Farmington, CT, United States
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Frazier W.E.,Command Systems
Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance | Year: 2014

This paper reviews the state-of-the-Art of an important, rapidly emerging, manufacturing technology that is alternatively called additive manufacturing (AM), direct digital manufacturing, free form fabrication, or 3D printing, etc. A broad contextual overview of metallic AM is provided. AM has the potential to revolutionize the global parts manufacturing and logistics landscape. It enables distributed manufacturing and the productions of parts-on-demand while offering the potential to reduce cost, energy consumption, and carbon footprint. This paper explores the material science, processes, and business consideration associated with achieving these performance gains. It is concluded that a paradigm shift is required in order to fully exploit AM potential. © ASM International.


Jousselme A.-L.,Command Systems | Maupin P.,Command Systems
International Journal of Approximate Reasoning | Year: 2012

The purpose of the present work is to survey the dissimilarity measures defined so far in the mathematical framework of evidence theory, and to propose a classification of these measures based on their formal properties. This research is motivated by the fact that while dissimilarity measures have been widely studied and surveyed in the fields of probability theory and fuzzy set theory, no comprehensive survey is yet available for evidence theory. The main results presented herein include a synthesis of the properties of the measures defined so far in the scientific literature; the generalizations proposed naturally lead to additions to the body of the previously known measures, leading to the definition of numerous new measures. Building on this analysis, we have highlighted the fact that Dempster's conflict cannot be considered as a genuine dissimilarity measure between two belief functions and have proposed an alternative based on a cosine function. Other original results include the justification of the use of two-dimensional indexes as (cosine; distance) couples and a general formulation for this class of new indexes. We base our exposition on a geometrical interpretation of evidence theory and show that most of the dissimilarity measures so far published are based on inner products, in some cases degenerated. Experimental results based on Monte Carlo simulations illustrate interesting relationships between existing measures. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Harris D.C.,Command Systems
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2011

Magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is a deterministic method for producing complex optics with figure accuracy <50 nm and surface roughness <1 nm. MRF was invented at the Luikov Institute of Heat and Mass Transfer in Minsk, Belarus in the late 1980s by a team led by William Kordonski. When the Soviet Union opened up, New York businessman Lowell Mintz was invited to Minsk in 1990 to explore possibilities for technology transfer. Mintz was told of the potential for MRF, but did not understand whether it had value. Mintz was referred to Harvey Pollicove at the Center for Optics Manufacturing of the University of Rochester. As a result of their conversation, they sent Prof. Steve Jacobs to visit Minsk and evaluate MRF. From Jacobs' positive findings, and with support from Lowell Mintz, Kordonski and his colleagues were invited in 1993 to work at the Center for Optics Manufacturing with Jacobs and Don Golini to refine MRF technology. A "preprototype" finishing machine was operating by 1994. Prof. Greg Forbes and doctoral student Paul Dumas developed algorithms for deterministic control of MRF. In 1996, Golini recognized the commercial potential of MRF, secured investment capital from Lowell Mintz, and founded QED Technologies. The first commercial MRF machine was unveiled in 1998. It was followed by more advanced models and by groundbreaking subaperture stitching interferometers for metrology. In 2006, QED was acquired by and became a division of Cabot Microelectronics. This paper recounts the history of the development of MRF and the founding of QED Technologies. © 2011 Copyright Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Contract Interagency Agreement | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 185.00K | Year: 2012

None


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Contract Interagency Agreement | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 110.00K | Year: 2010

None


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Contract Interagency Agreement | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 71.12K | Year: 2010

None


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Contract Interagency Agreement | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 130.00K | Year: 2012

None


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Contract Interagency Agreement | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 1.47M | Year: 2010

None


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Contract Interagency Agreement | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 396.00K | Year: 2012

None


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Contract Interagency Agreement | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 1.26M | Year: 2012

None

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