Cannes-Ecluse, France
Cannes-Ecluse, France

The Columbus International Film + Video Festival is a Columbus, Ohio, USA annual film festival which is designed to encourage and promote the use of film and video in all forms of education and communication. It is held each year in November Wikipedia.

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TIBA Parking Systems, in association with Signature Control Systems, has been selected by the Columbus Regional Airport Authority to install a new Parking Revenue and Access Control System (PARCS) at John Glenn Columbus International Airport (CMH) and nearby Rickenbacker International Airport (LCK). More than 7.3 million passengers utilized John Glenn International in 2016; a growth of 7.8% over the previous year. Following an $80 million terminal modernization investment completed in 2016, the airport authority is now focused on modernizing its parking operations. TIBA was selected to provide a complete, networked PARCS solution for the airport’s multi-level parking structure and 7 parking lots consisting of 74 exit and entrance lanes and 14,000-plus parking spaces. The new TIBA PARCS solution will also incorporate license plate recognition (LPR), to speed garage entries and exits in addition to an online billing platform to provide an easier, quicker and safer customer experience. TIBA’s complete PARCS solution offers unparalleled agility, tailored to the business needs of complex airport installations. TIBA PARCS uses advanced parking technologies to improve operational efficiency, build revenue, and enhance business intelligence. TIBA PARCS seamlessly integrates with third-party online services, such as parker loyalty programs, to create new business opportunities and to help guarantee investment security. “We chose TIBA Parking and Signature Control due to the complexity of the project. We needed the chosen PARCS solution to be future-proof and TIBA’s reputation in system integration is outstanding. The TIBA team has been a pleasure to work with and we look forward to growing our partnership over the coming years,” says Elaine Roberts, President & CEO of Columbus Regional Airport Authority. “We’re delighted with this opportunity to upgrade the PARCS technologies at CMH and LCK airports. For TIBA, this is a major step in expanding our brand in the airport parking market. We look forward to providing our partners with unparalleled performance and versatility for many years into the future," added Jon J. Bowsher, President, TIBA North America. About TIBA: TIBA provides innovative solutions for the Parking market, resulting in reliable, user-friendly products that lower the price of initial acquisition and the cost of ongoing maintenance. With 30 years of global experience, TIBA’s robust, scalable architecture enables parking operators to keep pace with the latest trends in centralized operations, automated smart facilities, web reservations and mobile payments. TIBA’s flexible software grants parking operators to be IoT connected, leveraging big data to increase revenue. TIBA’s agile integrations with third-party systems empower parking operators to be part of the Smart Cities ecosystem. TIBA serves parking operators and owners globally, across diverse industries such as Hotels & Hospitality, Airports, Universities, Shopping Centres, Hospitals and Medical Centres, and Local, State and Federal governments. For more information about TIBA, visit www.tibaparking.com About Columbus Regional Airport Authority: With its vision to connect Ohio with the world, the Columbus Regional Airport Authority oversees the operation of passenger-focused John Glenn Columbus International Airport (CMH), cargo-focused Rickenbacker International Airport (LCK), and general aviation airport Bolton Field (TZR). An independent economic impact study found that the three airports and select businesses with direct ties to the airports account for more than 54,000 jobs, $1.8 billion in annual payroll and $6.6 billion in total annual economic output. Learn more at www.columbusairports.com.


Cherif A.-Y.P.E.,Columbus International | Cherif A.-Y.P.E.,University of Phoenix | Todd M.,Columbus International
Case Studies in Nondestructive Testing and Evaluation | Year: 2014

Dowels are used in jointed concrete pavements to provide load transfer and improve performance. Misaligned dowels could cause poor joint performance that would lead to pavement distresses. An approach to detect misaligned dowel bars in concrete pavements using GPR is proposed. The paper addresses all forms and combinations of dowel misalignment. Equations were developed to identify each misalignment type, and statistical analyses were performed on major categories for the entire project. A decision on the acceptance or rejection of a dowel bar, a joint, or a pavement section, can be made based on the results of the computations and specified tolerance values. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Amer-Yahia C.,Columbus International | Majidzadeh T.,Columbus International
Construction and Building Materials | Year: 2012

