Comite francais de lUICN

Paris, France

Comite francais de lUICN

Paris, France

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Wells S.,WCPA Marine | Addison P.F.E.,Australian Institute of Marine Science | Bueno P.A.,Parques Nacionales Naturales de Colombia | Costantini M.,Marine Programme | And 8 more authors.
Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems | Year: 2016

With the number of marine protected areas (MPAs) growing rapidly and progress being made towards protecting 10% of the ocean, as called for by the Convention on Biological Diversity, there is equally a need to increase efforts and provide incentives for effective management of these sites. The IUCN Green List of Protected and Conserved Areas (GLPCA), a voluntary global standard that protected areas and their agencies may decide to commit to working towards, has been set up to contribute to this. Protected areas can achieve Green List status by demonstrating a certain performance level and by meeting outcomes measured against a set of defined criteria. An assured verification process is followed before sites are recognized. The GLPCA will thus encourage and identify those protected areas (both terrestrial and marine) that are effectively managed, have equitable governance and achieve significant conservation impacts. The GLPCA pilot phase announced the first 25 protected areas to meet the criteria at the IUCN World Parks Congress in Sydney in November 2014. These included four MPAs: Iroise Natural Marine Park, Cerbère-Banyuls Natural Nature Reserve, and Guadeloupe National Park in France, and Gorgona National Park in Colombia. Italy and China also participated in the pilot phase and each has an MPA that is continuing to work towards GLPCA status. The experiences of these sites are described, as well as three other programmes (two regional and one global) that are being developed to promote improved management of MPAs. This information will be useful for other MPAs considering participation in the GLPCA initiative. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Delord K.,CNRS Chizé Center for Biological Studies | Barbraud C.,CNRS Chizé Center for Biological Studies | Bost C.-A.,CNRS Chizé Center for Biological Studies | Deceuninck B.,Ligue pour la Protection des Oiseaux | And 6 more authors.
Marine Policy | Year: 2014

Seabirds are increasingly threatened worldwide, with population declines for many species that are faster than in any other group of birds. Here the Important Bird Area (IBA) criteria recommended by BirdLife International were applied to a large tracking dataset collected from a range of seabirds, to identify areas of importance at an ocean basin scale. Key areas were identified using tracks obtained from both the breeding and non-breeding periods of 10 species that have different habitat requirements. These species range in their IUCN threat status from Least Concern to Critically Endangered. An evaluation of spatial overlap between the key areas for these species and the jurisdiction of Regional Fisheries Management Organisations (RFMOs), national Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs) and other stakeholder bodies highlighted the major importance of the French EEZs (around Crozet, Kerguelen and Amsterdam Islands) for seabird conservation. The majority of the candidate marine IBAs that were identified were located in the High Seas, where Marine Protected Areas cannot easily be designated under existing international agreements, except in the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources Convention Area. In the short term, it seems that only fisheries regulations (through international agreements) can bring about efficient protection for seabirds in the High Seas. The BirdLife IBA approach, although sensitive to heterogeneity in the data (species selected, inclusion of different life stages, years etc.), proved valuable for selecting important areas corresponding to large-scale oceanographic structures that are considered to be key foraging habitats for many species. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Soubeyran Y.,Comite francais de lUICN | Meyer J.-Y.,British Petroleum | Lebouvier M.,French National Center for Scientific Research | De Thoisy B.,Association Kwata | And 3 more authors.
Biological Invasions | Year: 2014

Invasive alien species (IAS) are one of the most serious threats to the rich and unique biodiversity of the 13 French overseas territories (FOTs) scattered across three oceans and two continents. To address this critical issue, a dedicated Initiative has been conducted since 2005, with the support of a large panel of national and local experts and stakeholders. This paper summarizes the main results and benefits of this project after 7 years. As a first phase, an unprecedented overview of IAS and their impacts in all the FOTs was achieved. A total of 630 alien taxa were recorded, among which 258 plants, 52 terrestrial vertebrates and 32 invertebrates were identified as a threat, or a potential threat, to native species and/or natural habitats. Gaps in the knowledge about invasive species were also highlighted and a comprehensive set of recommendations was developed. Using a range of targeted collaborative actions and promoting the exchange of information and regional cooperation, the Initiative raised awareness of invasive species issues, improved access to information and strengthened local and regional capacities. In this paper, we report on the outcomes of the Initiative and what remains to be done with regards to the prevention of new introductions, early detection, rapid response and public awareness, as well as future challenges. © 2014 Springer International Publishing Switzerland.


Soubeyran Y.,Comite francais de l'UICN | Meyer J.-Y.,British Petroleum | Lebouvier M.,French National Center for Scientific Research | De Thoisy B.,Association Kwata | And 3 more authors.
Biological Invasions | Year: 2014

Invasive alien species (IAS) are one of the most serious threats to the rich and unique biodiversity of the 13 French overseas territories (FOTs) scattered across three oceans and two continents. To address this critical issue, a dedicated Initiative has been conducted since 2005, with the support of a large panel of national and local experts and stakeholders. This paper summarizes the main results and benefits of this project after 7 years. As a first phase, an unprecedented overview of IAS and their impacts in all the FOTs was achieved. A total of 630 alien taxa were recorded, among which 258 plants, 52 terrestrial vertebrates and 32 invertebrates were identified as a threat, or a potential threat, to native species and/or natural habitats. Gaps in the knowledge about invasive species were also highlighted and a comprehensive set of recommendations was developed. Using a range of targeted collaborative actions and promoting the exchange of information and regional cooperation, the Initiative raised awareness of invasive species issues, improved access to information and strengthened local and regional capacities. In this paper, we report on the outcomes of the Initiative and what remains to be done with regards to the prevention of new introductions, early detection, rapid response and public awareness, as well as future challenges. © 2014, Springer International Publishing Switzerland.

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