Bratislava, Slovakia
Bratislava, Slovakia

The Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics is one of the faculties of the Comenius University in Bratislava, the capital of Slovakia.The Faculty was created in 1980 by separating from the Faculty of Natural science, having the name Faculty of Mathematics and Physics . It was renamed to contemporary name in 2000.It provides university education in mathematics, physics and informatics as well as teacher training in subjects related to these branches of study.As a rule, in each of the mathematics, physics and computer science branches the first and the second year are common and from the third year students can choose different specializations.After five years of study the students can attain the Master of Science degree. There is also a bachelor branch of study. Wikipedia.


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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: H2020-TWINN-2015 | Award Amount: 989.62K | Year: 2016

This H2020 Twinning project Achievement of Excellence in Electron Processes for Future Technologies (ELEvaTE) is aimed at advancing the excellence of the Electron and Plasma Physics Laboratory (EPPL) in the Faculty of Mathematics Physics and Informatics, Comenius University in Bratislava such that it becomes a centre of international excellence and an exemplar for other Slovakian HEI while furthering the Strategy for Smart Specialization of the Slovak Republic. EPPL has an established scientific reputation and has exploited its expertise in the development of novel future technologies. The EPPL is integrated in some international programmes and has hosted conferences but lacks experience in leading international projects, industry cooperation and disseminating results. The goal of the ELEvaTE is to provide the EPPL opportunity to learn from partners to achieve ambition of creating a centre of excellence. ELEvaTE will twin EPPL with the Molecular Physics Group at the Open University (OU) in United Kingdom and Nano-Bio-Group at the Institute for Ion Physics and Applied Physics at the University of Innsbruck (UIBK). The OU is exceptional in results dissemination and the UIBK combines research with enterprise (e.g. spin out company Ionicon, worlds leading producer of PTRMS), both are exemplars of widening participation and gender sensitive research and are strong in preparing IPR. ELEvaTE will be implemented through work packages with clear and measurable deliverables. The UIBK will lead the academic-industry cooperation and technology transfer while the OU will focus on means of results dissemination. The EPPL will adopt new codes of practice on technology transfer, academic-industry partnerships and revise its management structures to implement and sustain excellent science. The partnership will be exploited for submitting joint research project proposals especially within H2020. The EPPL will transfer its knowledge and scientific excellence to other HEIs.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 2.54M | Year: 2016

Soft chemical-ionization mass-spectrometry (SCIMS) is an exquisitely sensitive analytical technique with applications to health, the environment and security that are vital to the EU. However, the recent, rapid and widespread adoption of this technique has caught Europe unprepared. The resultant shortage in analytical chemical expertise has created an urgent need for highly skilled young researchers to be trained in the wide variety of SCIMS methods. IMPACT addresses this skills shortage by establishing an intersectoral and multidisciplinary SCIMS training network. IMPACT also brings cohesion to the fragmented SCIMS research and development activities within the EU. To date, most SCIMS developments have been driven not by users but by manufacturers, whose main focus has been on increased sensitivity. However, just as crucial is improved selectivity. Indeed, many users consider improved selectivity to be the key to taking SCIMS technology to a whole new level. Instead of private and public sectors working independently, we need a fresh, intersectoral approach. IMPACT will achieve this through intersectoral work packages and multidisciplinary research projects. In place of major and costly changes in instrumental design, IMPACTs projects will focus on developing new methods for improved chemical specificity by manipulating ion chemistry. Hence, IMPACTs fresh approach will produce a step change in SCIMS instrumentation to deliver both economic and societal benefit to the EU. Specifically, IMPACT will train 10 ESRs within an integrated partnership of commercial, governmental and academic organisations, with planned secondments, 5 Advanced Training Courses, 7 interactive Complementary Skills Workshops, and 4 ESR Centred Research Meetings. IMPACT will therefore provide Europe with both a world-class capability in SCIMS technology and a cohort of highly trained researchers who will bring the benefits of that technology to citizens across the EU.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INT-05-2015 | Award Amount: 2.50M | Year: 2016

The EUNPACK project unpacks EU crisis response mechanisms, with the aim to increase their conflict sensitivity and efficiency. By combining bottomup perspectives with an institutional approach, EUNPACK will increase our understanding of how EU crisis responses function and are received on the ground in crisis areas. This entails exploring local agencies and perceptions in target countries without losing sight of the EUs institutions and their expectations and ambitions. It also entails examining the whole cycle of crisis, from pre-crisis, through crisis, and into post-crisis phase. EUNPACK analyses two gaps in EU crisis response. First, the intentionsimplementation gap, which relates to 1) the capacity to make decisions and respond with one voice and to deploy the necessary resources, 2) how these responses are implemented on the ground by various EU institutions and member states, and 3) how other actors local and international enhance or undermine the EUs activities. Second, the project addresses the gap between the implementation of EU policies and approaches, and how these policies and approaches are received and perceived in target countries, what we refer to as the implementationlocal reception/perceptions gap. Our main hypothesis is that the severity of the two gaps is a decisive factor for the EUs impacts on crisis management and thereby its ability to contribute more effectively to problem-solving on the ground. We analyse these gaps through cases that reflect the variation of EU crisis responses in three concentric areas surrounding the EU: the enlargement area (Kosovo, Serbia), the neighbourhood area (Ukraine, Libya), and the extended neighbourhood (Mali, Iraq, Afghanistan). The results of our research will enable us to present policy recommendations fine-tuned to making the EUs crisis response mechanisms more conflict and context sensitive, and thereby more efficient and sustainable.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: COFUND-EJP | Phase: EURATOM | Award Amount: 856.96M | Year: 2014