Insulated Concrete Form (ICF) walls are widely used for a full range of building designs including residential, theaters, schools, and hospitals. ICF manufacturers cite several advantages compared to traditional building materials but builders are concerned by honeycombing that may occur during the pouring of the concrete, where gaps are left in the concrete. The development of gaps generally occurs between the foam and the surface of the concrete. Acoustic sounding, a traditional inspection technique to locate voids, would be unsuccessful due to the plastic foam. In this research study, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) was proved successful in detecting gaps that developed between the foam and the concrete, voids intentionally created in the concrete, and voids that developed during the pouring operation. Small voids (e.g., less than in.) were difficult to detect but are not likely to cause any hazard to the structural integrity of buildings. The tests were performed at different stages of concrete curing using both the 1500 MHz and the 2600 MHz antennas. It is shown in this paper that the first void in the concrete was detected at day 7. However the best results were achieved at day 28 of curing. Data analysis has shown the success of the 1500 MHz antenna, but also the limits of the 2600 MHz antenna in the detection of buried voids in ICF structures. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Trademark
Columbus International | Date: 2014-08-15

Computer application software for mobile phones, tablets, handheld computers, laptop computers, and personal desktop computers, namely, software for establishing and performing phone calls, over a variety of networks in the nature of the Internet.; Computer hardware for communicating audio, video and data between computers via a global computer network, wide-area computer networks, and peer-to-peer computer networks; Computer hardware for voice over internet protocol (VOIP) communications; Computer network adapters, switches, routers and hubs; Computer software for tions devices tuse with wireless telecommunicao provide wireless transmission of e-mail, text, voice, still images, information, data and other content via the internet and via wireless local area network devices that may be downloaded from a global computer network; Computer telephony software; Downloadable mobile applications for establishing and performing phone calls over the Internet.


Trademark
Columbus International | Date: 2011-03-06

Medical, surgical, dental and veterinary apparatus and instruments, in particular ECG (electrocardiogram) device for diagnostic purposes, and parts for these goods.


News Article | June 13, 2011
Site: www.luxurylaunches.com

If you are heavily loaded and want to splurge it on your deepest passion, you’re just a Ducati away! So says Columbus International, which is a company that offers an interesting way of touring France on a motorcycle in style and luxury. The relatively new company is organizing tours in exotic places like France using different Ducati motorcycles. One could use models like the latest Streetfighter, or Monster S2R 1000, Hypermotard 1100 and Supersport 848 to pick from the range of comprehensive tour packages such as a Gourmet Tour, a High Octane Tour, Offshore Ride Tour, and Nature Tour. They also offer special MotoGP and Formula One packages wherein you get helicopter rides and VIP treatment. The cheapest holiday will be a weekly pampering, costing you about $8,000 and the most expensive one costs $16,500. If are the type to believe that “One man show” is the best deal, you could rent out a Ducati Streetfighter for $345 or a Monster for $275. [Motorbiker]


News Article | June 13, 2011
Site: londonbikers.com

We're changing... after a decade of bringing bikers together in London, shooting the best photo galleries, covering the latest motorcycling news and features, we had to take stock and ask ourselves if our course was right and if we could do things better and the answer is yes of course, who can't do better? The world has moved on and we need to too. The web is more open, content is shared further, everything's integrated and biking is getting higher tech too. Nearly everyone runs a helmet cam it seems, uses intercoms, has GPS and has a super-computer in their pocket. We've decided to reboot LB, cut it back to basics whilst we build a new LB to make it even more relevant to todays bikers. With that in mind, we're taking LB back to it's heart - a communication platform for bikers, starting from the forum and building, shaping new ways to bring london bikers together. So for now that means that some content such as news, features and galleries aren't available, but we'll bring them back. Perhaps not as they were but it would be a crying shame to lose more than ten years worth of content just because we're taking a new heading, so for now, please stick with us and we'll try not to let you down.


