMC has served as administrator of energy efficiency programs for the public sector through a program formally managed by the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO). The ICC recently granted a petition proposed by ComEd and the DCEO that will allow ComEd to assume responsibility for the program. “We’ve had considerable success working with Illinois utilities to create energy savings for our member communities, and we expect to expand on this record by working more directly with them,” said Robert J. Nunamaker, Executive Board Chairman of MMC. “Mayors throughout the region are very well aware of the importance of energy infrastructure. We understand what ComEd has done through the development of the smart grid program and we want to work with them to build on this smart foundation for the benefit of our entire region.” Preliminary discussions between ComEd and the MMC have been focused on development of projects to convert existing street lights to more efficient LEDs, which consume as little as one-third of the energy and last up to one and a half times as long as the fixtures they replace. In 2015, ComEd launched smart streetlight pilot projects in Bensenville and Lombard. Informed by learnings from these pilots, ComEd is developing plans to replace all 140,000 ComEd-owned municipal streetlights with LED streetlights beginning later this year. One of the first programs that the MMC will manage for ComEd under the MOU is a series of workshops with the South Suburban Mayors and Managers Association in south Cook County to help municipalities identify potential projects that they’d like to pursue. Connecting smart streetlights to the ComEd smart grid allows communities to remotely and instantaneously dim lights for energy savings and brighten them for greater safety. They can also be controlled on-demand by first responders to better manage emergency situations. Smart streetlights can also serve as a backbone for sensor-based, smart city features that allow for a broad range of solutions, from intelligent waste management to air quality monitoring, snow removal monitoring and traffic management. Founded in 1997, the Metropolitan Mayors Caucus is a membership organization of the Chicago region’s 275 cities, towns and villages. ComEd and the MMC have a long history of collaborating on issues that impact the region, such as energy efficiency, Powering Safe Community grants and storm response through the creation of Joint Operations Centers to help manage service restoration following extreme weather events. Commonwealth Edison Company (ComEd) is a unit of Chicago-based Exelon Corporation (NYSE: EXC), the nation’s leading competitive energy provider, with approximately 10 million customers. ComEd provides service to approximately 3.9 million customers across northern Illinois, or 70 percent of the state’s population. For more information visit ComEd.com, and connect with the company on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

CHICAGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--ComEd’s Manuel Avendaño, Ph.D., manager of Distribution Planning and Smart Grid at Chicago-based ComEd, was honored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) with the Technology Transfer Award for work that supports the efficient integration of renewable energy into the system. The Technology Transfer Award is given annually to utility employees who have explored and implemented innovative technologies on behalf of their company and the industry. Dr. Avendaño received the award on behalf of his team for its development of a new tool that automates the process of detailed modeling and analysis to help identify how much energy, including solar and other renewable energy, can be accommodated and integrated into the grid without impacting power quality or reliability. The key advantages of the tool include its efficient automated simulation capability and how it allows for scalability through the ComEd system, which includes more than 5,000 feeders and a vast combination of voltage class, conductor types and other characteristics. “We are delighted that one of our own has received this esteemed honor. We have some of the brightest minds at ComEd working to deliver the clean energy future our customers want,” said Anne Pramaggiore, ComEd president and CEO. “Over the last five years, ComEd has implemented one of largest smart grid and modernization programs in the nation and as a result, we have produced record reliability for our customers. We’re excited at the potential of this innovative tool to help accelerate our progress to bring more renewable energy onto our system.” The award was presented during EPRI’s Power Delivery and Utilization (PDU) awards dinner in Huntington Beach, Calif., on February 14. “The 2016 Technology Transfer Award winners have taken EPRI R&D to new levels in order to shape a sustainable energy system,” said Arshad Mansoor, senior vice president of R&D at EPRI. “Working in a collaborative environment, their advancements benefit their utility and the entire industry because we all have a stake in power system transformation.” Avendaño joins Barbara Gonzalez of Exelon sister utility Pepco in Washington, D.C., who also was honored for her efforts with electric vehicles. Five other employees from BGE in Baltimore and Pepco were recognized. Commonwealth Edison Company (ComEd) is a unit of Chicago-based Exelon Corporation (NYSE: EXC), the nation’s leading competitive energy provider with approximately 10 million customers. ComEd provides service to approximately 3.9 million customers across northern Illinois, or 70 percent of the state’s population. For more information visit ComEd.com and connect with the company on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

CHICAGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Saving money and earning a bill credit during the summer can be easy for customers who have smart meters and are enrolled in ComEd’s Peak Time Savings (PTS) program. PTS is an industry-leading program that essentially pays customers for using less energy on hot days when energy use is high. Through PTS, ComEd customers can earn a credit that will be applied to their bill when they voluntarily reduce their electricity usage during Peak Time Savings Hours which typically occur for a few hours between 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. during the hottest days of the summer. ComEd notifies PTS participants on the day when Peak Time Savings Hours will occur, as early as 9 a.m. or at least 30 minutes prior to the start. Notifications arrive via phone call, text message or email, or any combination of the three. Customers who reduce electricity during Peak Time Savings Hours, compared to what they typically would have consumed, earn $1 for every kilowatt hour (kWh) of energy saved. Since the program launch in the fall of 2014, participants have received more than $1.2 million in bill credits – credits that appeared as actual dollars off their total amounts due. Enrolling in PTS is easy, but a smart meter is required. Customers can visit ComEd.com/PTS to see if they’re eligible, to learn more about the program or to enroll. “The PTS program is made possible through smart meters and it’s putting real dollars back into the pockets of our customers,” said Val Jensen, senior vice president of Customer Operations. “We look forward to continuing to leverage smart meter technology to provide our customers with even greater control over their energy use.” According to a 2015 study conducted in conjunction with Citizen’s Utility Board and the Environmental Defense Fund, the PTS program reduced greenhouse gas emissions by 10 percent by comparing the reduced energy loads of a sample of PTS customers with those of similar customers who did not participate in the program. To date, ComEd has installed more than 2.7 million smart meters in homes and businesses. The company will complete the installation of 4 million smart meters throughout the service territory by the end of 2018. Smart meters are part ComEd’s smart grid investment program that has helped produce record power reliability and customer satisfaction results. In addition to programs like PTS, ComEd also manages one of the largest energy efficiency programs in the nation. The ComEd Energy Efficiency Program has saved customers more than $2 billion in energy costs since it launched in 2008. Home and business owners can take advantage of the energy efficiency programs. For more information about ways to save energy and money, please visit www.comed/waystosave. Commonwealth Edison Company (ComEd) is a unit of Chicago-based Exelon Corporation (NYSE: EXC), the nation’s leading competitive energy provider, with approximately 10 million customers. ComEd provides service to approximately 3.9 million customers across northern Illinois, or 70 percent of the state’s population. For more information visit ComEd.com, and connect with the company on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.theenergycollective.com

The U.S. electric grid is old and frayed, yet innovative technologies – modern sensors, smart meters, and advanced telecommunications – offer hope to update it to become more modern, efficient, and clean. What all these smart-grid tools have in common is data. How we utilize the enormous quantities of information about how we move and use electricity will have major impacts on markets, customers, the environment, and our future electricity system. The Illinois Commerce Commission (ICC) recognized this when, in mid-February, they approved an energy data-sharing program for Illinois’ largest electric utility, Commonwealth Edison (ComEd). The program, developed and advanced by Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) and Citizens Utility Board (CUB), allows companies and researchers access to anonymous energy-use data from ComEd’s nearly 4 million smart meters. This will encourage the development of energy-saving products and services designed to help Illinoisans save money. The data also will allow rooftop solar companies, energy efficiency providers, non-profits, researchers, cities, and other clean energy innovators to see which neighborhoods and blocks have the greatest potential for money-saving clean energy projects ─ ensuring no community is left behind. Moreover, this information will spur new offerings from smart home and appliance manufacturers, energy management specialists, HVAC and lighting companies, as well as market researchers. Much like the economic and customer benefits from digital phone data, electricity data benefits multiple bottom lines: Illinois is not the only state embracing the financial and environmental benefits of electricity data. A similar effort is being considered in New York as part of the Reforming the Energy Vision proceeding currently before state regulators. With states like Illinois and New York determined to prove what access to power data can do, we have even more hope in modernizing our electric grid and building the foundation for a clean economy.


Patent
Commonwealth Edison | Date: 2015-04-01

A cover comprises a frame having first and second sides oppositely disposed from one another. The frame defines a perimeter. A first plate is attached to the first side of the frame. A portion of the first plate extends outwardly from the perimeter and forms an engagement surface surrounding the frame. A second plate is attached to the second side of the frame. The cover has at least one lifting lug attached to the second plate. A gasket is attached to the engagement surface of the first plate. The cover is positioned within an opening to a vault. A portion of the interior surface of the vault forms a peripheral surface surrounding the opening. The cover is drawn against the opening so as to engage the gasket attached to the engagement surface of the cover with the peripheral surface surrounding the opening.


Patent
Commonwealth Edison | Date: 2012-10-26

A pulley system is provided to encourage contact between a pulley and a rope, chain, cord, cable and the like. The pulley system has first and second side legs, an axle, a pulley and at least one guide member. The guide member can be coupled to or formed integrally with at least one of the side legs. The guide member has at least one wall extending outwardly and away from the radial direction of the pulley to act as a funnel and encourage contact between a rope, chain, cable and the like and the pulley, thereby reducing the amount of force required to pull the item.

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