A Roadmap to the realization of fusion energy was adopted by the EFDA system at the end of 2012. The roadmap aims at achieving all the necessary know-how to start the construction of a demonstration power plant (DEMO) by 2030, in order to reach the goal of fusion electricity in the grid by 2050. The roadmap has been articulated in eight different Missions. The present proposal has the goal of implementing the activities described in the Roadmap during Horizon 2020 through a joint programme of the members of the EUROfusion Consortium. ITER is the key facility in the roadmap. Thus, ITER success remains the most important overarching objective of the programme and, in the present proposal the vast majority of resources in Horizon 2020 are devoted to ensure that ITER is built within scope, time and budget; its operation is properly prepared; and a new generation of scientists and engineers is properly educated (at undergraduate and PhD level) and trained (at postdoctoral level) for its exploitation. DEMO is the only step between ITER and a commercial fusion power plant. To achieve the goal of fusion electricity demonstration by 2050, DEMO construction has to begin in the early 2030s at the latest, to allow the start of operation in the early 2040s. DEMO cannot be defined and designed by research laboratories alone, but requires the full involvement of industry in all technological and systems aspects of the design. Specific provisions for the involvement of industry in the Consortium activities are envisaged.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INT-04-2015 | Award Amount: 3.72M | Year: 2016

This Project aims to address an increasingly pressing global challenge: How to achieve the EUs development goals and the UNs Sustainable Development Goals, while meeting the global target of staying within two degrees global warming and avoid transgressing other planetary boundaries. EU policies must align with sustainable development goals (Article 11 TFEU). The impacts of climate change and global loss of natural habitat undermine the progress achieved by pursuing the Millennium Development Goals and threaten the realisation of EU development policy goals. Our focus is the role of EUs public and private market actors. They have a high level of interaction with actors in emerging and developing economies, and are therefore crucial to achieving the EUs development goals. However, science does not yet cater for insights in how the regulatory environment influences their decision-making, nor in how we can stimulate them to make development-friendly, environmentally and socially sustainable decisions. Comprehensive, ground-breaking research is necessary into the regulatory complexity in which EU private and public market actors operate, in particular concerning their interactions with private and public actors in developing countries. Our Consortium, leading experts in law, economics, and applied environmental and social science, is able to analyse this regulatory complexity in a transdisciplinary and comprehensive perspective, both on an overarching level and in depth, in the form of specific product life-cycles: ready-made garments and mobile phones. We bring significant new evidence-based insights into the factors that enable or hinder coherence in EU development policy; we will advance the understanding of how development concerns can be successfully integrated in non-development policies and regulations concerning market actors; and we provide tools for improved PCD impact assessment as well as for better corporate sustainability assessment.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: REFLECTIVE-4-2015 | Award Amount: 2.48M | Year: 2016

The project proposes both to create an electronic registry of representative online and offline, private and public collections of cultural opposition in all former socialist countries in Europe and to study the origins, uses and changing roles of these collections in their social, political and cultural contexts. We seek to further an understanding of how these (private and public, alternative and mainstream) collections work, what functions they serve in their respective societies, and how they represent their holdings to the public. The project will examine the legal and political circumstances that determined the collections before 1989 and the conditions that shape them in the post-socialist period. The analyses of the collections will identify various types of cultural opposition. Objectives include: 1. an online registry and a transnational database of collections in the original languages and English that will be accessible to European archival platforms and networks; 2. descriptions of and guides to the collections to enhance the quality of research and provide guidance on the role of the EU in this respect; 3. country reports on the collections and proposals concerning methods of preserving cultural heritage, and a handbook on various types of cultural opposition represented by the collections; 4. online curriculum development and digital content for educational purposes; 5. a documentary film festival, traveling and online exhibitions and local media events based on selected collections; 6. a set of recommendations concerning how to exhibit the cultural opposition movements of former socialist countries for the House of European History. This project will highlight the positive aspects of the former cultural opposition movements, such as democratic participation, autonomy and cultural plurality, and will remind us of an important pan-European truth: that civic courage can produce genuine cultural values even under authoritarian rule.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: DRS-09-2014 | Award Amount: 7.47M | Year: 2015

