Collingwood Environmental Planning Ltd

London, United Kingdom

Collingwood Environmental Planning Ltd

London, United Kingdom
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Maxwell D.,Global View Sustainability Services GVSS Ltd. | McAndrew L.,Global View Sustainability Services GVSS Ltd. | Schischke K.,Fraunhofer Institute for Reliability and Microintegration | Stobbe L.,Fraunhofer Institute for Reliability and Microintegration | And 2 more authors.
Digest of Technical Papers - IEEE International Conference on Consumer Electronics | Year: 2011

Consumer electronics have yet to reap the full potential of green technologies and ecodesign. The European policy framework is supposed to foster the implementation of environmentally benign product design, but largely addresses substance restrictions and energy efficiency in the use phase only. Resource consumption, usage of recycled plastics, bio-based materials and fewer substances of health and environmental concern, lifetime extension and design to facilitate recycling are only some of the design options, which enable additional significant environmental improvement potential. The paper explores the possibilities to incentivise these design features through policy measures. © 2011 IEEE.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2012.7.2.1 | Award Amount: 13.05M | Year: 2012

Eight Transmission System Operators (BE, CZ, FR, DE, IT, PT, CH, PL) and ENTSO-E, together with 4 associations of technology manufacturers, and 16 RTD performers propose a 3-year R&D project to develop and to apply a methodology for the long-term development of the Pan-European transmission network. The project aims at delivering a top-down methodology to support the planning from 2020 to 2050. First, it implements a set of future power scenarios, including generation units, the possible use of electricity storage and demand-side management solutions: scenarios for power localization are proposed with assumptions on the energy mix in each of the connected clusters covering the ENTSO-E area. Network studies are performed to detect the weak points when implementing the scenarios for 2050. Grid architectures options and a modular development plan are then proposed, including electricity highways, on the basis of power flow calculations, network stability analysis, socio-economic, network governance considerations, and with remarks from the consultation of European stakeholders. In parallel, an advanced planning methodology is designed, developed and tested with academic laboratories to address a few critical aspects of the above planning methodology, which may impact the robustness of the resulting architectures. This enhanced approach takes into account the correlated uncertainties in renewable generation and consumption, potential voltage and stability issues, and black-out risks including the feasibility of defence plans to avoid uncontrolled cascading failures of the candidate architectures. It includes the use of non-linear detailed models of power grids and stochastic optimization techniques. The dissemination is coordinated by ENTSO-E to reach the widest audience and to prepare the exploitation of the results. Standardization and complementary research efforts are pointed out for the future investment optimization with the support of the manufacturing industry.


Twigger-Ross C.,Collingwood Environmental Planning Ltd | Orr P.,Collingwood Environmental Planning Ltd | Brooks K.,Collingwood Environmental Planning Ltd | Saduaskis R.,Collingwood Environmental Planning Ltd
E3S Web of Conferences | Year: 2016

Over the past decade has been a policy shift withinUK flood risk management towards localism with an emphasis on communities taking ownership of flood risk. There is also an increased focus on resilience and, more specifically, on community resilience to flooding. This paper draws on research carried out for UK Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs to evaluate the Flood Resilience Community Pathfinder (FRCP) scheme in England. Resilience is conceptualised as multidimensional and linked to exisiting capacities within a community. Creating resilience to flooding is an ongoing process of adaptation, learning from past events and preparing for future risks. This paper focusses on the development of formal and informal institutions to support improved flood risk management: institutional resilience capacity. It includes new institutions: e.g. flood groups, as well as activities that help to build inter-and intra-institutional resilience capacity e.g. community flood planning. The pathfinder scheme consisted of 13 projects across England led by local authorities aimed at developing community resilience to flood risk between 2013-2015. This paper discusses the nature and structure of flood groups, the process of their development, and the extent of their linkages with formal institutions, drawing out the barriers and facilitators to developing institutional resilience at the local level. © 2016 The Authors, published by EDP Sciences.


Partidario M.R.,University of Lisbon | Sheate W.R.,Imperial College London | Sheate W.R.,Collingwood Environmental Planning Ltd.
Environmental Impact Assessment Review | Year: 2013

Constructive and collaborative planning theory has exposed the perceived limitations of public participation in impact assessment. At strategic levels of assessment the established norm can be misleading and practice is illusive. For example, debates on SEA effectiveness recognize insufficiencies, but are often based on questionable premises. The authors of this paper argue that public participation in strategic assessment requires new forms of information and engagement, consistent with the complexity of the issues at these levels and that strategic assessments can act as knowledge brokerage instruments with the potential to generate more participative environments and attitudes. The paper explores barriers and limitations, as well as the role of knowledge brokerage in stimulating the engagement of the public, through learning-oriented processes and responsibility sharing in more participative models of governance. The paper concludes with a discussion on building and inter-change of knowledge, towards creative solutions to identified problems, stimulating learning processes, largely beyond simple information transfer mechanisms through consultative processes. The paper argues fundamentally for the need to conceive strategic assessments as learning platforms and design knowledge brokerage opportunities explicitly as a means to enhance learning processes and power sharing in IA. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.


