Columbus, GA, United States

Columbus State University

www.columbusstate.edu
Columbus, GA, United States

Columbus State University is a public institution of higher learning located in Columbus, Georgia. Founded as Columbus College in 1958, the university was established and is administered by the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia, and is fully accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. Wikipedia.

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The International Nurses Association is pleased to welcome Cathy Morris Pitts, CRNP, MSN, RN, CGRN, to their prestigious organization with her upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare. Cathy Morris Pitts is a Nurse Practitioner currently serving patients within Ivy Creek Health, LLC with Lake Martin Community Hospital and Lake Martin Family Medicine in Dadeville, Alabama, Wetumpka Urgent Care in Wetumpka, AL, and Ivy Creek Urgent Care in Tallassee, AL. With over three decades of experience in nursing, she is a specialist in critical care, emergency room, and  an expert gastroenterology nurse in endoscopy. Cathy’s career in nursing began in 1980, when she gained her Associate’s Degree in Nursing in from Troy University in Alabama. An advocate for continuing education, she later received her Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing in 2013 from Columbus State University in Georgia, and her Master of Science Degree in Nursing with a Nurse Practitioner concentration in 2016 from Auburn University in Alabama. Since graduating, Cathy has completed a number of advanced training courses, becoming a Certified Gastroenterology Registered Nurse and a Certified Registered Nurse Practitioner. To keep up to date with the latest advances and developments in nursing, Cathy maintains a professional membership with the American Association of Nurse Practitioners, the Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates, and is also an inductee of the Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing. She attributes her success to the support of her husband and colleagues, her drive, and her belief in continual education and learning. In her free time, Cathy enjoys working in her flower gardens, sewing, crocheting, making her own jams and jellies, and propagating plants in her greenhouses. Learn more about Cathy Morris Pitts here: http://inanurse.org/network/index.php?do=/4135622/info/ and be sure to read her upcoming publication in Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare.


Female faculty members hoping to advance to the highest ranks of academia face significant barriers due to male-dominated environments at colleges and universities, according to a new study of faculty at colleges of business led by a professor at Florida Atlantic University's College of Business. "We looked at lifetime productivity and found irrefutable evidence that, in line with double-standards theory, women have to do a lot more work than men to get similar rewards," said Len Treviño, professor of management in FAU's College of Business. "It's true there's a double standard. We tested it." The study, published in the Journal of Management, suggests that a masculine-gendered environment dominates colleges of business, leading to shifting standards when it comes to the highest senior appointments in academe. While the data was collected in business schools throughout the United States, the researchers believe their results would be replicable in other academic settings and in other masculine-gendered environments, Treviño said. Treviño and his fellow researchers Luis R. Gomez-Mejia at Arizona State University, David B. Balkin at the University of Colorado and Franklin G. Mixon Jr. at Columbus State University, analyzed appointments to the rank of named professorship by gender via a sample of 511 management faculty at top American research universities with 10 or more years of experience since receiving their Ph.D. They found that women are less likely to be awarded named professorships and that they derive lower returns from their scholarly achievements when it comes to appointments to endowed chairs. "Some of the numbers are shocking," Treviño said. "For management professors, and those in many other areas of study, it's all about publications in top journals that allow you to advance to the upper echelons." The research seems to show it's not a conscious decision to make things tougher for female faculty. "It's birds of a feather flock together," he said. "Males at the top run the show and they interact with other male gatekeepers. The competence of female faculty is more likely to be questioned while male competence is taken for granted by the gatekeepers. Academic institutions, like some other businesses, were created by men and for men. Things are changing but they're changing too slowly, in our estimation." The researchers conclude that women face biases that are so deeply embedded in the processes followed by leading academic institutions that they may not even be noticed until they are eradicated. Treviño hopes that this study will help increase awareness of the problem. "There has to be a conscious decision that this is not right and we have to change it," he said. "And you have to keep at it because people forget."