News Article | December 9, 2016
Site: news.yahoo.com

U.S. President-elect Donald Trump waves after arriving at John Glenn Columbus International Airport in Columbus, Ohio, U.S., December 8, 2016. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President-elect Donald Trump is receiving an average of one presidential intelligence briefing a week, according to U.S. officials familiar with the matter, far fewer than most of his recent predecessors. Although they are not required to, presidents-elect have in the past generally welcomed the opportunity to receive the President's Daily Brief (PDB), the most highly classified and closely held document in the government, on a regular basis. It was not immediately clear why Trump has decided not to receive the intelligence briefings available to President Barack Obama more frequently, or whether that has made any difference in his presidential preparations. Trump's spokespeople did not immediately respond to requests for comment. Trump has asked for at least one briefing, and possibly more, from intelligence agencies on specific subjects, one of the officials said. The source declined to identify what subjects interested the president-elect, but said that so far they have not included Russia or France. Indiana Governor Mike Pence, Trump's vice president-elect, has been receiving his own PDB at least six days a week, the sources familiar with the matter said. Former Central Intelligence Agency briefer David Priess, the author of a book about PDBs, said that traditionally, Trump and Pence's predecessors sat for "daily or near-daily intelligence briefings" between their elections and their inaugurations. He said Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan did not start receiving their daily briefings until later in November, while the delayed election result in 2000 meant that George W. Bush did not start receiving his until December. = The briefings are not compulsory. Priess said that after his first election, Richard Nixon spurned face-to-face briefings, so paper PDBs were delivered to his office, only for a "stack" of them to be later returned to the CIA, unopened. Trump's casual attitude to the briefings attracted criticism from Representative Adam Schiff, the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee. "It is deeply disturbing that the president-elect has time for rallies but not for regular intelligence briefings," Schiff said. During the run-up to the Nov. 8 presidential election, Trump and a handful of advisers received at least two briefings from intelligence officials about broad national security issues. However, the pre-election briefings did not include the kind of secrets that are included in the PDBs that Obama, Trump and Pence now have access to. Such secrets include information about U.S. espionage sources and covert operations overseas. PDBs are presented to presidents and their closest aides by representatives of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), though material in them is prepared by the CIA, the National Security Agency, the Defense Intelligence Agency and other parts of the U.S. intelligence community, the officials said. During and after the election campaign, Trump raised questions about the intelligence on hacking of U.S. political institutions. In a statement on Oct. 7, ODNI and the Department of Homeland Security expressed confidence that the Russian government had "directed" hacking into "emails from U.S. persons and institutions" that was "intended to interfere with the U.S. election process." Trump, however, has repeatedly dismissed suggestions that Russia was behind the efforts, telling Time magazine earlier this week: "I don't believe they interfered ... It could be Russia. It could be China. And it could be some guy in his home in New Jersey."