Sussams L.W.,Carbon Tracker | Sheate W.R.,Imperial College London | Sheate W.R.,Collingwood Environmental Planning Ltd | Eales R.P.,Collingwood Environmental Planning Ltd
Journal of Environmental Management | Year: 2015

As dangerous climate change looms, decision-makers are increasingly realising that societies will need to adapt to this threat as well as mitigate against it. Green infrastructure (GI) is increasingly seen as an ideal climate change adaptation policy response. However, with this research the authors identify a number of crucial knowledge gaps within GI and, consequently, call for caution and for a concerted effort to understand the concept and what it can really deliver. GI has risen to prominence in a range of policy areas in large part due to its perceived ability to produce multiple benefits simultaneously, termed 'multifunctionality'. This characteristic strengthens the political appeal of the policy in question at a time when environmental issues have slipped down political agendas. Multifunctionality, however, brings its own set of new challenges that should be evaluated fully before the policy is implemented. This research takes important first steps to developing a critical understanding of what is achievable within GI's capacity. It focuses on one of GI's single objectives, namely climate change adaptation, to focus the analysis of how current obstacles in applying GI's multifunctionality could lead to the ineffective delivery of its objective.By drawing on expert opinion from government officials and representatives from the private, non-government organisation (NGO) and academic sectors, this research questions GI's ability to be effectively 'multifunctional' with an inconsistent definition at its core, deficiencies in its understanding and conflicts within its governance. In light of these observations, the authors then reflect on the judiciousness of applying GI to achieve the other objectives it has also been charged with delivering. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | Imperial College London, Carbon Tracker and Collingwood Environmental Planning Ltd
Type: | Journal: Journal of environmental management | Year: 2014

As dangerous climate change looms, decision-makers are increasingly realising that societies will need to adapt to this threat as well as mitigate against it. Green infrastructure (GI) is increasingly seen as an ideal climate change adaptation policy response. However, with this research the authors identify a number of crucial knowledge gaps within GI and, consequently, call for caution and for a concerted effort to understand the concept and what it can really deliver. GI has risen to prominence in a range of policy areas in large part due to its perceived ability to produce multiple benefits simultaneously, termed multifunctionality. This characteristic strengthens the political appeal of the policy in question at a time when environmental issues have slipped down political agendas. Multifunctionality, however, brings its own set of new challenges that should be evaluated fully before the policy is implemented. This research takes important first steps to developing a critical understanding of what is achievable within GIs capacity. It focuses on one of GIs single objectives, namely climate change adaptation, to focus the analysis of how current obstacles in applying GIs multifunctionality could lead to the ineffective delivery of its objective. By drawing on expert opinion from government officials and representatives from the private, non-government organisation (NGO) and academic sectors, this research questions GIs ability to be effectively multifunctional with an inconsistent definition at its core, deficiencies in its understanding and conflicts within its governance. In light of these observations, the authors then reflect on the judiciousness of applying GI to achieve the other objectives it has also been charged with delivering.


Eales R.P.,Collingwood Environmental Planning Ltd | Sheate W.R.,Collingwood Environmental Planning Ltd
Journal of Environmental Assessment Policy and Management | Year: 2011

This paper explores the challenges and lessons from recent practice and experience of applying tools such as Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) and Sustainability Appraisal at the policy level in the UK and Europe. It investigates whether or not these tools have been effective and helped to deliver more sustainable development at the high level of national policy development. The analysis is illustrated by case examples from the UK, such as Eco-towns and Energy Planning. The paper concludes that the current performance by the UK Government in implementing the SEA Directive for national level strategic actions is far from exemplary. At the root of the problem is the poor consideration and evaluation of reasonable alternatives, the fundamentally weak conception of sustainability adopted and the apparent perception that having to undertake an assessment and comply with the SEA Directive is a hurdle, rather than a useful mechanism for helping to deliver better and more sustainable evidence-based policy making. © 2011 Imperial College Press.


Sheate W.R.,Imperial College London | Sheate W.R.,Collingwood Environmental Planning Ltd
Environmental Impact Assessment Review | Year: 2012

Twenty five years since the introduction of the European Union (EU) environmental impact assessment (EIA) Directive in 1985 this paper reflects on the extent to which environmental assessment (EA) processes, over the course of their evolution over the last 25. years in the EU, have provided a platform for enhancing accountability and sustainability. Surprisingly-in the context of legal mandates for EA-there is little reference in the EA literature explicitly to the literature on accountability and the role EA may play in this increasingly important aspect of governance. The paper explores EA implementation principally from an environmentalist perspective and particularly the way in which NGOs and other advocates for the environment in the UK and EU have used the EA legislation as a lever for increasing democratic, corporate and professional accountability of proponents and decision-makers alike. From an a historical analysis, including two historical EIA case studies and two contemporary SEA case studies, it becomes clear that EA has had an important role to play-at the legislative level in providing the requirements for accountability, and at the implementation level as the lever that can be used to hold individuals, organisations and authorities to account for their actions. The relationship with the shift to sustainability is a close one, since sustainable development demands greater public involvement in decision-making and greater accountability of executive decisions to the public. The lessons from this analysis allow the development of a nascent policy-oriented theory regarding EA's role in accountability, which provides a framework for a distinctive new area of EA research and policy analysis. Moreover, an accountability perspective on EA could help re-frame EA for policy makers from being purely an informational and procedural instrument to one which promotes better accountability and sustainability simultaneously. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

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