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Winters L.,Colo. based Print This Inc.
Printwear | Year: 2011

Lon Winters, president of Print This, Inc., Colorado, US, shared his views on the efforts of his company to use the 'Cowboys of Faith' quotation from a belt buckle of a cowboy outfit for creating high-density print concepts for infant and women's wear. The belt buckle was converted into a full front printed design for garments by the company in an effort to develop creative designs. The company imported the high resolution scan at 300 dpi into Photoshop to create the design the high-density design for garments. It put the background in black, as it wanted to print the design on several shades of gray to black. The company emphasized on creating a dimensional font and arching it around the outside of the buckle imagery as it wanted the new version to be a bit different than the first version.


Winter L.,Colo. Based Print This Inc.
Printwear | Year: 2011

Lon Winters, president of Colo.-based Print This, Inc./GraphicElephants. com, shares views on a project to print an image of SGT Sara Davis and SPC Jessika Williams standing in a Hummer in Afghanistan, where they had been on a mission. The project was begun by opening a color photo into Photoshop. It was simply an emailed jpeg image in fairly low resolution form. For the project, a gray scale or duotone of the photo was to run, so it was required to turn the full-color photo into a black and white. The Image and then Adjustments and Hue/Saturation from the top menu were chosen with the image open in Photoshop. Adjusting the saturation slider all the way to the left, at 100 percent, and bingo, the color was gone but the tonal values remain. There was the gray-scale image. The oversized gray film was exposed on a new, larger static framed screen with 305 meshes stretched to 20 N/cm. The balance of the plates went on 230s all at 20 to 25 Newton.


Winters L.,Colo. Based Print This Inc.
Printwear | Year: 2010

Lon Winters, president, Print This, Inc., US, discussed topics including future line development, pricing, production schedules and the project to be shared with the company's clients that manufactured several branded clothing lines. The participants in the meeting stated that it was essential to focus on performance with a purpose. It was found that the efforts of the design team resulted in the long-sleeve performance running shirts turning out clean and matching the paper proofs from the design department very well. These efforts helped the partners in the project to cover its costs and improve their performance with a purpose.


Winters L.,Colo. Based Print This Inc.
Printwear | Year: 2010

The Christian-Edge.com part of the business tries to be involved in a number of outreach and other Christian projects. Once all colors were converted to spot colors, the printed out separations right out of Illustrator. Once in the RIP, one would make sure the process colors were turned off and only those spots were to print to film. Two screens would be exposed on one of our standard size retension-able roller frames. The black was long but not all that wide and the white was relatively small, so only the one screen would need to be oversized. The company laid the entire shirt right on top of the platen, not threading it as they would when loading a more traditional print. To get the Ts to stay together, workers at the company sprayed a simple heavy starch into the middle of the opened. All garments would have labels cut out and the ATA brand printed into the neck. That was the easy part, whereas each size, country of origin and contents would also need to be in each shirt, which is a different label.


Winters L.,Colo. Based Print This Inc. | Hendricks D.,Colo. Based Print This Inc.
Printwear | Year: 2010

Lon Winters, president, Print This, Incorporation/GraphicElephants.com and Don Hendricks, art director, Ocean Pacific, shares views on the tools developed by them to create the designs for their wearable art. They created a path to wrap around the curves of the circle in the main shape and were able to shape and twist the type just right to fit the spaces and, to add some texture they threw a distressed filter over the top. The layer was duplicated to a second layer, which was reduced considerably by selecting and dragging in a corner. They even added the recognizable dove floating off by itself for a third color, where they could throw in some foil. They decided on a couple of super soft-tone inks that would go on most any colored T-shirt that includes an antique lighter tone-on-tone in the foreground and a grayed-out darker tone for the background shape. The soft ink and thin deposit in combination with the soft garments made for a super soft and breathable print.