News Article | May 21, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

WaterSignal, a green technology company focused on water conservation, is pleased to announce the promotion of Aaron Beasley to Vice President of Sales. Atlanta, GA, May 21, 2017 --( “We are thrilled to see him fill this important role, and we look forward to a bright future with Aaron heading up sales,” said David Taylor, Senior Vice President, WaterSignal. Beasley joined the company in November of 2015 as a National Sales Executive and quickly advanced to the role of Assistant Sales Director. Boasting over 8 years of sales management experience, Beasley was a natural fit for the current promotion. Prior to his position with WaterSignal, Beasley served as the sales manager for a highly competitive company in the car industry. Beasley attended The Citadel on a baseball scholarship, and holds a Bachelor’s degree from Columbus State University. About WaterSignal WaterSignal is a recognized innovator in water conservation due to its real time water monitoring and leak detection system. Leveraging over two decades of engineering expertise, WaterSignal monitors domestic meters, irrigation systems, and cooling towers for residential, commercial, multifamily, senior living, medical, schools and colleges. WaterSignal’s intelligent, non-invasive device accurately measures water usage and reports the data in real time to a secure dashboard. While dramatically reducing water costs and footprint, WaterSignal saves valuable time and provides unique insight on our most precious resource, water. For more information, visit watersignal.com, call 844.232.6100 or email save@watersignal.com. Atlanta, GA, May 21, 2017 --( PR.com )-- WaterSignal, a green technology company focused on water conservation, is pleased to announce the promotion of Aaron Beasley to Vice President of Sales. His primary responsibilities will be to manage the WaterSignal sales department and extend the WaterSignal footprint nationwide. “Aaron has played an integral role in our growth and success over the past two years.“We are thrilled to see him fill this important role, and we look forward to a bright future with Aaron heading up sales,” said David Taylor, Senior Vice President, WaterSignal.Beasley joined the company in November of 2015 as a National Sales Executive and quickly advanced to the role of Assistant Sales Director. Boasting over 8 years of sales management experience, Beasley was a natural fit for the current promotion. Prior to his position with WaterSignal, Beasley served as the sales manager for a highly competitive company in the car industry. Beasley attended The Citadel on a baseball scholarship, and holds a Bachelor’s degree from Columbus State University.About WaterSignalWaterSignal is a recognized innovator in water conservation due to its real time water monitoring and leak detection system. Leveraging over two decades of engineering expertise, WaterSignal monitors domestic meters, irrigation systems, and cooling towers for residential, commercial, multifamily, senior living, medical, schools and colleges. WaterSignal’s intelligent, non-invasive device accurately measures water usage and reports the data in real time to a secure dashboard. While dramatically reducing water costs and footprint, WaterSignal saves valuable time and provides unique insight on our most precious resource, water.For more information, visit watersignal.com, call 844.232.6100 or email save@watersignal.com. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from WaterSignal, LLC


Watanabe F.,Columbus State University
Journal of neuropathology and experimental neurology | Year: 2013

Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness in the lower extremities that result from length-dependent central to peripheral axonal degeneration. Mutations in the non-imprinted Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome locus 1 (NIPA1) transmembrane protein cause an autosomal dominant form of HSP (SPG6). Here, we report that transgenic (Tg) rats expressing a human NIPA1/SPG6 mutation in neurons (Thy1.2-hNIPA1) show marked early onset behavioral and electrophysiologic abnormalities. Detailed morphologic analyses reveal unique histopathologic findings, including the accumulation of tubulovesicular organelles with endosomal features that start at axonal and dendritic terminals, followed by multifocal vacuolar degeneration in both the CNS and peripheral nerves. In addition, the NIPA1 mutation in the spinal cord from older Tg rats results in an increase in bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor expression, suggesting that its degradation is impaired. This Thy1.2-hNIPA1 Tg rat model may serve as a valuable tool for understanding endosomal trafficking in the pathogenesis of a subgroup of HSP with an abnormal interaction with bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor, as well as for developing potential therapeutic strategies for diseases with axonal degeneration and similar pathogenetic mechanisms.


