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Shah A.,Mount Sinai School of Medicine | Chisolm-Straker M.,Mount Sinai School of Medicine | Chisolm-Straker M.,Columbia NY Presbyterian Hospital | Alexander A.,Mount Sinai School of Medicine | And 3 more authors.
American Journal of Emergency Medicine | Year: 2014

Background Gastrointestinal hemorrhage (GIH) is a common complaint seen in the emergency department (ED) and carries a small but significant mortality rate. The principal purpose of this investigation was to determine whether an ED venous lactate as part of initial laboratory studies is predictive of mortality in patients admitted to the hospital for GIH. Methods Retrospective cohort study for 6 years at an urban tertiary referral hospital included all ED patients with the charted diagnosis of acute GIH. Serum lactate was drawn at the bedside as part of patient care after arrival to the ED at the discretion of the clinical team. Clinical parameters and inpatient mortality were collected from the medical record. Optimal cut points for lactate were derived using receiver operating characteristics curves and imputed into a multivariable logistic regression model. Results Of the 2834 medical records that had GIH diagnoses, 1644 had an ED lactate recorded. A lactate greater than 4 mmol/L conferred a 6.4-fold increased odds of in-hospital mortality (94% specificity, P <.001). Controlling for age, initial hematocrit, and heart rate, every 1-point increase in lactate conferred a 1.4-fold increase in the odds of mortality. Conclusions Elevated initial lactate drawn in the ED can be associated with in-hospital mortality for ED patients with acute GIH. Prospective validation studies are warranted. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.


PubMed | Columbia NY Presbyterian Hospital and Columbia University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of biomedical optics | Year: 2016

Tissue composition of the atria plays a critical role in the pathology of cardiovascular disease, tissue remodeling, and arrhythmogenic substrates. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the ability to capture the tissue composition information of the human atria. In this study, we developed a region-based automated method to classify tissue compositions within human atria samples within OCT images. We segmented regional information without prior information about the tissue architecture and subsequently extracted features within each segmented region. A relevance vector machine model was used to perform automated classification. Segmentation of human atrial ex vivo datasets was correlated with trichrome histology and our classification algorithm had an average accuracy of 80.41% for identifying adipose, myocardium, fibrotic myocardium, and collagen tissue compositions.


Gan Y.,Columbia University | Tsay D.,Columbia NY Presbyterian Hospital | Amir S.B.,Columbia University | Marboe C.C.,Columbia University | Hendon C.P.,Columbia University
Journal of Biomedical Optics | Year: 2016

Tissue composition of the atria plays a critical role in the pathology of cardiovascular disease, tissue remodeling, and arrhythmogenic substrates. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the ability to capture the tissue composition information of the human atria. In this study, we developed a region-based automated method to classify tissue compositions within human atria samples within OCT images. We segmented regional information without prior information about the tissue architecture and subsequently extracted features within each segmented region. A relevance vector machine model was used to perform automated classification. Segmentation of human atrial ex vivo datasets was correlated with trichrome histology and our classification algorithm had an average accuracy of 80.41% for identifying adipose, myocardium, fibrotic myocardium, and collagen tissue compositions. © 2016 The Authors.

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