Winters L.,Colo. Based Print This Inc. | Hendricks D.,Colo. Based Print This Inc.
Printwear | Year: 2010

Lon Winters and Don Hendricks were contacted by the Athey family to print Harold T. Holden's 'Keeper of the Plains' design on thousands of shirts. Lon and Don took one of the prints to their local service bureau to have it scanned to size at high resolution and after importing it into Photoshop, manipulated the art by the individual curves to their liking. They opted for the index separation method on this image because they had a 10-color press and wanted to use every head to make sure the machine was completely operational. Careful attention was given to matching colors exactly based on a color proof output of the image and color bars on a good matte-finished paper. The transitions from light to mid-tone to shadow were the most important. Because of the considerable detail and consistent size of the pixels, 230 tpi (threads per inch) mesh was used for the screens. The final print was beautiful and really captured the spirit of the artist's work.


Winters L.,Colo. Based Print This Inc. | Hendricks D.,Colo. Based Print This Inc.
Printwear | Year: 2010

Lon Winters, head of production and Don Hendricks, art director, both at Ocean Pacific, were given the task of designing a logo for the owners of the Triumph, a British manufactured motorcycle. Firstly, they traced the flag using the Bezier tool in Illustrator and laid out some type. By selecting all the objects on our first layer then copying and pasting to an additional layer, they were able to add a couple of strokes to make the copy larger. Once configured appropriately, they exported the whole design to Photoshop where they were able to add some shape and depth with shadows and highlights. They wanted to create a spot color swatch to represent the base plate so we used a nasty green. A half-point stroke is added around each color on the base plate. As they continue with each element, negative space appears between each color. After the output of all colors and the base plate, they ran top colors including the highlight white on 196 to 230 tpi and the base plate on a 156. The shirts turned out clean and matched the paper products very well.


Winters L.,Colo. Based Print This Inc.
Printwear | Year: 2010

Lon Winters explains how one of the major ink manufacturers asked his company GraphicElephants.com to give a demonstration of one of its products for the World Cup. Lon and his team opened the picture in Photoshop and turned the color photo into a gray scale, placed it on a black background, knocked the contrast way back and saved it. They then opened the black-and-white file into Illustrator where they would finish their design work. Using some clip art templates, they added some wings and scroll work for the background in order to get a horizontal feel as well as tie the other design components together in the layout. Lacking any real color in the design at this point, they decided to add a little by way of foil. The shirts would be printed on an eight-color automatic and we had now used the first two heads. The foil adhesive would be in the last head, which left five colors to work with.


Winters L.,Colo. Based Print This Inc. | Hendricks D.,Colo. Based Print This Inc.
Printwear | Year: 2010

Lon Winters, president, Print This, Inc./GraphicElephants.com, and Don Hendricks, published technical writer, shares view on the process of printing the T-shirts for several of the shows each year at car clubs. They began with pencils sketching out some hot rods using some old-school car magazines for reference and then placed their illustrations on the flatbed and scanned them into Photoshop. Once the vector image was rendered, they could resize to any configuration without compromising quality, which is considered as an important factor for banners and T-shirts. Using registration system during exposure, they chose to run the halftone film positives on N272 tpi at a high-tensioned 45 N/cm2 on retensionable frames. The edges of the screens after drying were taped up, avoiding heavy blockout application because of the good dual cure emulsion. The inks were mixed using a standard Pantone mixing system and scale. The run was 600 pieces so they only mixed 3,000 grams of each coated color called for in a Pantone book.


Winters L.,Colo. Based Print This Inc. | Hendricks D.,Colo. Based Print This Inc.
Printwear | Year: 2010

Designers Lon Winters and Don Hendricks explain how they started their clothing business. They decided to print two whites and a black on the red bandanas. The first white would be exposed on a 156 tpi mesh at a tension of 35 N/cm. This film would get an eighth-point overall choke to compensate for any gain we may get on press. They set this screen up first, followed by a flash and cool station. What began with white migrated into black and finally red bandanas. With the opacity set at 50-ish percent and the new layer locked, they were able to see the new lines as they drew and recreated the image. The point of the beak would be our first anchor point, then others were set around the shapes until it was built around the mascot's colors. This way, when the fill box would fill in the shapes with color, it would be ready to be output to film on the inkjet.

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