Matic G.T.,Columbus State University
Arthroscopy : the journal of arthroscopic & related surgery : official publication of the Arthroscopy Association of North America and the International Arthroscopy Association | Year: 2014

PURPOSE: This study aimed to determine the ability of patients to return to activity after medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction or repair for patellar instability.METHODS: A systematic review was performed using multiple databases. Studies reporting outcomes with Tegner scores after repair or reconstruction of the MPFL were included. Surgical technique, Tegner scores, and episodes of recurrent patellar instability were recorded.RESULTS: Ten articles with a total of 402 patients were included. The mean preoperative Tegner score was 4.7 (2.9 to 7.5). The mean postoperative Tegner score was 5.8 (4.0 to 7.7). Forty-nine patients (12.2%) had a recurrent episode of instability, 11 of whom required additional corrective procedures. There was a statistically significant larger failure rate among those who underwent MPFL repair (26.9%) than those who underwent reconstruction (6.6%) or medial retinacular repair/plication (16.5%).CONCLUSIONS: Recurrent dislocation was higher in patients who underwent MPFL repair rather than reconstruction. However, repair and reconstruction had similar Tegner scores. Repair or reconstruction of the soft tissue structures contributing to patellofemoral instability is successful in returning patients to preinjury activity levels.LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level IV, systematic review of Level II, III, and IV studies. Copyright © 2014 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Patent
Columbus State University | Date: 2013-07-01

Disclosed is a Cognitive Map-Based Tactical Decision Simulation for Training (CMDST) uses fuzzy cognitive maps (FCMs) to: 1) model high-stress tactical problems or engagements and their causal relationships; 2) simulate situational activities immediately prior to, during, and following the occurrence of a tactical problem or engagement; 3) calculate the relative values of different courses of action; 4) perform individual performance and comparative analysis of selected courses of action; 5) conduct after action reviews to solidify lessons learned from the simulation; and 6) develop individual decision making action plans to outline specific actions to be undertaken to improve future decision making performance.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: CRII CISE Research Initiation | Award Amount: 174.97K | Year: 2016

As mobile and network technologies proliferate, so does societys awareness of the vulnerability of private data within cyberspace. Protecting private information becomes specially important, since researchers estimate that 87% of Americans can be identified by name and address, if their zip code, gender, and birthday are known to intruders. The goal of this proposal will be to develop a new set of verification tools, algorithms, and interfaces that enable secure, effective and unobtrusive management of users private information. The proposed approach leverages formal verification techniques to ensure that the intended privacy properties and goals are met. Because of the modular and robust design of the proposed platform, it can be re-aligned and tuned to accommodate the needs of specific use cases and applications (e.g., health-care, connected automotive systems, and smart cities).

The proposed system will: (1) use model-checking to ensure that updated rules and boundaries correctly enforce users privacy intents, given that users privacy boundaries and rules constantly evolve (e.g., due to aging, social pressure, and changes in health and personal relationships), (2) automatically translate control policies to privacy-preserving protocol executions, which provably enforce privacy intents. To achieve this, new approaches for activating privacy-preserving functionalities based on the knowledge of privacy rules and boundaries, as well as novel cryptographic tools will be used.

For further information see the project web site at: http://hodamehrpouyan.com/privacy.html .


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: ROBERT NOYCE SCHOLARSHIP PGM | Award Amount: 1.20M | Year: 2011

In this project Columbus State University is developing the Columbus Region Academy of Future Teachers of STEM (CRAFT-STEM). Elements of the project include a summer STEM Honors camp experience for high-school students, internships for first- and second-year students, Robert Noyce scholarships for 19 juniors and seniors majoring in STEM who are preparing to teach secondary school science or mathematics, and a Teaching Connection Seminar, which encourages preservice teachers to identify links between their STEM major and topics they expect to teach in their future classrooms. The program dovetails with existing resources for outreach, including a regional mathematics collaborative, an environmental learning center, and a space science center. On-campus academic support is available through the Math and Science Learning Center, and the State of Georgia has designated Columbus State University as one of 6 recipients of funding in its STEM II initiative. The science camp and the Teaching Connection Seminar are unique features of this project, which expects to quadruple the number of trained STEM teachers to serve an area of high need. Located near Fort Benning, the project also recruits students from among military dependents and retirees.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 230.49K | Year: 2016

