Colorectal Research Center

Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Colorectal Research Center

Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
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PubMed | Colorectal Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences and Shiraz Blood Transfusion Organization
Type: | Journal: Advanced biomedical research | Year: 2016

Seton-based techniques are among popular methods for treating high type anal fistula. These techniques are categorized to cutting and noncutting regarding their mechanism of action. In this report we are about to describe a new technique, which is a combination of both mechanisms; we call it Pulling Seton.In this technique after determining internal and external orifice of fistula, fistulectomy is done from both ends to the level of external sphincteric muscle. Finally, a remnant of fistula, which remains beneath external sphincteric muscle is excised, and Seton is passed instead of it and tied externally. After the wound heals, patient is asked to pull down the Seton for 3-4 min, 4 times a day. We prospectively enrolled 201 patients with high type anal fistula in this study.Seton gradually passes through external sphincteric muscle till it is displaced outwards or removed by a surgeon via a small incision. 94% of patients treated by this method accomplished their treatment completely without recurrence. None of the patients developed permanent fecal or gas incontinence. Only 5% of patients developed with recurrence of fistula. Since Seton traction is not permanent in this technique, Seton cuts external sphincter slowly, and minimal rate of incontinence is reported.Pulling Seton seems to be an efficient way in treating high type anal fistula with minimal rate of recurrence and complications such as incontinence and authors suggest further randomized studies to compare its efficacy with other Seton-based techniques.


Zubaidi A.M.,Colorectal Research Center | Al-Saud N.H.,Colorectal Research Center | Al-Qahtani X.A.,Colorectal Research Center | Shaik S.A.,King Saud University | And 3 more authors.
Saudi Medical Journal | Year: 2012

Objectives: To study bowel patterns (function/habits) and its associated variables in an adult Saudi population. Methods: In a cross sectional study, a 21-item questionnaire on bowel function (habits and frequency) was distributed to 10,000 high school students from all 5 regions of Riyadh City, Saudi Arabia, between February and April 2011. The randomly selected students, and 2 of their household or family members completed the questionnaire. Socio-demographic characteristics, eating habits, chronic diseases, and medications used were studied. Result: Sixty-one percent (N=4918) were above the age of 16 years, of which 51.5% were males, and 88.1% were Saudis. It was observed that 18.1% of respondents perceived their bowel movements as being irregular and abnormal. There was no association between gender and abnormal/irregular bowel movement (OR: 0.89; p=0.13). Individuals over 60 years suffered from bowel pattern abnormalities (OR=1.8; p=0.01). Educational status (secondary), occupation (teacher and unemployed), diet habits, and chronic diseases of study subjects were also statistically significantly associated with their bowel movements. Respondents consuming more vegetables, fruits, meats, dairy products, and rice had significantly more normal bowel movements. Females tended to defecate less frequently as compared with males (p<0.0001). Approximately 40% of both genders have bowel movements at least once a day. Conclusion: Our results may serve as a baseline for appropriate intervention strategies, and also for future studies to substantiate, negate, or add more observations/conclusions.

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