News Article | December 8, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

CHICAGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Fitch Ratings has assigned Cable & Wireless Communications Limited (CWC) Long-Term Foreign Currency and Local Currency Issuer Default Ratings (IDR) of 'BB-' with a Stable Outlook. A list of full rating action follows at the end of this release. CWC's ratings reflect its diversified services and operating geographies, leading market positions, and solid network competitiveness backed by high investment level. CWC's market positions were further strengthened by its acquisition of Columbus International Inc. (Columbus) in 2015. The ratings are tempered by CWC's high leverage for the rating level, cash flow leakage to non-controlling shareholders for some of its key operations, and pressured growth in its main mobile and fixed-voice segments due to the mature industry trend. CWC is a wholly owned subsidiary of Liberty Global plc (LG), and is a part of LiLAC Group (LiLAC), which represents LG's Latin America and Caribbean operations. The company benefits from the strategic oversight by LG and its management expertise, as well as procurement and operating synergies gained from the group. LiLAC operating entities are separately capitalized and operations are managed independently; the LG group maintains a leverage target of 4.0x-5.0x for companies in the group. In Fitch's base case scenario for the short to medium term, Fitch does not foresee any material cash flow upstream to the parent given CWC's high leverage and suppressed free cash flow (FCF) generation that limits capacity for such cash flow upstream. CWC is an integrated telecom operator with operational geographies in the Caribbean region, Latin America, and the Seychelles. The company's operation is well diversified into mobile and fixed services and it has the number one market position in the majority of its markets, especially for the fixed-line segment following its acquisition of Columbus, which resulted in improved scale and network reach and quality. The market structure in most of the region is largely a duopoly between CWC and Digicel. Fitch does not believe the risk of a new entrant to be high given the relatively small size of each market amid the increasing market maturity, especially for the mobile service. Under this environment, Fitch expects the company's leading market positions to remain stable over the medium term although the competitive pressures should remain high. In addition, the company's continued high investment for network upgrades, under its three-year 'Project Marlin' capex plan, should bode well for its network competitiveness in the coming years. CWC's revenue growth has been stagnant during 2016 as most segments are pressured by a high level of competition and the unfavourable industry trend. During the first six months of fiscal year 2017 (FY17), which ends on March 31, 2017, the company's revenues contracted by 2.2%, mainly due to the suppressed mobile and fixed-voice segments. Fitch does not expect revenue contraction in the mobile segment to reverse in the short term as data ARPU improvement would not be sufficient to fully mitigate the mobile voice ARPU trends. Legacy fixed-voice revenue erosion is also unlikely to abate due to waning demand given cheap mobile voice or Voice-over-internet-protocol (VoIP) services. Fitch believes that CWC's broadband and managed services segments will be the main growth drivers backed by its increasing subscriber base and relatively low service penetrations, and growing corporate/government clients' IT service demands. Overall, Fitch forecasts these two segments will enable resumed modest revenue growth in FY18. Despite revenue contraction, the company has managed to improve its EBITDA generation by 1.5% during 1HFY17 compared to a year ago, mainly backed by cost savings from network and staff related synergies following the Columbus acquisition. Following the acquisition by LG in May 2016, the company also announced its plan to save additional USD150 million by 2020 on a recurring basis; half is through opex reduction and the remainder is capex savings. These acquisition-synergy-driven cost reductions should help the company maintain relatively stable EBITDA margins over the medium term at 37%-38%. Fitch expects CWC's FCF generation to remain negative in FY17 due to high capex, which has remained in negative territory since FY14. The company also paid special dividend of USD194 million related to LG's acquisition of CWC during FY17, which was funded by its Term Loan B2 at Sable International Finance Limited (SIFL). Despite continued EBITDA improvement to USD950 million in FY16 (USD902 million on a restated basis under US GAAP following LG's acquisition), the company's CFFO generation was weak, just USD138 million, mainly due to increased working capital and high cash finance expenses. Capex remained high at USD528 million during FY16, accounting for 22% of total sales, and the company also paid dividends of USD116 million, resulting in negative FCF generation of USD506 million and negative 21% of FCF margin, in line with the FY15 level of negative 22%. Positively, in the absence of any dividends and reduced capex following the completion of the