This CISE Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Site award funds a new REU site focused on the security and mobile sensing at Columbus State University. The REU site will provide 8 undergraduates per summer the opportunity to work with faculty mentors in state-of-the-art research labs on projects in the important areas of cybersecurity and mobile sensing. Mobile computing devices and their associated sensing capabilities and applications are pervasive in our society. Security of these devices and the data that is collected through related applications is an important concern to all citizens. This site will give students an opportunity to explore and delve deeply into an area of computing that is relevant and timely. The REU Site will benefit from access to the new Cybersecurity Center at Columbus State University (CSU). CSU was has also been designed as a Center for Academic Excellence in Information Assurance Education by the National Security Agency. The students will also participate in a number of professional development activities and field trips that will prepare them for future careers as computing professionals in the field of cybersecurity, an area of critical need for the workforce of the future. This site is supported by the Department of Defense in partnership with the NSF REU program.

The project is led by an outstanding of faculty mentors to guide undergraduates in explorations of problems related to the security and mobile sensing. The goal of the site is to excite undergraduates and to provide research experiences to students who might not otherwise have opportunities for research experiences at their own institutions. The site will particularly seek to recruit students from groups under-represented in computing fields The site has the potential to will contribute to the field of mobile sensing and security through research and implementation of algorithms, frameworks, and applications for security and privacy, intelligent data collection and analysis, indoor location methods, and power management mechanisms for mobile sensor network environments. Computer security and mobile sensing are fundamental components of many consumer products as well as many common applications in areas such as healthcare, transportation and traffic control, home and building automation, environmental monitoring, and energy that are important in our society. These are all areas which should appeal to students and actively engage them in projects that are meaningful to the computing research community and relevant to all citizens.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: TECTONICS | Award Amount: 126.00K | Year: 2012

This collaborative project between investigators at Columbus State University and the University of Florida aims to resolve conflicting interpretations of the tectonic origin and age of a number of metamorphosed granitoids in the Ashland-Wedowee-Emuckfaw belt (Eastern Blue Ridge) province of Alabama in the southernmost Appalachians. Traditionally attributed to latest Cambrian-Middle Ordovician magmatism associated with the Taconic orogeny, the Elkahatchee Quartz Diorite, Zana Gneiss, and Kowaliga Gneiss have been considered by some workers to be part of an obducted Taconic island or peri-Laurentian arc emplaced atop the subducting margin of North America. SHRIMP-RG results from the dominant quartz diorite component of the Elkahatchee, however, suggest an Upper Devonian emplacement age with considerable evidence for abundant xenocrystic inheritance which may have complicated the initial whole rock and multi-grain analyses completed over two decades ago. The potential for significant Acadian-aged magmatic components in the Elkahatchee calls into question its association with a Taconic arc; a question which can only be addressed by detailed isotopic analysis of the various lithologies typically assigned to this batholith. Furthermore, since both the Zana and Kowaliga gneisses were assigned ages using some of the same techniques as those used to assign a latest Cambrian age to the Elkahatchee, attribution of these plutons to Ordovician orogenesis is also suspect. Spatially resolved U-Pb analysis of these plutons will provide the best temporal context for examining the Lu-Hf systematics of zircon components and, in combination, will allow us to constrain the petrotectonic evolution of parental magma(s).

Results from this project will shed new light on the tectonic evolution of the North American margin and the development of the Appalachian Mountains through the Paleozoic. Significantly, it will provide new constraints on fundamental questions regarding evolution of the southern Appalachian orogeny because of its bearing on the continuity and nature of subduction along the eastern margin of North America during the closure of the Iapetus and Rheic oceans. These results will also afford an improved understanding of the role of important plutonic elements in the evolution of the southern Appalachians, which will be of advantage to many institutions in the region for undergraduate and graduate instruction. Integration of student and faculty expertise and opportunities at these universities will have a significant impact on training professional geoscientists, who are critical to developing a strong national STEM workforce, and will provide valuable support for a faculty research program at a predominantly undergraduate institution through the Research in Undergraduate Institutions program (RUI). Finally, this project will afford a group of geology undergraduates an invaluable experience (from field to analytical) through participation in a geological research program, greatly enhancing their undergraduate education and enhancing the nation?s STEM workforce.

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