With most of its population and capital goods concentrated in urban areas, cities are key to the European economy. One of the major challenges cities face are more frequent extreme weather events due to climate change.The current diversity of approaches and methods available for cities developing an adaptation strategy limits the comparability between cities of vulnerabilities, adaptation options, infrastructures, etc., and, as a result, the resilience capability. The lack of standardized information to prioritize and select appropriate adaptation options restricts the exchange of experiences between cities. The objective of RESIN is to provide standardised methodologies for vulnerability assessments, performance evaluations of adaptation measures, and for decision support tools supporting the development of robust adaptation strategies tailored to the city. To this end, RESIN aims to create a common unifying framework that allows comparing strategies, results and identification of best practices by Creating an urban typology that characterises European cities based on different socio-economic and biophysical variables Delivering standardised methods for assessing climate change impacts, vulnerabilities, and risks; providing an inventory of adaptation measures and developing standardised methods to assess the performance of such adaptation measures Collaborating closely with 4 case cities for practical applicability and reproducibility, and with European Standardisation organisations to ensure a systematic (standardised) implementation Integrating findings in a coherent framework for the decision making process, with associated methods, tools and datasets The consortium consists of 17 partners from 8 different European countries, experienced in urban resilience and climate change, and combining theory (knowledge institutes/universities) with practice (cities, consultancies, network organisation, standardisation institute).


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2015 | Award Amount: 1.32M | Year: 2016

The proposal is focused on the development of novel methods of detection of activity of enzymes, such as plasmin and lactase, important for milk industry and for lactose-free diet. Six experienced academic/research institutions, two SMEs, one governmental business company and one manufacturing company from 3 EU member states (Slovakia, Hungary, Ireland), USA and Canada will be involved in the research, development and validation. The main focus will be on application of high-resolution ultrasonic spectroscopy, surface acoustic and electrochemical methods involving nanofabricated surfaces for detection of enzyme activity in volume and at the surfaces. The output of the project will be the novel analytical assays and electrochemical sensor applicable in dairy farms and analytical laboratories, staff exchange between academic institutions and SME, training of the students in novel analytical methods and sensor developments in a world leading laboratories. The optimised enzyme based technologies for efficient control of levels of lactose in milk and milk based drinks will be one of important results of project, which could be commercialised by the project industrial participants. The organisation of training schools, workshops and transfer of novel technology will be among priorities of this proposal.


Zemkova E.,Comenius University
Sports Medicine | Year: 2014

This review includes the latest findings based on experimental studies addressing sport-specific balance, an area of research that has grown dramatically in recent years. The main objectives of this work were to investigate the postural sway response to different forms of exercise under laboratory and sport-specific conditions, to examine how this effect can vary with expertise, and to provide examples of the association of impaired balance with sport performance and/or increasing risk of injury. In doing so, sports where body balance is one of the limiting factors of performance were analyzed. While there are no significant differences in postural stability between athletes of different specializations and physically active individuals during standing in a standard upright position (e.g., bipedal stance), they have a better ability to maintain balance in specific conditions (e.g., while standing on a narrow area of support). Differences in magnitude of balance impairment after specific exercises (rebound jumps, repeated rotations, etc.) and mainly in speed of its readjustment to baseline are also observed. Besides some evidence on an association of greater postural sway with the increasing risk of injuries, there are many myths related to the negative influence of impaired balance on sport performance. Though this may be true for shooting or archery, findings have shown that in many other sports, highly skilled athletes are able to perform successfully in spite of increased postural sway. These findings may contribute to better understanding of the postural control system under various performance requirements. It may provide useful knowledge for designing training programs for specific sports. © 2014 Springer International Publishing Switzerland.


Silicon (Si) has been shown to ameliorate the negative influence of cadmium (Cd) on plant growth and development. However, the mechanism of this phenomenon is not fully understood. Here we describe the effect of Si on growth, and uptake and subcellular distribution of Cd in maize plants in relation to the development of root tissues. Young maize plants (Zea mays) were cultivated for 10 d hydroponically with 5 or 50 μm Cd and/or 5 mm Si. Growth parameters and the concentrations of Cd and Si were determined in root and shoot by atomic absorption spectrometry or inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. The development of apoplasmic barriers (Casparian bands and suberin lamellae) and vascular tissues in roots were analysed, and the influence of Si on apoplasmic and symplasmic distribution of (109)Cd applied at 34 nm was investigated between root and shoot. Si stimulated the growth of young maize plants exposed to Cd and influenced the development of Casparian bands and suberin lamellae as well as vascular tissues in root. Si did not affect the distribution of apoplasmic and symplasmic Cd in maize roots, but considerably decreased symplasmic and increased apoplasmic concentration of Cd in maize shoots. Differences in Cd uptake of roots and shoots are probably related to the development of apoplasmic barriers and maturation of vascular tissues in roots. Alleviation of Cd toxicity by Si might be attributed to enhanced binding of Cd to the apoplasmic fraction in maize shoots.

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