project Marlin, Fitch expects CWC's FCF generation to turn modestly positive from FY18, which should lead to modest medium-term deleveraging. CWC's leverage is high for the rating level. The company's adjusted net debt to EBITDAR leverage has increased to 3.6x at end-FY16 from just 2.0x in FY14 mainly due to its Columbus acquisition in 2015 and continued negative FCF generation. Given the aforementioned negative FCF projection for FY17, Fitch estimates the company's adjusted-net-debt-to-EBITDAR leverage to increase to 4.4x by end-FY17 and modestly improve to 4.2x over the medium. Also, the company's cash-flow-based leverage was weaker than EBITDAR-based metrics as its FFO-adjusted net leverage was 5.2x at end-FY16. The IDR of CWC is based on the consolidated credit profile of the group, including Columbus, given the high degree of operational integration and common business and financial strategy. For issuance ratings, Fitch believes the creditors of SIFL debt, including revolving credit facility and term loan, as well as senior unsecured notes, enjoy structurally senior guarantees from key intermediate and ultimate holding companies of the group, compared to the unsecured notes at Cable & Wireless International Finance B.V. (CWIF), which is only guaranteed by Cable & Wireless Limited (CWL). Based on Fitch's recovery analysis, debts at SIFL are assigned RR4 recovery ratings, which represent an average recovery prospect in the case of default, resulting in the same issuance ratings as the group IDR of 'BB-'. Based on the waterfall approach, Fitch does not expect there to be meaningful residual value left for the unsecured notes at CWIF after covering senior claims at SIFL, resulting in a RR5 recovery rating and a 'B+' issuance rating, which is a notch lower than the IDR. Recovery rating on Columbus' senior unsecured notes should be based on its own asset pool and cash flow generation given the separate guarantor group structure from SIFL guarantor group. As such, Fitch has assessed Columbus' notes recovery prospects on a stand-alone basis, and assigned 'RR4' recovery rating, resulting in the same issuance rating as the group IDR of 'BB-'. CWC's leading market position, diversified operations, and relatively stable EBITDA generation compare in line or favourably against other regional telecom operators in the 'BB' rating category. This strength is offset to a degree by its higher leverage than most peers in the same rating category and continued short-term negative FCF generation. Also, LG's group financial policy is a constraint on CWC's ratings. The company's overall financial profile is stronger than its direct regional competitor, Digicel Group Limited, which is rated 'B'. No country ceiling, parent-subsidiary linkage, or operating environment aspects impact the ratings. Fitch's key assumptions within the rating case for CWC include --Negative revenue growth in FY17, followed by low-single-digits revenue growth from FY18 and beyond; --EBITDA margin to continue to improve close to 38% by FY18, mainly due to operational synergies from LG's acquisition; --Capital intensity to gradually fall toward 16% by FY19; --No shareholder distribution in terms of dividends, or intercompany loans; --Adjusted net debt to EBITDAR to remain in the range of 4.0x-4.5x over the medium term. Future Developments That May, Individually or Collectively, Lead to Negative Rating Action --Muted revenue growth and margin erosion due to intense competition and lower-than-expected synergy benefits from the acquisition by LG, and continued high capex and working capital burden resulting in sustained negative FCF generation; --Sustained deterioration in its adjusted net leverage, increasing toward 5.0x from the current projection range of 4.0x - 4.5x. Future Developments That May, Individually or Collectively, Lead to Positive Rating Action --Clear commitment for deleveraging in the absence of any material cash flow upstream to LG, resulting in its adjusted net leverage falling well below 4.0x on a sustained basis; --Improvement of its FFO-based net leverage, more closely aligned with the EBITDAR based leverage ratios. CWC's liquidity profile is sound, backed by its long dated debt maturities profile and stable operational cash flow generation. The company held USD231 million of readily-available cash as of Sept. 30, 2016, while its debt maturities until the end-2017 was USD142 million. CWC also has a USD625 million revolving credit facility at SIFL, which increased from USD570 million during October 2016, with USD220 million of unused availability to be drawn. The company also has credit facilities at its regional operating subsidiaries, mainly Panama, totalling USD368 million, of which USD286 million was drawn and USD82 million was undrawn as of Sept. 30, 2016. These facilities further bolster CWC's financial flexibility. The company has good access to international capital market. Fitch has assigned the following ratings, Additional information is available on www.fitchratings.com. ALL FITCH CREDIT RATINGS ARE SUBJECT TO CERTAIN LIMITATIONS AND DISCLAIMERS. PLEASE READ THESE LIMITATIONS AND DISCLAIMERS BY FOLLOWING THIS LINK: HTTPS://WWW.FITCHRATINGS.COM/UNDERSTANDINGCREDITRATINGS. 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